Jump to content


First Show And Tell Post Carvings


4 replies to this topic

#1 Steve0

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Location:Salt Lake Valley, Utah

Posted 30 October 2012 - 07:28 PM

These are carved in the Pre-Columbian "string cut" style prevalent in what is nowadays Costa Rica region before they turned from stone work to gold work. The black one is known as an axe god. The figure flanking it are also carved in the "string cut" style. A cordage string was pulled back and forth with abrasive mud applied as the cutting agent.

Steve

Posted Image
Posted Image

#2 Bella Nicol

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 128 posts
  • Location:Southampton, ON

Posted 02 November 2012 - 11:56 AM

They are very interesting! I did not know string was used to create this type of carving, WOW. That would be incredibly time consuming. Thank you for sharing!

#3 marz willis

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 48 posts

Posted 06 December 2012 - 06:06 AM

nice work... by string do they mean sinue?or like a hemp type string? lets us know... please.

#4 Steve0

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Location:Salt Lake Valley, Utah

Posted 06 December 2012 - 06:37 PM

I'm not sure what type of string or cordage was used but I would guess against it being any type of sinew or other animal product made into cordage. They stretch and degrade VERY quickly when wet. Probably some type of woven or twisted cord of a strong plant fiber in plentiful amounts; readily accessible to the carvers. They may have used bow saws strung with said cord and added the mud slurry of jade, quartz or other equally hard powdered stone to abrade the incisions and designs in the pieces. Here is a pic of Chinese men using a string saw to cut a jade boulder in the 1930's. Hope this helps.
PS- mine were carved with traditional tools to emulate the string carved style.

Posted Image

#5 mace ngata

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 41 posts
  • Location:Brisbane ,queensland

Posted 30 December 2012 - 01:52 AM

Thanks for these insights, and sharing what you have done with them i am always spellbound with the designs that predominantly pre metal and modern machine cultures came up with.The answers they found to solve problems , and the designs that show an in depth appreciation both of the material and the techniques developed to work with them . a lot of the designs like these ones i find much more appealing than some of the more intricate modern designs that machines help us to explore , they have an individuality , a sense of timeless permanence, and presence about them that is hard to replicate.
Cheers :)
mace.



1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users