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Shibayama


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#1 Guardian

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 10:36 PM

Hello talented people---I have tried it and I am hooked---anyone out there have any info on shibayama, the japanese inlay style ( abalone, tortoise-shell, amber etc. inlaid into ivory or laquer ) -- any pictures, book info or tutorials highly appreciated.....Ellen

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#2 Jim Kelso

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Posted 28 January 2007 - 06:27 PM

Hello Ellen. I haven't seen any information on Shibayama inlay per-se. Nor books devoted to it though it can be seen often here and there in various auction catalogues, and books devoted to Meiji period work. There is a lot of information on the web about inlay in general. I would Google "pearl inlay"(meaning mother-of-pearl) to see what comes up in the musical instrument field. The inlay techniques would be very similar regardless of the type of object, the main distinction being whether it is flush inlay or high relief.

Here's one site I found: "Pearl" inlay

For the uninitiated, here is a sample of Shibayama work from Trocadero, a specialist antique dealer.

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#3 Guardian

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Posted 28 January 2007 - 06:52 PM

Thank you Jim -- yes, the high relief would be what I am after. The only info I found so far is, as you mentioned, in auction catalogs and in art books, only in passing. I wonder why... this is such a big chunk of later japanese art it's hard to overlook. No matter if it mainly was import-ware - it still is a fine art form.
I'll post a pic when I have created something worthy of showing off. Thank you again for the reply....Ellen

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#4 Doug Sanders

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Posted 30 January 2007 - 09:01 PM

I think Shibayama-ware is considered a little bit over the top and tacky right now, at least to the collectors- the prices the auction houses get don't quite seem high enough sometimes. Also, I think generally speaking, it can be a very delicate craft- with pieces chipping and falling off at times. People might not want to take the purchase risk. Some of it isn't exactly inlay, but onlay which is more fragile.

Are you looking for technical comments and how-to's?

#5 Guardian

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Posted 30 January 2007 - 09:54 PM

View PostDoug Sanders, on Jan 30 2007, 06:01 PM, said:

I think Shibayama-ware is considered a little bit over the top and tacky right now, at least to the collectors- the prices the auction houses get don't quite seem high enough sometimes. Also, I think generally speaking, it can be a very delicate craft- with pieces chipping and falling off at times. People might not want to take the purchase risk. Some of it isn't exactly inlay, but onlay which is more fragile.

Are you looking for technical comments and how-to's?


Thank you Doug -- yes, I agree with the "over-the-top", I am more interested in the smaller pieces like boxes, utensils or whist counters. I cannot find any how-to's, I guess I just go by my basic knowledge of flat inlay--- even the how-to's for that includes a router, which I do not have and finding "old-fashioned" inlay tips is not easy. I'll be okay, just have to dig around in my overloaded noggin'. Thank you ---- Ellen


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#6 DanM

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Posted 30 January 2007 - 10:53 PM

The basic inlay techniques are shared by various cultures. a shaped pocket must be cut into the base material ,a corresponding positive is then placed into the pocket. metal inlays into a metal base are a bit different since they need an undercut to hold the inlay into the base. but for basic info try your local library and find an instruction book on marquetry or parquetry for the basics.

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#7 John M.

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 05:00 AM

View PostGuardian, on Jan 27 2007, 10:36 PM, said:

Hello talented people---I have tried it and I am hooked---anyone out there have any info on shibayama, the japanese inlay style ( abalone, tortoise-shell, amber etc. inlaid into ivory or laquer ) -- any pictures, book info or tutorials highly appreciated.....Ellen

"once the battle has begun it is too late to sharpen the sword"

Hi Ellen

If you still have any interest in "Shibayama " I can give you some pointers . We are restorers of
work or arts for the last 40 years.
Do you want to replace missing pieces or create your own Japanese style inlays?
You can look up superb Japanese Works of Arts included "Sybayama" In:
Splendors of Imperial Japan
Arts of the Meiji Period from the Khalili Collection
IBSN 1-874780-19-6
Regards
John

"To be born with talent is a gift.... but practice can take you to the top!"
Anon



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