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Lashing -- Myhre book

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Howdy all -- I need some help in deciphering the lashing technique shown in the Myhre book ... I used to do it with a loop pointing down, one end up, and then wrapping the long loose end around until it reaches the bottom of the loop, then thread the end through it and pull the top end (sticking out from underneath the wrapping) until the loop is under the wrapping.....he shows a different approach which I tried but it does not work.....thanks for the help!! Ellen

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Hi Ellen,

I think that Myhre´s ears must be as hot as the sun... (Argentinian expression used when someone is talking about other person that is not present) We discussed many items of his book in this forum.

What you described, to me, is very, very similar to his description. The only thing is that you have to start the process letting the end point side by side with the cord that is used around the neck... I will try to be simple here, start it by the end. First make the toki (or any other piece) as perfect as you can, it has to be with an even thicknes and equal distance, make with your eyes reather than making it with a ruler, then trace the lines and be sure to let a little distance from the top, not following the exact top line, move that horizontal line a few milimiters down, then trace your lines as shown in the drawings, file, sand, polish, make the hole, pass the cord and, with the same string used to hold the cord to the Toki start the lashing letting the end by its side. :D Is it clear? I hope so. :D

Start it by the end!!!!!!!!! :lol: Make sure to have a long piece of yarn to do the work, once you made a lot you can have quite an eye for the right yarn extension.

Here are some photos using this method:

post-318-1182480587.jpg

post-318-1182480604.jpg

post-318-1182480618.jpg

Sorry about the photo size, my monitor is dead... I´m looking at everything RED!!!!!!!!!

Hughs,

Sebas

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Hello Sebas,

This looks really cool! I've been wanting to learn more about lashings and weaving type attachments to some of my pieces, especially as I get more into carving stone and wood. Do we have some good books I can go to? Would you want to post a tutorial on some of these things? Here's an example of what I'd like to fasten with silk.

Thanks Sebas,

Magnus

post-239-1182486636.jpg

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Hi Ellen,

I think that Myhre´s ears must be as hot as the sun... (Argentinian expression used when someone is talking about other person that is not present) We discussed many items of his book in this forum.

What you described, to me, is very, very similar to his description. The only thing is that you have to start the process letting the end point side by side with the cord that is used around the neck... I will try to be simple here, start it by the end. First make the toki (or any other piece) as perfect as you can, it has to be with an even thicknes and equal distance, make with your eyes reather than making it with a ruler, then trace the lines and be sure to let a little distance from the top, not following the exact top line, move that horizontal line a few milimiters down, then trace your lines as shown in the drawings, file, sand, polish, make the hole, pass the cord and, with the same string used to hold the cord to the Toki start the lashing letting the end by its side. :D Is it clear? I hope so. :D

Start it by the end!!!!!!!!! :lol: Make sure to have a long piece of yarn to do the work, once you made a lot you can have quite an eye for the right yarn extension.

Here are some photos using this method:

post-318-1182480587.jpg

post-318-1182480604.jpg

post-318-1182480618.jpg

Sorry about the photo size, my monitor is dead... I´m looking at everything RED!!!!!!!!!

Hughs,

Sebas

 

 

Thank you Sebas -- nice work !! .... I was actually just questioning the simple lashing for the tool handles, I can't figure it out. And the material.....I tried split nylon cord but it stretches a bit, so far the best I have used is pearl cord. Kinda expensive, I am sure there are other cords that can be used -- I try not to use plant fiber since it won't last for long----thanks for the reply !!

Ellen

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I think what you're describing is termed whipping rather than lashing (Someone may correct me, but I think lashing is the binding of two or more items together with a cord). The method you give is the one I am familiar with- if anyone can describe Myhre's methods I'd be interested also.

 

As for a cord to use, I've had very good luck with waxed linen cord- it stays put on my small carving tools and the wax provides a good hand grip as well. There's some artificial sinew on the market that is often also waxed linen.

 

-Doug

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Hi Ellen,

 

I used to use the technique you described with macrame, to tie off and hide the end of the cord in the wound around part. I have used a fine florist's wire on some tools, to bind and strengthen the end of the wood tool with that technique as well.

 

I don't have SM's book here to look at the technique you mentioned. I'll have to look later. Sorry.

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Dear Ellen,

Sorry about my previous post!!! :D Here you have a nice picture of the same method: Kumihimo finishing, and also another idea here, another ideas here and another picture here. Hope to solve your doubt about it. Here you have another kind of whipping and another one right here. :D

Mr Sanders is right, whipping is the correct term reather than lashing. About Myhre´s method is the one described in the links. Here in Argentina I use the nylon waxed cord used for leather sewing, very strong and weather proof (Is that right? Hope so...).

Magnus, thanks for the comment, they looks so nice! B) About books, I think that Myhre´s is a good option about bone carving, and the Toki lace work and the Matau lace work too, basically they are the same. About knots I think that you can look for them in the net. A lot of good stuff. But I don´t know how to use the knot works in that particular piece in the photo, beautiful by the way, sorry. :( Browse this link and see what you can find. I really like it :lol: Lot of stuff!!!!!!

Hope to help.

HUGHS,

Sebas

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I think you are looking for the method to secure a graver to a wood handle. i do not have photo directions though. i use poly cord from most any hobby store or fishing line. the loop is at the handle end with a end piece at the graver point end. start wrapping at the graver end until you reach the amount of wrap you want.

 

thread the end through the loop and pull the grave point end to pull the opposite end under the wrap,then cut the exposed end at the graver point end.

 

graver.jpg

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Dear Ellen,

Sorry about my previous post!!! :D Here you have a nice picture of the same method: Kumihimo finishing, and also another idea here, another ideas here and another picture here. Hope to solve your doubt about it. Here you have another kind of whipping and another one right here. :D

Mr Sanders is right, whipping is the correct term reather than lashing. About Myhre´s method is the one described in the links. Here in Argentina I use the nylon waxed cord used for leather sewing, very strong and weather proof (Is that right? Hope so...).

Magnus, thanks for the comment, they looks so nice! B) About books, I think that Myhre´s is a good option about bone carving, and the Toki lace work and the Matau lace work too, basically they are the same. About knots I think that you can look for them in the net. A lot of good stuff. But I don´t know how to use the knot works in that particular piece in the photo, beautiful by the way, sorry. :( Browse this link and see what you can find. I really like it :lol: Lot of stuff!!!!!!

Hope to help.

HUGHS,

Sebas

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