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Janel

Apple Blossom and Peeper

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Thanks for the kind remarks. I had a funny thought just now, a necessary step in the photography by anyone doing a ryusa should be a candid shot of any of us trying to carve the inside area through the holes! I don't know about Natasha, or now Simon F. who has tried one, but I feel like I might need to stand on my head sometimes to get the light shining into the interior correctly, tool in another hole, and my sightline in yet other holes to all work together to be able to carve at a nearly impossible angle for the tools I have. I have a great deal to learn, that is for sure!

 

I think that I am done with the surface carving and sanding. Eye sockets are in, and the amber eyes are ready to be inset. I also decided to make a display stand while I waited for the eye treatments to cure.

 

I still have not decided how to finish the wood, which has a rich honey yellow, that deepens in color significantly with an application of any oil. I am watching the test pieces as the thinning agent evaporates, to see how deep or light the color becomes. More tests soon.

 

Janel

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yes You are right! standing on your head might be easier! My eyes start to ache from only being about to see in with one eye at a time.

 

Which Oils are you referring to for the finishing? I have been wondering if an oil might be the best for my red lancewood but am worried that it might cause dirt to stick to the surface when handling???

 

S

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Hi Janel,

Wow - it's coming along so well. I'm thinking that we may not ever get to see the interior in photo form. I am becoming more and more intrigued with this ryusa concept. Seems that getting the right amount of piercing or negative space that allows one to peek inside while at the same time complimenting the outside composition has much design opportunity!

Hello Natasha!!

It's so good to see your presence here again - I've been following your work on your website - so much beauty!

Magnus

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Hello Magnus!

Many thanks! :D

I very seldom visit any forum, because my eyes become too tired very fast, I need them fo carving! :angry:

I'll be here some more days then I'll desappeared again. Everyone can e-mail me! :blink:

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I have time for only one photo right now. Going to the big city for overnight... I'll get better photos after this test set of photos, and post good ones later.

 

I used Watco oil. My jar of it has thickened, I recall that it was not so thick some while ago. The design is just too busy and compact to busy it up with colors, and I was unsure about adding a thin wash of monochrome stain... so it is just itself, French Boxwood color.

 

Janel

 

 

417_w3.jpg

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Janel,

 

This is truly thrilling to watch. I love the frog and am impressed with the detail and composition. It all works together so well and is exquisite to view from all angles. Thank you for sharing this with us. I feel privileged.

 

Fred

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I like the natural color.

Sometimes things can be "prettied up" using colors, but in this case it isn't necessary. Plus the eye is where I focus and work my way out to the rest of the carving. Whether or not that is what you intended, it works very successfully in this wonderful piece's favor.

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It is finished! French Boxwood, Eye Inlay: Amber (Eyes that follow style). The stand is rosewood.

post-2-1204042404.jpg

 

Janel,

Beautiful, simply beautiful! To have colored it would have detracted from it, it is in your style, a quiet elegance. Where did you put your signature and how did you finish it?

Now I just have to get brave enough to try to carve a ryusa!

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Thanks everyone.

 

Magnus, I understand about the stand. I have all sorts of excuses, but in the end, if something is not working there is no excuse good enough, and the stand might get replaced or modified.

 

The client who purchased Natasha's latest piece communicated with me about how to display the ryusa she had just purchased. Natasha and I both felt that she needed to be cautioned away from using a museum putty for standing the piece up in the middle of a display case. It might have been OK but Natasha and I did not think so. The solution worked itself out with something the collector already had for a stand...

 

But that got me thinking beyond the completion of the apple blossom-spring peeper piece, how much impact and appeal would it have just lying down in a display case? So, my choice to place the uprights on both sides, to keep the piece from being jostled out of position or out of the stand... was made. If one was made with a deep groove for inserting the piece into, with no side uprights, then a different portion of the piece is hidden. A tripod stand would block one side.

 

Any ideas about how to display or create a stand for a ryusa netsuke with carving all around the surfaces?

 

Janel

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Another stunner Janel.

 

I actually quite like the stand. Unusual without being distracting and serves the purpose of holding the piece and beckoning the viewer to pick it up to see the hidden bits. For me, it doesn't detract at all.

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When I look at Janel's stand, I get the feeling that the stand is part of "the integrated package," and not just a stand for a netsuke. In other words, there is a nice circular carving in a cool box-thingy, not a ryusa netsuke on an unobtrusive stand designed to allow easy viewing of the ryusa. Which works fine if that is what the artist wants to convey, and that may be the best considering that Janel's major audience are not netsuke collectors, but art collectors who like small, high quality works but without the netsuke mystique. Depends on which way she wants to go here, I think each is a successful approach for different audiences.

 

If what you want is a more minimalist stand, here are a couple of ideas. The top version has angled dowels for a slightly more fancy look, and the more blocky middle/bottom version is simpler to make with vertical holes - easier for hand tools only. The dowels should be quite small in diameter, and only as high as is absolutely necessary to make good contact to steady the ryusa or manju netsuke, so make them taller to start with then trim to fit.

 

Might also work for kagamibuta if the lid is tight, or if one angled the stand to the rear (with longer dowels on the downhill side) so the lid wouldn't fall off.

 

Your mileage may vary, so if you don't like these ideas, I disavow all of my actions... :)

 

post-11-1204150085.jpg

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Thanks Jim!

 

Very interesting Tom! I will likely stay away from dowels, mainly because I don't have a drill press and am abysmal with drilling multiple holes that need to line up exactly. Any creation like your suggestions would look like spaghetti sticking out of a jar if I were to attempt this. On the other hand, my husband has made plate stands with dowels and small lumber (his looks like spaghetti until the plates are standing in a neat row :) ).

 

When I have more time to contemplate this combination, ryusa or manju and stand, one could grow into the other and be more of a decorative element... I just did not have the time to develop any ideas this week. This could be fun!

 

Janel

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I agree with Jim. I think if your photo wasn't cropped so closely, the stand would integrate better from our point of view. On a tabletop, with open space around it, I visualize it as very complimentary. You could try a stylized mushroom stand with the piece resting on a contoured cap. Just a suggestion, but I'd go with the stand at hand.

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Janel,

Thats just beautiful. The whole thing is really well done. If for no other reason than the contrast of color, line, and shape, I like the stand. however I can see how it might not suit everyone.

Dustin

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Janel,

She carved it like I said, the grain of the wood goes from side to side, that is why it has to strength to be carved thin.

As far as the beech, I'll send you some, I got it at a great deal and I don't know what to do with all of it. I just mentioned to a friend I had heard european beech was traditionally used as mallets the next thing I know he sent me some. I might as well share the wealth. It is hard, but a different typ of hard than boxwood, I don't know how to explain, but it is hard. It is a beautiful wood and takes a high polish easy and well. Absorption is not good, almost impossible to dye or color, paint just lays on the top, I have only found one way to get it to take a tint. I dehydrate the color ink or mixture of colors I want to use the rehydrate with naptha or ethanol and test the color on a piece of scrap piece to get the desired results.

 

 

It sounds neat. Do you still have any left?

LJ

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Any ideas about how to display or create a stand for a ryusa netsuke with carving all around the surfaces?

 

Janel

 

 

This is an old idea.

 

It took a little while to find any example. However, I believe that the use such finely carved wooden stands is a rarefied, but current practice on many levels...

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Janel

I know this is late for this subject BUT I have only just seen the thread :) .

I have had the same problem carving in tiny spaces, carving inside tiny spaces and felt much the same as you described. :blink:

For me part of the joy of carving was in the designing & making of tools for the purpose. It was frustrating, challenging & hard work spending a 1/2 hr making a chisel, gouge scraper whatever and using it for a short while (mins ?) and then ditching it. :)

 

I have been in awe of your work for many yrs and this piece is superb. The frogs eyes fascinate me. How were they made?

 

Toothy

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Nice work. I come here for inspiration and now after not having carved for a few months I am getting the urge again. Well, I say not having carved, but I did carve a couple of canes and a sunfish on the fishbox of the boat I made.

 

Thanks for sharing Janel. It's always a pleasure to see the work here and I do like yours a lot. Maybe because I like frogs.

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I know this is an old post, but I use a dental tool that my dentist saved for me. It is very small amd sharp pointed, but has teeth like a burr. It works very well in tight places.

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I was giving my carving hand a rest and was browsing the forum and found Tom's comment about the stand for the ryusa or kagami-buta netsuke. Since that time, I have been making practical and pleasant stands for those kinds of netsuke. Here is an example of one made last summer. The wood is black cherry, the disk is mammoth tusk.

 

496_w.jpg

 

496_reverse_w.jpg

 

Because it is small, the stand fits into the kiribako, or wooden box, with the netsuke.

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