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Phil White

Oil Gilding Process

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Phil:

 

Maybe the technique is Kum Bo. I did a little of this, I used fine silver, but you can depletion gild sterling. The gold leaf used is heavier than the leaf used for wood, more like foil, they sell it at Rio Grande. The trick is to bring the silver to 500 degrees and burnish the gold in and (supposededly) a molecular bond is formed. I got one of those small electric cooking elements, a 18 gauge piece of brass and a barbeque thermometer. I put the thermometer and piece on the brass and heated it up to 500 and placed foil on the piece and burnished it. You can also use a kiln. I used an agate burnisher, but you can use a metal one as long as you keep it cooler than the silver, otherwise you run the risk of it getting gilded too.

 

Debbie K

 

 

I think taking that route as appealing a technique as it seems these days, would have ruined the patina he puts on the vessels. I think he has some step by step pictorials but never about the leaf gilding bit as far as I recall. I will make some time soon and mail him and see, if no one else beats me to it first (which I don't mind if someone else does).

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Phil:

 

Maybe the technique is Kum Bo. I did a little of this, I used fine silver, but you can depletion gild sterling. The gold leaf used is heavier than the leaf used for wood, more like foil, they sell it at Rio Grande. The trick is to bring the silver to 500 degrees and burnish the gold in and (supposededly) a molecular bond is formed. I got one of those small electric cooking elements, a 18 gauge piece of brass and a barbeque thermometer. I put the thermometer and piece on the brass and heated it up to 500 and placed foil on the piece and burnished it. You can also use a kiln. I used an agate burnisher, but you can use a metal one as long as you keep it cooler than the silver, otherwise you run the risk of it getting gilded too.

 

Debbie K

 

 

Slow connection made me double post, so will use the second post to paste the find

 

He uses the same brand of oil gold size as you use Phil and then just uses the mops to push it in as you described.

 

http://davidhuang.org/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=5069

http://davidhuang.org/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=5072

http://davidhuang.org/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=5078

 

it makes me think that because he did the patina before, there must be still a layer of oxides on the inside of the vessel prior to gilding. Of course he could always clean it up before but he would be risking some damage to the patina as well and if needing to repatinate then he would risk most certainly damage to the leaf. Any ideas?

 

That's most generous of his to post the info on his website, so now I know the two people I have to thank when I successfully finish my first.

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Debbie,

 

Good call. I am familiar with the technique that you are describing, but have never tried it. I would be very interested in learning more about your experiences with this. Perhaps the next time you do this, if you have the opportunity, you could take a few photos?

 

Quite right, Hyllyn.

 

Interesting that he would choose that technique! Not the most durable finish for metals, but if you are only trying to create a gold effect, why not. There would be no need to remove the patina on the inside, provided it was stable.

 

It really is good of him to post images of his technique. Most people see this as a threat, fearing I suppose that people will copy their work, or develop on it and become better at their expense. I have always felt that it adds interest to one's work. It is great to see someone who is like-minded.

 

I was watching a cooking show once (another interest) and the chef, who was quite famous, was asked if he minded sharing his recipies. He replied that it didn't bother him one bit. When pressed why not, he said "If I were Picasso, and I lent you my paints and brushes, could you paint a masterpiece?"

 

Phil

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Hi Phil (Newbie here)

 

WOW!!!

What a tuturial you gave.

I never gold leafed/gilded before. I do wood carving and pretty new at that 2.

 

 

Some questions please.

 

1. What the most SIMPLEST way to gold leaf lets say a; simply basswood carved pair of angel wings.

2. What would you suggest how I go about do that ?

 

Phil please make it from step 1 two right thru to the end.

 

Thank You Phil

GOD BLESS

 

Schooner

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Hi, Schooner

 

I'm glad you liked the tutorial, and that you feel inspired to try it out.

 

Unfortunately, there really is no easier way to do what you are describing. The steps that I have laid out are the simplest way to apply gold leaf to a carved surface. It may seem complicated, but really it is quite straight forward.

 

The only other method that I could describe would be the water gilding technique, which is MUCH more complicated and time consuming.

 

Phil

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Hi, Schooner

 

I'm glad you liked the tutorial, and that you feel inspired to try it out.

 

Unfortunately, there really is no easier way to do what you are describing. The steps that I have laid out are the simplest way to apply gold leaf to a carved surface. It may seem complicated, but really it is quite straight forward.

 

The only other method that I could describe would be the water gilding technique, which is MUCH more complicated and time consuming.

 

Phil

 

 

Hi Phil

 

You're right your way is the SIMPLIST and right for this newcomer.

 

I remember sometime ago I bought this: Its a MONA LISA PRODUCT called: SIMPLE LEAF & METAL LEAF ADHESIVE ~ I looked on the spray can to see if it was; OIL BASE ADHESIVE ( didn't say) Can I use this Phil ?

 

As far as the gold leaf in this 18 leaf kit ~ I don't know what KT Gold is ?

 

If not please let me know just what I should buy ?

 

O.K. Phil lets start from the beginning ~ I'm in your hands :P

 

GOD BLESS YOU

Ray

a.k.a Schooner

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Hi Ray

 

Thanks for posting your first name. It's always more pleasant to respond to a real person, as opposed to an avatar.

 

The leaf that you are refering to is known in the gilding trade as schlagmetal, and is not really gold at all. It is actually a sort of bronze. The leaves are larger than gold leaf, much thicker, and more brittle as well. It is possible to cover flat surfaces with this metal, but it really isn't suited for intricate carvings. It's possible but trickey.

 

Do you have a gilding supplier in Vegas? There must be someone.

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Hi Ray

 

Thanks for posting your first name. It's always more pleasant to respond to a real person, as opposed to an avatar.

 

The leaf that you are refering to is known in the gilding trade as schlagmetal, and is not really gold at all. It is actually a sort of bronze. The leaves are larger than gold leaf, much thicker, and more brittle as well. It is possible to cover flat surfaces with this metal, but it really isn't suited for intricate carvings. It's possible but trickey.

 

Do you have a gilding supplier in Vegas? There must be someone.

 

Hi Phil

 

In answer to your question aboutt gliding suppliers in Vegas. I bought that little kit from MICHAELS. Its not a specialist store for gold leaf supply's.

 

Questions Phil Please.

 

1. What caret of gold leaf should I buy when I carving angel wings ? The wings will have lots of deafnetion to them .

2. Where is the best place to buy gold leaf for me carving projects ?

 

Thanks Phil

GOD BLESS YOU

Ray :P

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Hi, Ray

 

I would suggest that you contact Sepp Leaf in New York. They can be reached through their website here: http://www.seppleaf.com/ They have a minimum purchase requirement, and may not sell to you directly, but they supply other retailers who will, and they should be able to tell you where the closest place that you could buy leaf would be. I would suggest that you buy 23k leaf, which is sold in books of 25 sheets.

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Hey My Good Man

 

Phil, Thanks eye will look into 2 it.

 

Thanks again 4 your help.

GOD BLESS

 

Ray

Hi, Ray

 

I would suggest that you contact Sepp Leaf in New York. They can be reached through their website here: http://www.seppleaf.com/ They have a minimum purchase requirement, and may not sell to you directly, but they supply other retailers who will, and they should be able to tell you where the closest place that you could buy leaf would be. I would suggest that you buy 23k leaf, which is sold in books of 25 sheets.

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