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Bernard

Coin Cutting

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Hello,

 

I’m looking to give coin cutting a try, it seems very interesting and I’ve seen lots of great designs. The thing is I can’t find any websites that give you a ‘how to’ on coin cutting.

 

From what I’ve gathered:

 

1. You drill through the coin but with what kind of drill and what size drill bits?

2. Then using a piercing saw, cut what you don’t want out. Again what size saw blades are used?

3. Using needle files (again what size?) you tidy the job up

 

A few problem with this simple run through I have is – I’ve seen coins where the detail of the cut is so small, like around the writing of a coin and a whole is cut through the centre of an ‘o’ it’s just so fine a detail. I just don’t understand how that can be done with just the tools I’ve written about above.

 

Also you’ve got the option to grind the coin down and then polish it up to make a blank coin before you cut out your design. What sort of grinder and polisher would be best for this job?

 

Any advice would be great,

 

Thank you.

 

208053494_o.jpg

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1. Small drill bits are avaible at most hobby stores,you need the drill jaws small enough to hold 1/2 mm size drill bits.

 

2.Jeweler's sawblades size 4/0 or 6/0,they are thin and brittle.You will probably break quite a few before you become accustomed to them.

 

3.Fine cut and micro size if you can find them.Little need for files once you become somewhat skilled with the jeweler's saw.

 

Get a sheet of thin brass or copper to practice on before trying coins.You can use a school glue stick to attach a paper pattern to the metal sheet.

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1. Small drill bits are avaible at most hobby stores,you need the drill jaws small enough to hold 1/2 mm size drill bits.

 

2.Jeweler's sawblades size 4/0 or 6/0,they are thin and brittle.You will probably break quite a few before you become accustomed to them.

 

3.Fine cut and micro size if you can find them.Little need for files once you become somewhat skilled with the jeweler's saw.

 

Get a sheet of thin brass or copper to practice on before trying coins.You can use a school glue stick to attach a paper pattern to the metal sheet.

 

Thank you Dan!

 

Could you clear a few things up for me. When you said '1/2 mm drill bits' Did you mean half a mm or one or two mm? Either way could you tell me what sort of drill would be suitable for the job? I've seen a picture of someone using a manual drill but that didn't seem to me, to be very accurate. Will I need a clamp stand for the drill or is it possible to drill free hand? Also could you give me an example of a machine that could grind a coins surface smooth and then polish it too a nice finish.

 

Thank you.

 

P.S Do you have experience cutting coins? It sounds as if you do.

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The drill bits would be half a mm,you just need a hole large enough for the sawblade to pass through. A bench pin would also help for steadying the coin while pierceing.You can use a dremel or almost any type drill that will tighten the drill bit solid.

 

I would not bother trying to sand coins,you can buy copper,brass,nickle silver and stainless steel sheet at most hobby stores or Ace hardware.

 

Take a look at my website listed in my profile,there is a tutorial on pierceing a Japanese arrowhead.

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look at forign coins also,many neat ideas...You can find birds and all kinds of interesting things on coins.the one i bought was a uk coin of albatross cut out and was a pendent.

 

there was a guy who got swine flue eons ago from the vacine and was crippled from encintas,cal that did great work...david i think was his name

 

michele

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I've been doing this for a month or so now, just as a hobby in the winter months (because I play cricket in the summer months) and I never realised just how hard Landlord Insurance is to grasp lol!

 

but it is so much fun as well :) how is yours progressing?

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I used to do a lot of this kind of work and found the more detailed you get with the cutting, the better they look and the more money they will bring. Here are a few tips I can offer to attain the most desirable eye appeal...

 

Start with a decent coin. Avoid excessive polishing so you don't wear down the engraving.

 

Do ALL your drilling first. If you wait to drill out the middle of an "R" after it's cut out, you can tear it out. I would suggest investing in some very small bits of a few sizes for letters and dates. The general rule for blade selection is a minimum of three teeth per thickness of the metal.

 

The small "connectors" that need to be there for support can be cut in such a way they disappear to the eye. If you lean the saw forward, and cut in slightly from both sides to create a sharp ridge just below the field, the individual letters and other elements appear to just float in mid-air.

 

If you have some basic engraving skills, you can also add depth around small dates and other intricate details before piercing to give an illusion of full piercing.

 

You can also add elements such as name or monogram that aren't part of the original design. Again, it helps to have some engraving skills to do this, but can be done without. I used to add stars to some designs, for example. Or, as Dave London suggested, the entire design can be altered like on a Hobo Nickel.

 

All that said, it's also a good idea to stock simpler, more economical pieces if you're trying to build an inventory.

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I am brand spanking new. I am starting a jewelry business and would like to use coins (as wells as beads, shells, wood, etc). I need to drill holes in the coins, and my Dremel battery operated drill just doesn't have the power (it works on the shells!). What type of drill would be best? I know I would need a small drill bit as the largest coin is a Canadian loonie (2 dollar coin) and the smallest is a USA Lincoln penny.

 

any tips would be appreciated

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Welcome Suellen, this is an old thread but since you asked try to get the micro bits like dental bits. My sister got some from work that were too dull for teeth so I clean in alcohol and used. There is also good ones as small as 1/16" at the better suppliers and probably a lot

smaller, I don't know 'cause I don't use that small much. My faves are the 1/8" for beads so I can use a leather cord. Second favorite size is the 3/16" as a pin hole for the tang pin on my knives.

Not to discourage you if you want to pierce, but here is a way you can quickly inset a mercury dime without piecing it. (some made comments when my silver dollars had holes in them)

 

I shaved a bit off a spade bit, I think it was a 5/8" before I narrowed it down to flush fit a dime, shortened the point way down too. Anyway there are a BUNCH of way better suited to answer so I'll get off the box :D Jesse

 

 

post-2-0-63513300-1317411383.jpg

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I am brand spanking new. I am starting a jewelry business and would like to use coins (as wells as beads, shells, wood, etc). I need to drill holes in the coins, and my Dremel battery operated drill just doesn't have the power (it works on the shells!). What type of drill would be best? I know I would need a small drill bit as the largest coin is a Canadian loonie (2 dollar coin) and the smallest is a USA Lincoln penny.

 

any tips would be appreciated

 

Hi suellen

 

as a jeweller/silversmith I use either what is called a "pin vice" it is a small hand held chuck which can accept small various jewellers drill bits with a shank or if you are looking for a machine either look for a pendant motor or use something like a Dremel 300 series as I have one for all my jewellery needs aswell glass engraving sculpting milliput/wax.

 

hope that helps and feel free to pick my brains if you want any help

 

Dave

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