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Guest Clive

Quiz.

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Penisbone! No...

 

But....

 

...after consulting the judges it seems we have a 'sort of' correct answer.

 

Why does it have to be that little prick from England? Phil was close with his Walrus.

 

I found this inside a piece of Mammoth tusk.

The ivory was chalky and useless but to my surprise there was a fossilised core.

Must be the arterys in the pulpal cavity. I thought these were the first to disappear, but on my piece only a small piece of bark and this long nerv system or arterys survived.

 

My piece of tusk:

post-1629-1257420751.jpg

 

Tusk all crumbled showing the core:

post-1629-1257420802.jpg

 

Well done Clive! Thanks all competitors.

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Guest Clive

Personally I'd say I was barely there..

 

Nice one Leon.. its a very interesting item... Teeth and tusks have the same physical structures: pulp cavity , dentine, cementum and enamel. The innermost area is the pulp cavity. The pulp cavity contains the pulp connective tissue in which blood vessels and nerve fibres are embedded, and it is lined with odontoblasts, which produce the dentine.

 

PS.. have you any of the chalky ivory and bark still.. I've an experiment I'd like to try

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Correct.

Did anyone see this before. Why is the ivory lost and this relatively soft tissue not? Most tusk I saw have no core at all or just solid ivory.

 

I used the bark, after hard labour, as a 'desktop-box-lid'. Chalky stuff enough.

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Guest Clive

You might find this helpful..

 

http://www.mindat.org/article.php/179/On+%...ne+Turquoise%22

 

... but the fossilization of soft tissue is indeed very rare... possible scenarios for its formation is suggested here...

 

http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/259/5100/1439

 

I imagine this particular fossil was formed when the entire tusk.. and the animal was buried in soft sediment very quickly.. maybe it fell into a bog, quick sand or tar-pit changing the normal process of decay... ?

 

Ps.. looking forward to receiving my prize.. any idea what you'd like?

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Hippo tooth?

 

Too obvious? Right, I'll get me coat...

 

Actually, this thread's a good idea. It means looking closely at the material - always a good thing.

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Guest Clive

No Freda.. correct.. well done.. but I want more.. whats going on here and why might this section be a interest to a carver?

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Is there a kind of ringed formation on the roughly carved piece to the upper left and is that what the carver's trying to emphasise? If that's the case, I'm trying to puzzle out why it's only at the top. Or is it? Could it be the formation of a tooth/tusk inside the jaw of some big, old, long-dead mammal?

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Guest Clive

Yes.. here are some more pics. Whats interesting about this section is the blob-like areas which are essentially internal cementum have a quality that is different from the normal dentine.. its much softer, creamier.. slighly pinky coloured sometimes and has a ring effect.. very interesting when contrasted with the normal dentine forming the pulp wall .. I'll post some pics when I get round to working it but just wanted to show that with materials.. they not just hippo or mammoth.. but all the subtle variations within those material that make up the overall structure that can be utilized by the artist.

post-2059-1257430748.jpg

post-2059-1257430763.jpg

post-2059-1257430777.jpg

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all the subtle variations within those material that make up the overall structure that can be utilized by the artist.

 

I'm beginning to get the point. I'd seen that with wood and the tagua I'm working on, but hadn't thought about applying it to tusk material.

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Don't let him fool you Freda. This time there is a lot of evidence of Clive glueing things together to fool us!

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Guest Clive
Don't let him fool you Freda. This time there is a lot of evidence of Clive glueing things together to fool us!

 

Yeah it looks kinda that way doesn't it.. but no, that which looks like dried glue is actually the dried residue of your pulp from earlier.. its got a brittle crystal-like quality and easily fakes off... although if I can find a way to stabilize and fix it, it might make an interesting additional quality to a piece.

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Interesting, Clive.

 

Have you seen this structure before with hippo. Unfortunately, I have never worked with hippo, just the north american ivories (mammoth, sperm whale, walrus)

 

Phil

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Guest Clive

Yes Phil.. but its a bit like pearls in oysters.. only a few large incisors have such formations.

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