Jump to content
Mart D

Tips for Dremel or Proxxon

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

I'm an absolute beginner and have just cut some disks out of deer antler.  I'm going to purchase a used Dremel or Proxxon with a flex shaft.  I know a better maker would be best, but I don't think I'll be doing any real detail work with a rotary tool for a long time. Mostly "hogging" and rough work I think.  What I'd like to know is what tips would you recommend for this type of work. I'll be attempting some plain Manju type netsuke, or maybe simple disk shapes with a silver piece set into it. No real design work with the rotary tool.

I'm thinking some rough sanding cylinders , and maybe carbide carving cylinders shaped burr, and round carbide burr.

Am I close?

Thanks,

Mart D

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mart

I do not use a dremel enough to be able to answer your queries.    I am long sighted so even with strong glasses, struggle doing small work.    I have my dremel hanging from a hook in the ceiling, with a drill in the jaws.    I use this to get into places other tools won't go.      I have other cutters which i use as and when

Best of luck

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mart I have a couple Dremel tools ,do some sanding some carving with different cutters, I also have a Foredom wit a foot pedal for speed control ,l use that more than the Dremel tool. As far as the Proxxon tools I do have a small belt sander that works well.

If I was going to buy now a rotary tool I would want one wit a foot pedal with the speed control.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mark a lot of roughing out,I do with sanding drums, corse to fine grit,  with wood I use a reciprocal carver , not dust but shavings and chips. 

The cutters I have for rotary are some HSS and some carbide , most are small, I have a couple 1/4 shank carbide cutters that I use with the Foredom, they are aggressive and remove a lot of wood quickly.  Then for fine detail and finish work I have a 120 bit set of diamond bits from very fine to corse grits. 

Since I mostly work with woods I prefer carving with chisels or knives, a lot quieter and easier to clean up after.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×