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Jim Kelso

Lindsay AirGraver

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Steve Lindsay has been threatening for a while to send me one of his AirGravers to try out. I had a hunch that it would be very dangerous in terms of getting hooked on it and that has proven out.

 

He sent one the Classic Handpieces with PalmControl. I'll post a photo, but you can see all the info

Here

 

It's not my intent to comment on any other power graver available, in this thread, so I'm going to restrict my comments just to Steve's.

 

The action of the PalmControl and the control possible are truely amazing. The absence of the foot pedal took remarkably little getting used to. The ability to adjust the cutting action by the amount of palm pressure becomes second nature. Because of the mechanics, the tool uses MUCH less air than I'm used to, so my compressor was on much less. I didn't time it, but I would guess 1/5 the time. Also the tool is virtually silent when idling, the only sound being the hammer blows when actually cutting.

 

Pricewise, the foot controlled version(which I will try out soon, hopefully) is more in my range at this time and I suspect offers the same control, only requiring foot and hand coordination.

 

After a few test cuts, I felt comfortable to dive into the Maidenhair Fern Pin engraving which is posted elsewhere. All the engraving on this piece was done with this handpiece, from fairly heavy relief chiseling to the delicate veining. I was under time pressure so did not take it to the limit on heavy going, but was very impressed with the range of power available. Here is the pin finished and I will post some pics of work in progress. It measures 2.5 inches across.

post-4-1135038332.jpg

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Here is the tool and the first series of cuts. The metal is shakudo(96%copper/4%gold) which cuts like copper. I went a little light at first just to get into the groove.

I think the tool has a very cool retro/deco look. The sleeve just in front of the brass fittings rotates to adjust the stroke.

post-4-1135038997.jpg

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Here's a shot of some relief being cut with a shallow curved chisel. Chisels are interchangeable quickly and it will accept round or square stock.

 

please feel free to comment or ask questions.

post-4-1135041716.jpg

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Here is the final engraving of the fern showing the modulated cuts in the veining. I found the PalmControl Graver to be extremely comfortable and responsive. It's an overworked cliche to say a tool can become an extention of your hand, but that's the sensation when using this tool. In this pin, the most sensitive cuts are those where the stem branches. These cuts were a dream using this tool.

post-4-1135044254.jpg

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Jim,

thanks for this demonstration. I had heard from others that the airgraver is a great tool, but to see the progress like this provides a lot of insight.

One other thing I realised fom this 'tutorial' is that there are pierced areas in this pin (which I really like by the way). I didn't notice this feature in the previous post (what with the dark background) or in the first photo in this topic.

 

Keep the pictures coming Jim,

-t

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Guest DFogg

That's what I wanted to see Jim.

 

I have no interest in traditional gun engraving, but what you are doing with it is interesting. I am sorry to hear that the Palm Engraver is so good though, now I will start lusting for one. My choice will be a tough one, 100 lb air hammer or air engraver, sort of a macro/micro schism or the craftsman's version of the quantum dilemma.

 

Do you have a closeup of the butterfly?

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Sorry, Don, I can't help with quantum questions. I do have a close-up of the butterfly however.

It is carved copper with an application of 18k gold tube solder.

post-4-1135090175.jpg

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Initially I wasn't going to include this photo as I wanted to keep the discussion on the AirGraver, but in the interest of clarity, and not wanting to mislead anyone, I decided I should include it.

 

The individual fern leaves are all somewhat dished. This could have been done with a combination of a number of different techniques. The dishing could have been carved/engraved with the graver and then stoned to a smooth contour or, as I chose, for time saving, accomplished with burr carving and polishing with rubberized abrasives. To me there was no sacrifice in quality and it speeds the process. The AirGraver was used to clean up all the outlines with a line tool and as previously shown, the shallow curved chisel was used when defining depth close to another leaf.

post-4-1135091346.jpg

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Jim,

Thank you for the demonstration of the air engraver and more so for showing how you created that beautiful pin. What kind of a compressor do you use? I have been thinking of getting an air engraver and a rotaty tool. I have a magnagraver but it is big in the hand and somewhat awkward.

Thank you again,

Dick

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Hi Dick. You're welcome. My compressor is old and noisey and I can't recommend it. When I get around to getting a new one I probably would go with Steve Lindsay's recommendation. There are several on his web site. I haven't researched them so can't make any specific recommendation.

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Here's a shot of some relief being cut with a shallow curved chisel. Chisels are interchangeable quickly and it will accept round or square stock.

 

please feel free to comment or ask questions.

 

 

Hi again Jim,

 

I was just wondering, what kind of steel are the chisels made of? would I be able to carve steel with this tool?

 

I'm interested in getting one of those Lindsay's AirGravers plus the compressor, but my main problem is the voltage, we use 220V and 50Hz.

 

Best regards

 

dagistanli

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Hi again Jim,

 

I was just wondering, what kind of steel are the chisels made of? would I be able to carve steel with this tool?

 

I'm interested in getting one of those Lindsay's AirGravers plus the compressor, but my main problem is the voltage, we use 220V and 50Hz.

 

Best regards

 

dagistanli

 

Hi Dagistanli,

 

I'm using high-speed steel(HSS) that I buy in square and round lengths. Yes, this will engrave steel. You can see examplesHere

 

You can see a discussion of graver material under "Tools & Materials" >Gravers.

 

It is only the compressor that uses electricity so that would have to be your correct voltage. The graver needs only the air.

 

Cheers, Jim

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Hi Dagistanli,

 

I'm using high-speed steel(HSS) that I buy in square and round lengths. Yes, this will engrave steel. You can see examplesHere

 

You can see a discussion of graver material under "Tools & Materials" >Gravers.

 

It is only the compressor that uses electricity so that would have to be your correct voltage. The graver needs only the air.

 

Cheers, Jim

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Hi Jim. James Whitehead here.This is my first post. I really don't what I'm doing but here goes. Your pin is outstanding. On the Lindsay aie graver. I haven't used one as the price is out if my reach, but I've only heard good things about it. I also think Steve lindsay is one of the finest engravers ther is. I use the GRS graver max and have for a number of years. I have no complants about it. I use a compreser that is supper quiet. It was a bit expensive, but I bought it when I was working as a bench jeweler. I also use a stero microscope as my eye sight isn't what it was. Most of the time I use the gravermax and I use carbide gravers and shapen them with diamond wheels. I polish the carbide gravers with the GRS power hone and cerramic discs. I still use hand push gravers with tool steel and also high speed steel and momax cobolt steel. I think I've enclosed a photo of a lock back knife blade I'v been working on. I'm no to sure if it will work but here goes. Again great work Jim Whitehead

post-96-1135179163.jpg

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Thanks for checking in Jim. I've used the GraverMax for years also. It's a fine tool. Just to keep on topic, I've opened up a new thread for general discussion on air driven gravers(or others). I'd like to keep this thread focused on the Lindsay tools. Could we hear about your compressor on the new thread? Also, what kind of microscope are you using? The lockback is coming along nicely.

 

Thanks, Jim

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Well I'm really anxious to give it a try! I got one a couple days ago and the compressor is suppose to arrive today! (it got held up, grrrrrr) anyway I'm glad you posted this Jim and your pin is Very nice! I'll let you know how it goes. It's a very beautiful tool, and Steve is a very nice guy to talk with and very helpful. When the compressor didn't show he was on the phone with my wife! he had been tracking its progress, talk about service! Just Outstanding!

 

Rik

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Is this tool for working metal only? Very hard and dense wood, mammoth tusk, antler, tooth, might it work with them also?

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Well I'm really anxious to give it a try!  I got one a couple days ago and the compressor is suppose to arrive today! (it got held up, grrrrrr)  anyway I'm glad you posted this Jim and your pin is Very nice!  I'll let you know how it goes. It's a very beautiful tool, and Steve is a very nice guy to talk with and very helpful.  When the compressor didn't show he was on the phone with my wife!  he had been tracking its progress, talk about service!    Just Outstanding! 

 

Rik

 

That's great Rik! Have fun. Steve will not rest until you're happy.

:D

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Is this tool for working metal only?  Very hard and dense wood, mammoth tusk, antler, tooth, might it work with them also?

 

Yes, Janel, it will work with those materials either with gravers or small carving tools that would have to be made or modified to fit in the chuck(3/32" or smaller square and 1/8" or smaller round).

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Hi Jim,

After the first of the year I need to buy some tools for my studuo. I have allways lusted after an air driven engraving tool. The Lindsay equipment seems to be what I need. I was thinking of a handpiece (not the PalmControl, more than I can spend) a Microscope and a compressor. Lindsay has a good price on a compressor when bought with the handpiece. Do you or anyone else have any thoughts on the subject. What would be better the 3/8 or 5/16 handpiece? Help would be very welcome.

Dick

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Hi Dick,

 

That's great! I think you'll be very happy with the tools.

 

I think you might find the 3/8" bore most useful as it has a little more top end power. That would be my choice.

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