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Jim Kelso

Lindsay AirGraver

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Hi Dick,

I think you sound pretty well covered. Engraving is such a personal skill. Our tool selection grows as need dictates. I did wonder if you have an engraver's vice. Solid work-holding is essential.

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Hi Jim,

You are right I will have the basics. I have two engravers vices. A heavy ball suitable for guns and a smaller 1890 patent jewelers rotating ball for small pieces.

Thanks,

Dick

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Sometime before Christmas Steve sent me the heel/toe control version with the Classic Handpiece to compare with the PalmControl version. I decided I couldn't do a more fair comparison than to repeat the pin engraved earlier. Actually, the alloy used in the second pin is shibuichi(70% copper/ 30%silver) which is somewhat tougher than the shakudo used in the first pin, but frankly, it didn't even seem to be a factor. (see photo below)

 

Both tools I have to say are an engraver's dream. I had sort of prepared myself to be a little underwhelmed after using the palm control as it is magical in it's response and simplicity. I have to say though that the foot control has become second nature to me because of my long history using the GRS products, so it actually felt just as responsive and comfortable as the PalmControl. It is the most responsive, predictable and sensitive foot control I have used. The response and sensitivity in both tools are remarkable. I can't really say that, without question, I would prefer one to the other. The PalmControl does have the advantage of being able to be controlled either way.

 

The remarkably wide range of impact power in both handpieces is, I understand, the same, and is mostly varied, very conveniently, with a rotating sleeve right on the handpiece.

post-4-1139532435.jpg

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Before engraving the pin I tried it out on a bit tougher shibuichi (60cu/40silver) just to see how deep I could go. It compared favorably with the heavier GRS handpiece I have. (photo of test piece). You can also see in the photo a range of cuts from very small to quite hefty.

post-4-1139533067.jpg

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Thanks for the Video link. Watching that reminded me of the first time I seen and engraver at work It was in the early 60s and I watched an ederly man wit chasing hammer and hand helt gravers working on a hand gun. He moved as fast as the one in the video. From a wood carver who would love to do that kind of work All I can say Impressive.

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JIM KELSO-- Amigo Mio- You have done me a good turn. Thanks for the heads up on STEVES site. I had been there before, but he has added A LOT of GOOD stuff since I was last there .

 

For a beginning engraver he has done a nice service. I much appr. it and If I get good enough and decide I am going to like this engraving, I will get a Palm engraver.

 

I have already told a couple of spur/buckle-making buddys about his Palm.

 

Thanks

 

Chuck

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Hi, Jim.

I allways admire your art pieces.

After reading your comment on Lindsay's AirGraver, I want to have the Classic Hand piece.

The Palm control is too much for me now.

But I want to know more before place an order for it.

My question is how to set the stroke per minute , the power of the stroke and the lengh of the stroke?

Best regards.

Yloh

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Hi Yloh,

There are two ways to adjust the stroke. The foot pedal and the adjustment collar which opens and closes air ports in the body. Here is a quote from Steve's website:

 

"The length of stroke adjustment collar on the Classic handpiece provides a multitude of hand pieces in one tool. At any given stroke length setting, the power is varied with air pressure from the foot control or PalmControl (.5psi to 60psi). The absence of an internal spring means uniform performance throughout the range, with no sweet spots or non-working spots. The full range of power and speed is consistent throughout due to the internal automatic balance of air pressure on both the impact and return strokes."

 

Hope this is helpful.

 

Jim

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