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Guest ford hallam

Metal carving chisels

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Guest ford hallam

Hi gang ;)

 

I'm still working on getting all the ( clearly focused! ) images and details of chisels together but in the meantime I thought you might be interested to see these 2 views of the angle of cutting using a 'V' shaped kebori chisel. It's moved with a hammer. I'd previously said ( in response to a query from Greg Obach) there were no heels on this chisel, sorry Greg!, I lied :) I didn't think of it but there is a slight heel on this one. The next batch of images will reveal all. Also, do you think the black and white images are sufficient? I though they'd make a relief from all the full colour we're constantly exposed to.

 

 

 

 

regards, Ford

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Hi gang :)

 

I'm still working on getting all the ( clearly focussed! ) images and details of chisels together but in the meantime I thought you might be interested to see these 2 views of the angle of cutting using a 'V' shaped kebori chisel. It's moved with a hammer. I'd previously said there were no heels on this chisel, sorry!, I lied ;) I didn't think of it but there is a sleight heel on this one. The next batch of images will reveal all. Also, do you think the black and white images are sufficient? I though they'd make a relief from all the full colour we're constantly exposed to.

 

 

 

 

regards, Ford

 

 

I like the black and white. It reduces file size without the loss of detail and has nice look and feel about it when depicting raw metals. A thought, the chisel and the base metal blend too well in Black and white. If you don't know what your looking at it might be slightly confusing. In the lower photo you might communicate more by moving the chisel tip out of the cut and letting it rest on the surface next the bur. But still have it propped up at the correct orientation for making the cut.

Patrick

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Guest ford hallam

Thanks chaps, :)

 

Patrick, your comment about backing the chisel up is a good point. I did actually take a shot like that but did'nt process it. next time :)

 

Hi Greg, thanks, I try to keep things pretty ;)

 

namaste, Ford

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Hi ,

 

can you talk the basic size of the chisels, for buy the bars ex: 6"long for 1/2 ,

 

I can try make inaly silver on iron tsuba in simple lines to beginer,

 

Thanks again,

 

Remo

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Remo,

 

I'll get some details on the chisels posted as soon as I can.

 

here are the same images in colour. Any thoughts on the difference?

 

regards, Ford

Edited after The following comments by Janel, these are the newer versions of the images adjusted as per her suggestion. thanks Janel

 

 

 

 

 

right that it, no more fiddling ;) .

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Quite a change in looks! The chisel looks like a warm colored metal, so to see what could happen, I put a photo into Photoshop and used the gray eyedropper to change the white balance to make the gray gray, and found a real flesh color on your finger that way, and differentiated the metals one from another. It also made the metal disk turn from gold into copper. :lol: That was a great reduction in $$ for the raw material, at a click of the finger! :) :)

 

Lighting and white balance settings, between sources, fluorescent, incandescent, daylight infiltration... ;) tricky and confusing stuff for the Photography area. Here is an excerpt of the above color image after WB adjustment. Is this closer to the real thing?

 

fh_jjWB.jpg edited color balance further: fh_jjWB2.jpg

 

 

P.S. I have fun trying to imagine how you take the photo while your hands on tools! I use that two section Nikon Coolpix 4500, which is really handy for such "self portraits", since the display can rotate to a viewing position. Strange little beast, but a great little photo tool.

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Janel,

 

spot on, I don't have jaundice after all...and I was worried! :) . I did'nt go back to alter the light at all, I was so fixated on the whole compression issue :) . Now to combine it all.

The disc isn't copper though so in your image it's too pink, it's shibuichi, much paler/yellower.

Edit added after changing the images, Janel, I think your colour combination works better after all. I don't have photoshop but I'll see what I can do.

thanks, Ford

 

Oh! and I'm operating the camera with my feet ;) .

Actually, I'm shooting tethered via my laptop and I have a wireless mouse just to the side of my right hand. The things I do for you guys! :lol:

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Remo,

 

did you check out the tutorial I posted specifically on wire inlay, I think you may find all you need there. ;)

Here's a link.

Ford

 

p.s. Tom,

 

I know it's probably a load of work but would it be possible to move the various metal related tutorials to this section? I think they may otherwise get overlooked ,particularly by new-comers to the forum.

 

And Hi Dan M,

 

did you get to that wire inlay project you had planned? I'd love to know how you got on. You asked, over on the wire inlay tutorial, if I would include an enlarge option on my site. You'll be pleased to learn that I will be, so you can see as much as you want.

 

Cheers, Ford

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I pushed the color balance a little further in the above post. I don't know what I am aiming for, but yellower, not pinker helped. Now if we all had the same monitors, we would have something we could count on for stable color representation!

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Guest ford hallam

I think the final version, where you pushed the colour balance, is the best representation. :) I'll do better next time, promise ;)

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Hi Ford,

 

I still have the wire inlay project in the works when i can find time to work on it. i have a bunch of O-1 drill rod to make the tools now and need to decide how the cutting point needs to be shaped. then a bit of practice time with the tools before starting on the tsuba.here is a photo of the base tsuba,it will be 3.25 inches in diameter.

 

tsuba022a.jpg

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Which chisel shape is used for katakiri-bori?

The descriptions I've read seem to imply it's the V-bottom one as above, but that shape does not seem ideal for very fine lines or very broad, even when keeled over...i.e. great mid-range but little top or bottom end control - is it just that different size tools are required even within one katakiri 'drawing?' Somehow that seems unlikely...

:huh:

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Which chisel shape is used for katakiri-bori?

The descriptions I've read seem to imply it's the V-bottom one as above, but that shape does not seem ideal for very fine lines or very broad, even when keeled over...i.e. great mid-range but little top or bottom end control - is it just that different size tools are required even within one katakiri 'drawing?' Somehow that seems unlikely...

:huh:

 

Kata kiri bori Uses a flat chisel tilted to one side. The depth and angle of the cut changes the width of the line. I am sure Ford will go over this one in detail at some point.

Patrick

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Gents,

 

I've been drawing up some diagrams of the basic chisel shapes, angles etc all indicated, as in a technical drawing format. I'll try and get it all up tomorrow.

Looks like you got quite a lot of piercing work lined up there Dan, I look forward to seeing it completed. It already looks impressive. ;)

 

Jeff,

kata-kiri is done with a chisel like the one resting on the hammer below.

 

and here is a very basic "technical drawing", the one's I'm doing will be better, I promise!

The angle between the cutting face generally ranges from 50 to 60degrees. The width is variable as are the relative lengths of the 2 faces. The chisels ( kiri-tagane ) are usually between 3 to 4 inches in length ( 75 to 100 mm ) it obviously depends on personal preference and the purpose you have in mind for the tool.

 

 

This diagram ( and the others I'm redoing to make more understandable for non technical minds :huh: ) comes from a work-sheet used by the students at the Tokyo School of Art.

 

hope this helps for now.

 

p.s. Hi Patrick!, sorry mate, didn't see you there. Now we need a way to be more aware of who's here with us...and then activate the live chat....then live video feed...and then all meet in a bar near Aloha Karl's place. ;-)

 

cheers, Ford

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Aloha Ford,

 

Apologies for not acknowledging what you are doing here. (Another) belated thanks. Metalwork is pulling me in all directions!

Just a note that Jim posted a diagram of chisels a while back in reference to engraving. I'm guessing from TUFA?

 

...and then all meet in a bar near Aloha Karl's place. ;)

 

Hey, I got just the place, Duke's at The Moana. Edge of Waikiki, toes in the sand, babes (and hunks) lined up on towels, surf in front of you, koa rockers, mile high Mai Tais and a shady banyan tree...I'll be waiting. :huh:

 

Karl

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Karl,

 

yes, the diagram Jim posted is the one I'm using and It is from TUFA. I was wondering who the hell TUFA was...then I clicked, Tokyo University of Fine Art :) ) The diagrams are very clear, if you are used to technical drawings but if notk, I think they can be a bit confusing, at least that's what some people have told me. So, I'm redoing them...we have the technology! :huh:

 

that bar of yours sounds just the spot to hold the Inaugural Metal Bashers International Beach Exposition ( also known as IMBIBE ;) )

 

I'll be there :(

 

Aloha, Ford

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