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  1. Yesterday
  2. Janel

    how do you de-grease bone?

    Yay! Phew, I am glad that it worked. Let us know how things progress with the bone preparation. Janel
  3. Last week
  4. Andrew V

    how do you de-grease bone?

    Thanks Janel, I did as you suggested and put 'the carving path prepare bone' into a search engine and came up with several very useful threads
  5. Janel

    how do you de-grease bone?

    There are methods for preparing bone in the archives. Using the search function is unwieldy, but with enough patience the best suggestions will form a pattern with the shared information from over the years. You might also try using a Search Engine like google, etc., mentioning The Carving Path, which would target the information in the forum as well. In the archives there are many topics regarding the preparation of bone, and many other informational topics and posts about the selection and use of bones. I found this one that might be helpful: https://www.thecarvingpath.net/topic/3123-bones-that-had-been-cleaned-all-cracked/?tab=comments#comment-25210 One takeaway from it is to not cook the bone, and read about the various degreasing agents. Cooking might tend to force the fats into the bone, in my opinion. Good luck to your investigation, preparation and carving of the bone! Janel
  6. Janel

    Hello!

    Hello Tim, Your first attempt is a very elegant one. Your choice to create an inset for the engraved copper works visually as well as functionally, making a sleek profile that lays flat. Welcome! Janel
  7. Earlier
  8. ukjohn

    how do you de-grease bone?

    Although I have never degreased bone, I understand that it needs to be boiled for a long time and that it stinks the house out!!!
  9. Hi Everyone. I'm prepping a marrow bone for inlay work. I have stripped it of meat but its quite heavily contaminated by grease. Any tips on how to de-grease the bone? Currently its soaking in a strong sugar-soap solution. Thanks, Andrew
  10. Tim Zowada

    Hello!

    Hello! It looks like I'm the new guy here. My name is Tim Zowada I have been making custom knives professionally since 1982. I specialize in forged blades, Damascus steel and home smelted bloomery steel. I have known Jim Kelso for a very long time. I have always been captivated by his work. I have finally come to the place where I can start experimenting with carving and engraving. I have a lot to learn. But, I can see there is a lot of great information on this forum. Here is my first attempt at this sort of work: Blade: Home smelted Timahagane and meteorite with pine branch engraving. Scales: Mammoth ivory with Copper pine cone. I look forward to all the opportunities here. If anyone ever needs help with forging steel, please don't hesitate to ask. Thank you, Tim Zowada
  11. Members have been reporting log in problems. The forum Support team is helping me to sort this out. Some software upgrades and the addition of SSL may have been making logging in troublesome. 1) From forum Support: Please ask them to make certain they are using the new URL which contains https like so: https://www.thecarvingpath.net/ and not using a link which their browser has "remembered" which might be the old http link. 2) You may need to use your Display Name as the username when logging in. 3) If you have trouble logging in, please contact me. Let me know what you are using to log in with unsuccessfully. I will work with the forum Support to try to figure this out. Janel
  12. Janel

    Log In Problems?

    Members have been reporting log in problems. The forum Support team is helping me to sort this out. Some software upgrades and the addition of SSL may have been making logging in troublesome. 1) From forum Support: Please ask them to make certain they are using the new URL which contains https like so: https://www.thecarvingpath.net/ and not using a link which their browser has "remembered" which might be the old http link. 2) You may need to use your Display Name as the username when logging in. 3) If you have trouble logging in, please contact me. Let me know what you are using to log in with unsuccessfully. I will work with the forum Support to try to figure this out. Janel
  13. Paul T

    Need cane strength wood with angle

    Awww man.... you made me think! Now I have to consider a composite piece, cause it looks so well done!
  14. Gary G.

    Need cane strength wood with angle

    It sounds like your hoping to find a suitable piece of found wood to use to use as a cane? If so this will depend what trees/bush that you have access to locally were you live. Steam or heating to bend a handle really is a option only with thinner shanks. The thicker the material the more difficult it becomes to bend the wood without imparting splits in the wood. The photo of the Diamond Willow bent cane already had a bend that I added too to make it usable, but it was less than a inch in diameter across. A common way to have a curve/bend at the top of a cane is cut a shank [branch] from a tree that includes a large section of the tree's trunk at the end of the shank [branch][see video link below], which is shaped down into a handle, this may work for you. As I understand it you carve antler as well, a carved antler handle on top of a cane is another type of cane to explore [see my photo's]. I really like Diamond Willow [Bebbs Willow] for longer hiking / walking sticks, if you have access to it? The heart wood is strong and carves well. Here locally I use Windsor Plywood for my store bought exotic woods, here you can get any size of wood and type of wood that suits your needs. cheers gary Great video on stick straightening Great video how to attach a handle --- Thanks to woodlandsticks for sharing his knowledge, I recommend all of Dave Slater's videos. A overview of steam bending
  15. Paul T

    My Intro (Captain Creaky)

    He should have been supervised, but I was busy with another voice.
  16. Janel

    Help a member find images please?

    Thank you for reminding me about this. I did locate the person and eventually received the images for what I believe had been requested. "Here are two images of the pump set up that we've cobbled together. The covington unit above the pump has a drip feed and the water drains out from the side through the large tube & depends on gravity to settle the sludge."
  17. Janel

    My Intro (Captain Creaky)

    Welcome to The Carving Path. Um maybe except for the teddy bear ... poor thing.
  18. Janel

    Sealing Bone (Finish)

    Hi Paul, Thank you! I have a selection of old dental tools, actually acquired the first ones at the St. Paul, MN Science Museum that had been roughly ground into very interesting, useful tools. They were then called amateur archeology tools, as I recall. I gave them attention on my whet and diamond stones, and used them a lot before making other sorts of tools. Never thought of river stones, good idea. Janel
  19. I've an itching to make anew cane, but cannot seem to find a piece of strong enough that has the bend at the top for the grip that is also thick enough to carve into a wrap around the hand whilst held. I can work with almost any species of wood and strongly prefer solid pieces. Any source you would recommend? I'm also looking for a piece long enough to turn into a 6' walking stick... covered with faces.
  20. Paul T

    Sealing Bone (Finish)

    Well done tools BTW. Another cheap old guy hint - ask your dentist for tools that are too worn to bother re-edging for patient use. I've gotten some really fine things that take a n edge grandly for my materials. And keep your eyes open for fine river stones to help edge and polish.
  21. Paul T

    Sealing Bone (Finish)

    I've been bone carving for a while and agree 100%. Ancient peoples and craftsmen all over do the same and I've held pieces over 1000 years old and stuff done just 20 years ago -keep it oiled with your hands and it can last. The only nod I give to modern techniques is a thin spray of poly to keep my clumsy from leaving scratches.
  22. Paul T

    My Intro (Captain Creaky)

    Age: add in mileage and I have air beat. Race: Human... in theory. USMC 82-90 Married, 3 critters, all out of the house... my wife replaced them with cats and dogs. Carving: Woods and bone. I also do a lot of other crafty type stuff like leather work, calligraphy, artsy things. Been making my own sealing wax for a while, as well as stains for stuff. Disney holic and dirty old guy who strongly believes Children and laughter are sacred things. I also love free stuff... and have very little shame about begging.
  23. dondougan

    How do you hold your work while roughing?

    By the way; I came across a number of these tools posted on the internet — mostly to show the user-crafted attachments they had made, but a few used ones were listed as for sale on ebay for half of the list price or less -- but usually over $100 US. I think Wilton started making these back in the 1940s. Many of the postings were from gunsmiths and they all have the Pow-R-Arm permanently attached to their workbenches. In addition to the hydraulic version Wilton makes (or made) a slightly less-expensive version with a lever-arm mechanical locking device. There are also similar tools made by other manufacturers, generally somewhat smaller in scale, mechanically locked, and supplied with a ready-to-use bracket for attaching your wood carving block (seems to be aimed at the duck decoy carver market).
  24. dondougan

    How do you hold your work while roughing?

    A ‘new’ holding tool for the studio. About twenty years ago I was given a brand new tool (first image - manufactured circa mid-1960′s) still in the original cardboard box but without any paperwork. I had seen one of these holding devices when I was an undergraduate and put it on my maybe-someday (when I have lots of money) list of tools to buy. So when I was given a thirty-year-old but never-been-used Pow-R-Arm I was excited. I went out and bought some hydraulic oil to fill the piston chamber and then discovered the two rubber seals were dry-rotted and the piston would not hold pressure. After checking the local hardware and plumbing stores for replacement seals to no avail I sent a letter with a drawing of the seals to Wilton asking for replacement parts for the #303 and never got a reply. Shortly after I packed the tool up put it on a bottom shelf in the studio and forgot about it. Twenty years later dealing with a small termite infestation in the studio I had to take out some old wooden shelves and rediscovered the tool under about a half-inch of dust. After taking care of the termite problem I decided I might try to re-engineer the Pow-R-Arm tool and make it work with some machined clamping since the hydraulic was not workable, and added a couple of mechanical screw locks on the pivoting ball. But I also decided to try for replacement parts from Wilton again, but this time on the internet — a resource which I had not had twenty years ago. Sure enough, I was able to find the tool (current price brand new a bit over $430) and the page indicated replacement parts were available but the parts web-links on the Wilton site did not work. I called their customer service department up and a very patient and diligent employee spent about 45 minutes while I was on the phone to figure out what was wrong with their website and help me. He couldn’t fix the website, but he did finally dig out a paper copy of the parts-list (last printed in 1973) to get the part number for the replacement seals so I could order them. The parts with shipping and handling charges included were about $70. Pretty steep, but after all the time invested on the phone I figured if I could get my ‘free’ $430 tool working it would be worth it, so I ordered the parts and waited for them to arrive. Meanwhile, as the tool comes from the factory ‘as-is’ it is not usable as a holding device — no sort of clamping jaws or brackets included except for the two threaded holes in the pivoting bracket to accept a pair of 5/16″ bolts. These two bolts are intended to attach user-made custom-fabricated brackets to hold to the workpiece. The brackets are custom-made to suit the specific holding needs of the end user of the tool — some users attach a small machinist’s vise, others attach a wooden-jawed handscrew, or others weld-up custom brackets with holes for attaching the work piece with screws. As I planned on using the tool to hold a variety of small sculptural workpieces (from netsuke-sized carvings to full-size wearable wooden masks with weights less than 10 lbs. each) I did all of above, as well as made a ten-inch extension arm for use with the three screw-on brackets I’d made to hold wood for carving. The netsuke-carving bracket was made from an old chrome-plated zinc-alloy plumbing fitting. I also made a larger/heavier base (laminated a 2-inch thick marble slab between sheets of plywood, with 2x4 feet) to increase the overall tool weight by 25 lbs. so the tool would be stable even if not screwed down to the benchtop (I have three worktables in my studio so I wanted it portable). After using it a couple of times I modified the handscrew so it could be inserted into the vise without slipping by cutting a groove in the butt end to fit over the vise jaw slide -- this allowed for quick changes between soft jaw work or using the steel vise jaws. I also glued some leather tips on the handscrew jaws to soften the clamp for when working delicate materials — like the alabaster rabbit. Fabricated as well was a bracket similar to the netsuke bracket but with a larger faceplate. Designing and fabricating the parts out of material already in the studio took me about three days, and by the time I’d finished the modifications the seals arrived. Installed them and I had a great new piece of studio equipment. Sure wish I had it to use twenty years ago …
  25. dondougan

    Help a member find images please?

    www.thecarvingpath.net/topic/2868-whats-on-your-bench/ scroll to the last post by Lachlan (pix attached below)
  26. Janel

    Imperial rhodonite chain

    I can understand the time that it takes for sanding and polishing. One must especially draw upon patience during this stage to achieve the final, flawless gleam.
  27. michael B

    Imperial rhodonite chain

    Thanks Janel, it is very translucent, a very challenging carving, rhodonite is not as tough as jade and is more prone to fracture, but this piece is the best I have carved, still quite surprised it stayed in one piece, the next stage is sanding and polishing, takes easily as long as the rough carving stage.
  28. Janel

    Imperial rhodonite chain

    Hello Michael, You have succeeded in carving the chain! Such patience and restraint you have especially as the materials become thinner. This stone is such a lovely color and appears to be translucent as well. Thank you for posting the images. Janel
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