Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Last week
  2. Earlier
  3. Andrew V

    New year

    Happy New Year everybody! Still alive, still wood-working, hoping to do some actual carving soon, starting to twitch from a lack of carving time!!
  4. Janel

    New year

    Hi Ed, Thank you and Happy New Year to you as well! I've been deeply focused on learning and creating an annual update to a large web site that I build for a group every year. This is a big on though because I am leaving the comfort of the old software for the modern platform/template site-building technology. It is almost done. I also have tried to have some studio time, but maybe that begins tomorrow. I also hope that folks will latch back on to posting, sharing and helping those who need answers. The forum was created for such purposes for people who carve in a small scale. An anniversary is around this time as well ... the forum began in 2005. 15 years of accumulated knowledge exists here for anyone to read and learn from. Keep your tools sharp and cut away from your flesh! Janel
  5. Janel

    Rocks in My Head

    Hello John, Thank you for your introduction! Hello Debbie and welcome back! I am so excited to see the work that you have been doing! Thank you both for posting about your work and what it is you hope to be doing. Thank you Debbie for offering helpful information. Janel
  6. John: I have used the silver marks-a-lot, but mostly the white grease pencil I mentioned above on darker stones. Also, pencil marks show up pretty well on black stones; the lines shine. The one thing good about carving stone is that you get to make your mistakes very slowly. Sounds funny, but it's true. In wood, it's far easier to overcut. Since you know how to carve wood already, you're going to do just fine. Regarding where to start, I always go from large to small, so I'd start at the outside and then work down to the smaller areas. Odsidian cuts like butter (in the stone world) so you'd get a better idea of how the material works where you have more margin for error. Just go for it; obsidian is cheap and easy to procure and carve so if you mess it up it's not that big of a deal. I have noticed that I have a little more trouble with the change in perspective or proportions in harder stone than I do with softer ones or wood. I carve a lot of faces and have noticed that I have a more difficult time with them in stone than I did in wood. General advice: These tools will be your best friends; an inverted cone diamond bur and a diamond or tungsten steel scribe. The inverted cone makes far better curved lines than a straight bur. The scribe can be used to give you a "starter" line that your burs will follow more easily in small detailed areas than trying to use a bur alone. Both the inverted cone and the scribes can be used to undercut, which gives you the nice shadow line. I don't know if you have used a flex-shaft very much, or rotary tools, but it's different than using hand tools. You'll adapt. I always brace my hand on the piece I carve using my little finger and ring finger as the brace which allows me to make small moves with my thumb, index and middle finger which are holding the handpiece. I found that the smaller handpiece worked better for me than the large one; I got hand cramps using the big one. I also have found that I often move the carving with my left hand against the burs rather than the other way around. Let me know if you have any questions as you go on; I'll try to make a habit of checking every few days to see if you do; I'm also checking the "Notify me of replies" again, I hope it works this time. Debbie P.S. You can make a tungsten scribe out of a broken tungsten drill bit. I ground it down on a wheel and cleaned it up on stones and bought a holder at a jewelers supply place (they have little collets and the tighten down on round tools).
  7. Ed Twilbeck

    New year

    Happy New Year. Wishing everyone a happy new year, and hopping that more come back to the Carving Path. Hope to see everyone here posting.
  8. John S

    Rocks in My Head

    Debbie, thanks for your thoughtful post. I appreciated your helpful comments - especially regarding the bort, which I know little about. I will certainly add this to my workshop. I can relate to your comments on soapstone. I always use a respirator and face protection when I carve. I have a downdraft table with dual fans and filters behind it. I have enclosed the table (actually an old desk which I modified) with a plexiglass shroud on four sides. I run not one but two air filtration units in my garage/shop, and of course the old reliable shop vac for general dust management. I only use power tools for the initial roughing out of the stock material - and still the dust is overwhelming. My conclusion relative to the dust supports your own experience! However, since soapstone is so soft it allows me to prototype designs and work on aspects of technique. Since obsidian and other harder material is readily available in Oregon I am striving to learn how to work with this material. I am practicing with basswood and soapstone to develop a small (2" dia. ) ammonite replica and need to cut a few slabs of obsidian for my project. Cutting the basic round shape from the slab is relatively straightforward, but carving the spiraling curves of the ammonite itself is presently challenging. I need to determine how much to "oversize" my spirals in order to shape them properly. I am trying to approximate a Fibonocci sequence in defining their progression. Another thing I am trying to determine is the selection of a good reference point for my carving. For example, in carving waterfowl from wood blanks one learns quickly to use the bird's bill as a reference point for scale. I think on an ammonite one can either start at "the beginning" - which is the small circular part at the very center of the shell - or at the very end or "occupied" part of the shell. In either case the spirals work to the opposite end in a formal sequence of curves. Thus far working from the center out seems to make the most sense and it "feels" right to me. Finally, your remarks on marking up the raw stone are much appreciated as well. I use a traditional pencil for center lines and a sharpie to define basic cut lines. Have you tried using a special colored pen - silver, bright yellow etc. - on darker stone? I do tend to get lost in the weeds when in comes to accuracy - part of me wants to be as realistic as possible, while part of me likes working with representation and abstraction. Experimenting in expendable materials will hopefully help me to find my comfort zone in this regard, while fooling around with the rock itself will help me to learn more about the material and ways to work with it. I appreciate your comments and hope you will not feel shy about offering more! Regards, John
  9. John: I used to be a pretty active member of this forum, but haven't been on for years. I carve gemstones and have for many years. This is what I do: http://dlskdesigns.com/ Always use a tool with a flexible shaft and water. You always carve stone with water or oil to keep down the dust, as it causes silicosis. I have found that I end up doing much of the work by hand. I use diamond files and then razor blades with diamond powder (bort) of various grades with oil to smooth out the diamond bur marks, along with popsicle sticks, toothpicks, etc. I also make brass burs to use with the bort and oil. Tungsten carbide gravers will also mark most stones of 7 hardness or less. The bort is available on Amazon and Jade Carver. I have not been happy with sintered burs, they shatter the more crystalline material ; I like the cheap plated ones and the diamond dental burs. Do not start with agate, as it will be very discouraging. It's the hardest to carve of all the quartz and it'll wear out your tools. Obsidian is a far better stone to begin with. I'd also recommend going a little smaller. Larger stones take a long time to carve and three times as long to polish. I use a marks-a-lot or pencil to draw on light stones, and a white grease pencil (china marker, available at hobby stores in the art section) to draw designs. The grease pencil is messy but better than nothing. I got a notification of your post; hopefully I'll get one of your reply. Good luck with your first hard rock carving. P.S. I will NEVER carve soapstone again. It raises too much dust and I inhaled some of it and couldn't breathe right for months. Most of it (and some serpentine and tiger eye quartz) has asbestos in it. Malachite can make you very ill, it has some type of copper (I forget what form) in it that's killed a lot of carvers in Africa. Stay away from Cinnabar (mercury) and Cerrusite (lead). Debbie K
  10. By way of introduction I am an experienced (based on longevity and persistence, not talent) wood carver who is extremely interested in stone carving with power and hand tools. I am particularly interested in working with obsidian and agates, but aside from general "How To" books I've not found a good source of reference material for working with these types of stone. (I really don't need any more material that covers basic safety and shop protocol.) I've worked with moderate success with soapstone and pipestone, and feel ready to work with the harder materials. i am using a RAM microtool, a Foredom rotary tool, and of course a Dremel 4000. I also have a good selection of rifflers, files, and sanding tools. My chief problem is finding other carvers with more experience and similar interests, so I am excited about finding this forum. For my first project I am attempting to carve a small (2 inch diameter) ammonite. I am "prototyping" in wood to get a sense of the design and proportion issues, but the differences in carving wood and stone are somewhat daunting. I tend to be drawn toward realism as opposed to abstraction in my carving. I also suspect that my diamond burr selection is too "low end" and therefore need ultimately to upgrade to better burrs. I hope to reach a point where displaying my efforts is more than an embarassment. I look forward to contributing as well as learning from the many skilled artisans who frequent the site.
  11. Hello Steve T, It is good to see your new work and to read of your scoring new tools! I never thought of asking for the drill bits, only the hand scrapers that I would adapt into hand tools. I will keep your suggestion in mind. It could be interesting. Are the shafts different than standard bits? Janel
  12. So I've been carving again, and this is my newest. I have a new favorite tool, On my last dentist visit I asked if I could have some of the old dental bits. The Dentist was only too please to empty out her drawer and I now have a stack of varied bits. So I purchased the Fordem H8.D handset with a collet that works for the dental bits. It's amazing the fine edges you can get with the dental bits. Anyway this carving is one of my signature Maori/Celtic mashups. Completed in Bovine bone and about 50mm (2") long. I'm working on a cord for it now but it will be 4 strand hand plaited 4ply waxed linen thread. Ive ben having a nice run and sold 3 carvings in the last week.
  13. I believe that the tips might be solid for a way towards the main stalk. The thickest part should have marrow-like pith matrix. If it is not in objectionable condition, such material is sometimes incorporated into the concept that one is carving. It takes some fore-thought. Janel
  14. hollow, well, filled with a useless pith you will need to remove, suggest you soften it with warm water
  15. Slow ,but I am looking , for what I can find. Have some ideas. One question. Is the body of Antler solid or , are they hollow? Ready to cut a section, and keeping the end to make a small pendant.
  16. How is it going with the antler?
  17. Had a Saturday and Sunday Arts and Crafts Festival the largest in south Ms. the festival was good but was cold for us southerners windy and cold. But Saturday I got a nice surprise delivered to me . Thanks very much for the antler. Looking to see what I can find in it to carve.
  18. The multi tool. Thanks to Iopaki I buildt a very effective waterflow system so the stone and grinding tips now it's perfect!
  19. It ok don’t worry about it , I am trying to get myself ready for the local Arts and crafts Festival and show, here in our town and it is right on the side of our building, so I set up in our side yard. Show is Saturday and Sunday, been doing it since 1990.
  20. Hi Joe, I apologize for not seeing your post, I have been preparing for a show that we set up this evening... and the house furnace needed to be replaced so 42° temps in the house did not allow for late night web time. I'll try to post about it at a quieter time. Janel
  21. Isn’t that something? Sadly the guy died at a very young 25. I don’t know what from. His work is even more spectacular than are the better known gothic miniature prayer beads. The details in Janella’s work are just stunning. He obviously made it a point to carve thin almost threadlike elements in the round to showcase his extraordinary skills. I find myself looking at his work wondering just how was he able to accomplish it technique wise. Unfortunately photos do not explain how he did it but only show that he did! Perhaps you might discuss the process and the specific techniques that are involved in creating such unbelievable delicacy of detail? In particular the techniques that you used in making the ‘Day Lilly And Snowy Tree Cricket’ piece. While members of the viewing public are only peripherally interested in such a discussion or essay, fellow artists hunger for them with a passion. What tools did you use, what carving techniques, what thought processes went on as the legs of the cricket grew so ‘dangerously’ slender and fragile? A viewer might not wonder about the negative space like that which exists beneath the cricket’s belly between the legs but a fellow carver would love to hear just how it was created (given that the legs are so delicate). Anyway, I am glad that you and others enjoyed seeing the pics. They were from an exhibit (and book) ‘Small Wonders: Gothic Boxwood Miniatures’ . It was an exhibit at the Met in Feb (22) 2017. And yes I am a pest but I would truly love to hear you speak in your own words about the process and thoughts that went into your beautiful and skillful work. Joe
  22. Thanks for sharing your time and information. If I get some antler I will have to try carving it. Your Pinterest pictures are inspirational and your site is very interesting. Thanks for sharing your time and information. Got something to think about.
  23. Depends on which part of the antler I am working. The disk at the end where it joins the skull is good for netsuke but is very hard and responds well to scrapers, the stem of the antler, all the antler really has a useless soft core (pith) which you must remove - it is so soft that you can flood it with warm water and scrape it out with a spoon, This leaves the wall of the antler which is a dream to carve, and which you can carve with standard wood-carving tools as well as scrapers - I have a pin-board of carved antler and bone items, mostly bone items, and none of them by me, but it does show what is possible. https://www.pinterest.co.uk/avenuew/carved-antler-and-bone/ The stems cannot be heat-formed and so lend themselves to tubular forms - traditionally, needle cases, salt cellars, powder horns. If you use a palmate antler - moose or fallow deer for instance, the palms are great for relief carvings - I split the palm and make carved inlays which are only about 1.5 mm thick, many medieval 'ivory' carvings are in fact antler. The palms can be heat-formed, up to a point, are flexible, up to a point, but can snap without warning if you get clumsy with them or they dry out too much. Biggest down-side is it can be difficult to colour, it resists many stains and is translucent. This translucency can make for an interesting carving experience if your eyes are tired or your lighting is wrong. Biggest upside - it accepts the very finest of detail in a way even box-wood doesn't; it is astonishing how fine you can carve it
  24. These are the tools of Ottaviano Jannella (circa 1654-1660), a master carver of boxwood microsculptures and some examples of his work. He studied under the famous Bernini. The universe is a crazy place to live in. If you don’t believe me then I suggest you take note of his name - Jannella and then think of another master carver of boxwood named Janel. P.S. Octaviano Janella’s father was named Jannello Jannella.
  25. That sounds interesting, never worked with antler, but would like to see it and then maybe try it. Tell me what you do to work with antler.
  1. Load more activity
×
×
  • Create New...