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Janel

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Everything posted by Janel

  1. Hi Bob, I am very short on knowing the vernacular for metal working tools. I can guess what a graver is, but would like to know for sure what it is and its intended use, and what do you mean "gravers with no heel", what is a heel? Do they have varying kinds of shapes, uses and attributes? I probably am using tools that would be called gravers, but until I know what words mean relative to the tool and uses I'll call them something else! (My college days were back in the late sixties and early seventies, and the art class information was filed away long ago, hidden from my current grey cell usage. Besides learning is fun!) Janel
  2. Janel

    introduction

    Welcome Ray! Nice to read your introduction! The carnelian with quartz is a nice little piece in progress, I like the glow it has. I would like to add here that Ray and I have been email friends since the earliest years that my work was on my web site, as early as '97-98 perhaps. I have enjoyed our friendship over the years, and appreciate the spirit that keeps him carving. Janel
  3. I have had a failed attempt at a sale this winter with someone from Europe. He and I did not manage to work out a convenient means of providing me with US Dollars for the sale of two pieces. He may have decided to not purchase, but I feel that my not knowing how to do it lost the sale for me. Who knows more than I do about international sales, between the US and other countries or not even involving the US but between other countries? Shipping works of art, materials that might be listed as not legal for crossing boundaries, customs documentations, etc. is another area of discussion we should address with this topic. I have communicated with a few European and former USSR carving friends about this subject who have been trying to figure this out for themselves. They each have worked out a method that works for their own situations. I am looking for good contributions here! Janel
  4. Thanks for the really good topic, Doug. From the seven or so years of my site being on line, I would have to agree with what you said in the above message. There have been few sales directly related to the site being on line. I receive many wonderful and appreciative messages via email from viewers and carvers who have found the site. Many friendships have grown from this activity as well, you included! I have posted prices on my web site since the beginning, but have decided that practice will change at my next site update. I have read in the last year the recommendation of Alyson B Stanfield (an artist career consultant) in an article for Sculptural Pursuit* magazine, to have "prices on websites to be listed separately from the image." When at shows I have an attractive little brochure. I print a very small number of copies and do not hand them out freely. When anyone wants to know the price of a piece, I will show them the brochure and point at the description and price. This prevents comparisons and sticker shock for the people who care more about that than exploring the carvings. Ms. Stanfield also does not appreciate seeing the "add to cart" button on sites that are showing works of art. There are other ways of handling the business of selling something that is one of a kind, versus volume multiple items, which I won't go into here. "If you are hesitant about taking your prices off your website, at least make them very small and have them blend in with your other text. Alternatively, have interested visitors contact you for more information or have a pricing page separate from your images." says Ms. Stanfield. I provide my email address only, that way I am not caught without the necessary information. I do not like sounding vague or unsure when the detailed records are in the house/office and I am at the studio fielding the phone call... I am able to respond to potential clients and will have a record of the questions and responses. Have a look around the internet at other artist's sites, see what they do for the work in similar genre and price ranges. How do you react to seeing prices associated with the art work? My own reaction to prices next to a piece is towards the negative, though I do not want to inconvenience potential clients too much by making the search for the prices difficult. We each will make our own decisions, for various reasons. To quote Ms. Stanfield: "Knowing what you want from your website, exhibitions, and career will help you make the right decision about posting your prices. Artists who are focused on sales may go one direction, while artists focused on artworld recognition will go another. Only you can decide what is best for you." *Sculptural Pursuit, Artful Business-Artist Pricing: When To Post Your Prices, Vol. 3 No. 3, Summer 2004:: pg 30-31 Sculptural Pursuit is a rather new magazine. I support it with advertising in it and hope to see it grow. The new winter issue has more color pages added! For more information, see: http://www.sculpturalpursuit.com I hope that this is helpful. Janel
  5. And How! Months before and weeks after, catching up with all that was left undone while carving. Happy travels! Janel
  6. Janel

    Tagua nut

    Hi Doug, The removal of the oils from the surface would be done so that the surface of the nut could be prepared to accept color. The consideration that the oils might migrate would have an affect on the coloration over time, if the oils in fact migrate. I have thought that older seeds might be more stable, but it makes sense that they might be susceptible to humidty changes, like ivory or wood. I think that seeds darken with age. Stephen Paulsen, a turner of the tiniest forms, knows about tagua and a wealth of other materials, woods and nuts. I'll give him a call, I do not have an email address for him. Non-water solvents, might they be able to prevent absorbtion and swelling of the nut material? Janel
  7. Janel

    Shows

    Don, I hope you have a great show! Have some fun, you have earned it with all of the work you have done to be ready for it. Take time to laugh with some old friends and meet new ones. Good thoughts coming your way while you are on your journey! Janel
  8. Janel

    Tagua nut

    PS Sergey, I like seeing the octopus just beginning to emerge from the carving! Each carving we do grows through so many stages, each interesting on its own. Janel
  9. Hi Robert, Nice work! I do not know much about metals or knifemaking. How did you work the metal to make it look carved? That is not quite the right way to ask, but is the design carved into the metal and how did you do that? (I guess the answer, if you are willing to share, should go in the Techniques topic. ) It is good to see your work. Janel
  10. Janel

    introduction

    Hi Mike, Your concept of the spoon, used throughout a person's life is nice. I look forward to the images you hope to send. I did find the earlier images you sent to me. Good luck figuring out the camera. The philosphical thoughts about the spoon, knife handles, functional/non functional could be fodder for discussion topic The Way. Janel
  11. Janel

    introduction

    Hi Dick, Questions about what you tried to load... were the images too large? The Adminstration recommends using a maximum of 640x480 pixel measurement, with a 50 K file size. If you used too much text for one message and/or too many images, try the tutorial method of Jim Kelso with the progression of process with the leaves... multiple entries, one step described at a time. Also, start you own topic, to keep it unique from other discussions. If you have more questions before starting your entries, please ask them. I would like to see what you have to contribute! Janel Later: I saw the posting of the Hummingbird Medal. It would be great to see that up close, in person. The delicate vein cutting for one of the wing overlays is quite something. I would love to see how it all works together, and touch it. Now, you said you ran out of space, was that on the topic page? Have you figured out what to do yet? I think I need more information from you before making another guess.
  12. Janel

    Tagua nut

    Hi Sergey, Your question, "That will if delete the butter from nut with using solvents?", is a good question to ask! What a good concept for learning more about. Do you have any suggestions about particular solvents that might be used? Which solvents will disolve vegetable oils? Non water based would be my first choice if I were to start testing. Another thought might be dish or laundry soap or detergent, since the oil is vegetable rather than mineral. There are products that are not scented that might be useful. I am concerned about soaking the nut in water and then drying; would it not increase the risks of cracking? Years ago, I did soak and dry a piece of a nut. The piece expanded from absorbing water, and left the water a little milky. That was long enough ago that I do not remember if the piece dried to a smaller dimension or if its properties had changed. I have chosen to carve the well-aged nut dry and not whole. I prefer knowing where the drying cracks are and will remove them, using only the uncracked part of the material. The carving of the dry nut is less easy, but fewer risks are taken with the investment of time in the piece. Included below is a piece from a half of a tagua nut, which had dried for years before carving: Hiding Peeper, 2002 Tagua Nut Hiding within the curled oak leaf is a tiny spring peeper. The translucent tagua nut, known also as vegetable ivory, allows light to pass through it, as does the body of a spring peeper when seen in sunlight. Dimensions: 1.25 x 1.0 x 0.6 inches 3.2 x 2.6 x 1.6 cm Janel
  13. Janel

    Aduki Leaf Pin

    Hi Jim, You "Choose" more than one file, one at a time, select the image and "Add This Attachment", one at a time. I believe that is what to do. I am awaiting the installments! Janel
  14. Janel

    Walrus Tooth

    Thanks Tom, The illustrations are great! I am familiar with Procion, and have a number of little jars of it. Long ago I chose to not use them on wood after experimenting with it. It will be interesting to see what it will do with the non wood materials. I am also familiar with vinegar or higher strength acetic acid. I noticed that you did not mention rinsing off the vinegar. Would leaving it on the surface make a color change with the dye? (like a mordant?) Lots of fun ahead! Janel
  15. Janel

    Walrus Tooth

    I am carving walrus tooth for the first time and am wondering about its ability to take on coloration. Does anyone have experience with this material? I have one more tooth and will test it with various techniques to see if is stainable. The cicada netsuke, below, is 1.5 inches and is incomplete. Janel
  16. Janel

    Aduki Leaf Pin

    Jim, This is fascinating! Thanks for the tutorial. I am not familiar with some of the terms you use, having no background in metals. I appreciate the little descriptions that accompany the words with which I am unfamiliar. I also like the use of the watermark on your images. Janel
  17. Janel

    introduction

    Dick, Thanks for describing what you have done. It is quite interesting to imagine the variety of skills you have acquired over the years. When you say "The small sculptures that I do are created from a hundred of more individual pieces that are brazed and soldered together then carved", do you make numerous pieces as you enjoy them, and then select them when composing a new piece? Janel
  18. Janel

    introduction

    Hi Michael! Welcome to The Carving Path! Nice to read your message. It sounds like you have made some tools by now. Do you have any favorites? When you describe the tools, add your contribution to the Tools & Technical topic. If you have photos of the tools, it will add to the description. What have you been carving lately? Janel
  19. Janel

    introduction

    Hello Dick, Nice to meet you. What kind of sculptures did you do for the Franklin Mint? Having done shows in Philadephia in the past, I met one or two people who worked for the FM. In my past work, I carved shallow relief on porcelain wheel-thrown lidded boxes, but not with as much realistic representation as the artists do for the FM. I see different colors and assume that there are several pieces of metal joined to create the openness and depth in the piece shown above. How does one color metal? I look forward to your contributions. Janel
  20. Janel

    Share The Wealth

    One of the reasons for creating The Carving Path is to welcome carvers from many disciplines, whose work involves small scale carving and to provide a friendly, informative and accessible place for communication and learning. The impetus came from our enjoyment of the International Netsuke Society Forum, which has been provided for the use of their membership who are netsuke collectors and netsuke carvers. The carvers enjoyed the site's forum when it came on line in November, but quickly found that the topics were not really designed for modern carving topics and found the need to remain on-topic a bit confusing. Today the INS Forum has just announced a significant addition to its forum topics, a whole area (huge) for netsuke carver's on-topic discussion! Have a look and when you have netsuke relevant information or ideas to share or ask about, please contribute there as well. Netsuke are a special part of the world of small sculptural carving! http://forums.netsuke.org/tool/mb/netsuke Janel
  21. Hi Jim, Nice tool! Is the triangular file a triangle in cross section, putting the cutting edge at the intersection of a greater angle than a knife? I also use the triangle principle when making my favorite tools. The concept behind the tool on the lower left of the image came from reading the book about bone carving by Stephen Myhre. Ten years later, I was able to acquire a couple of his tools, and I learned that my tools have evolved into something different. I like his tools, and I like mine, each having their own uses. The slanted oval face makes a good two sided scraping tool, or the end may be used as a gouge. The largest here is 1/4" in diameter, made from a Sears Craftsman pin punch. There are two qualities available, I found by chance. The more expensive one may be a higher grade of metal and hold a sharp edge longer. The smallest I use is a sewing needle, smaller than a darning needle, which is also in my tool set. The three sided tool is ground on a whet stone until the three faces are about equal. One side is dedicated to being curved, again on the whet stone, which gives the tool two larger and rounded scraping edges, and the point is great for undercutting. Well, cutting is a relative term, more scraping occurs with the hard materials I use. The tool sizes to date are from a very tiny high speed drill bit to a larger a third or 3/32" high speed drill bit (the cutting end if the drill bit is set into the handle). The in between sizes are Sears pin punches. It is possible that I annealed and hardened the larger tool for working with the hard metal. That was long ago, memory fails me... There are more tool discussions on the International Netsuke Society Forums: http://forums.netsuke.org/tool/mb/netsuke This site has just announced a significant addition to its forum topics, a whole area (huge) for netsuke carver's on-topic discussion! Have a look and when you have netsuke relevant information or ideas to share or ask about, please contribute there as well. Netsuke are a special part of the world of small sculptural carving! Janel
  22. Janel

    At the bench

    For a quick test of light and camera, I tried reflecting light off of a piece of white drawing paper onto a gray card with the carving on it. A little daylight from this snowy day leaked through the blinds, the bulb is a twist-fluorescent. I set the white balance by aiming at the gray card to the upper left of the little carving (one handed) and then shot the image. Photoshop helped to further white balance the images, both were not true colors before adjustment, and are still not. This did not result in a publishable image, but is a good note to me of the carving progress. The set up was reminiscent of the one that Jim Kelso uses. I will use a proper set up when taking final images, and use better lighting. A couple of weeks ago, Bladesmith's Forum discussed differing techniques: bouncing light off of an overhead white surface, vs direct light through diffusers. Excellent results are seen with both setups in the support images provided with the discussion. The light source and white balance, managed well, provided dynamic shading, hi-lights and color reproduction. It is fun to see what is possible, even at my level of accomplishment! Janel
  23. Janel

    Getting to know you

    This topic is very interesting reading! Thank you all for introducing yourselves. I look forward to this topic growing with more introductions. Please know that Jim Kelso has been working along with Don Fogg and Janel Jacobson to bring The Carving Path Forum to you. Janel
  24. The beveled edge appears twice now. Hmmm, I think that I will have to see if a couple of my tools would benefit my work by doing that! Would a polished high speed drill bit be a good burnisher? Tempering would be a great subject to read about. There are other parts to this subject, such as which metals to use, shapes and sources for such metal items, annealing and shaping, all things which are part of the process of tool making. Janel
  25. Janel

    How To:

    This is a subject which many of us are always seeking to learn more about. Today, I complimented Doug Sanders on his image of beads, knowing that he is becoming acquainted with a digital camera. He mentioned learning about f-stop adjustments for greater depth of field, white balance, lighting systems, background gradient from light to dark, all ripe topics for discussion! Another direction could include film/slides vs. digital images, why use one or the other, considering the end use... Jump in! Janel
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