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Hyllyn

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About Hyllyn

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    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 08/29/1980

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    elentano@msn.com
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  1. Hyllyn

    help for riusha netski

    there will be parasitic plants all over the world Dante meaning there should be orchids in Japan, however which species I do not know.
  2. Hyllyn

    help for riusha netski

    thanks for articulating that so well Ford. It's almost as if the Harrods' customer attitude should be validated everywhere. @ Velin... Thank you for the assistance
  3. Hyllyn

    help for riusha netski

    And who said that there aren't banana trees and bromeliae in Japan?
  4. Hyllyn

    help for riusha netski

    Dante. I would suggest banana leaf or bromeliae. It is the usual environment in which I used to find tree frogs in the jungle in any case and their weight would often bend the leaf around in a pleasant and elegant way... in fact my sketchbook is filled with ideas which orbit around tree frogs and banana leaves. And for what is worth and not meaning any disrespect to anyone. I am glad these discussions stay in the open. If one cannot see beyond our own noses and gracefully accept the beneficial fruit of adult discussion then it is best to wrap yourself in cotton wool and live that way... problem is, that cotton wool catches fire easily.
  5. Hyllyn

    Its looks lovely and old..

    Probably not far off Ford. The ability to trap, use fire to cook what is caught (a means of primary digestion to break down nutrients... imagine how boring it would be to have to ruminate... also not very impressive when it comes to charming people with culinary skills) and therefore allow the brain to use glucose in higher doses did go a long way to make us what we are.
  6. Hyllyn

    Its looks lovely and old..

    The polarity of the atoms of a particular element dictate that, not evolution. Elements and compounds do not evolve. It's not that on a scientific level the discussion is not worth having, it is just that so much of it as Clive has explained is already there but you have to know where to find it. I would also like to thank Clive for bringing this topic up. I have been for long pondering about the same things and a large tract of the things you have said resonate with the conclusions I have reached so far (for myself). Your points about finding the right means of expression to communicate your own relationship with nature are things that concern me but I also dread the path taken by some who claim too easily to allow the material to dictate and speak... I suppose ideally one's understanding of the material would be so, that unveiling it in a way that the material itself cooperates with ones contemplations still looks like no coercion has taken place but rather more like a mountain would look over time through its stages since it first appeared as one... it has always been a mountain, it will never be anything else regardless of how you look at it... either as a grain of sand of its eroded rock or from looking at its full vastness and diversity... In that, am afraid is where I am lost (and what I am in awe or admire or wish could find a way to mimic [to use terms already used here]. It is in a way a totally different way of creation for there nature does not create from zero but it sculpts with what is there, even if we talk down to the minutiae of atoms of elements (both organic and inorganic). I wish I could elaborate further but I lack the time right now... maybe some other time.
  7. Hyllyn

    Quiz.

    That's a shame about the deer. I had the impression from the photo that it would have a lot more workable material than other antler that can be found. I was thinking about the stabilisation of the hippo tooth. I really know little about stabilising materials but I would imagine that the tubules are still filled up with the hydroxylapatite and something else as it is often the case when the replacement process gets started (perhaps the matrix it is in has collagen or something similar). So I don't know how much use it would be but perhaps fotocuring the material might solidify it just like it happens with fillings. Just an idea of course which I don't know if it would work. About the narwhal tusk you posted. The whole in the middle is not the sole occurrence of narwhal tusk as it is merely the dental canal in a very straight dental piece... however I was reading the following http://www.interbook-artbooks.com/index.ph...ducts_id=240070 and I wondered if the appearance of himotoshi in netsuke owes its origins to the use of materials like ivory (because of the aforementioned dental canal) Thanks a lot for the info on all the materials. It's quite priceless the info you are sharing with us
  8. Hyllyn

    Quiz.

    My guess Clive having studied dentistry up to a certain point is just as it happens with humans Dentin and Cementum keep regenerating over most of our lives by means of reabsorption where possible and dentino-neogenesis. I don't need to be a vet to understand that in Hippos these teeth suffer from a lot of attrition and will develop erosion facets which need to be plugged in and repaired as the animal goes along (by means of generating more dentin and cementum to keep proper occlusion... also these teeth keep growing in hippos for as long as they live as far as I know). The strange formations might be akin to what happens in flawed human dental formation when we suffer from diseases for extended periods of time (these normally are registered in the teeth, which can be seen as boundary variations between the layers that have been deposited during growth [for more interesting images on that consult any medical or dental histology books]), it would also be expected that any softer newer material is closer to the pulp as the process originates there as a means to keep tooth height and occlusion and simply because the outer material is more calcified and differentiated and as such it lacks the physiological ability to provide odontoblasts. So perhaps that material is newer in relation to the rest of the tooth and had not gone onto harden the same way as the rest of the tooth, the ring formation (or malformation if this is rare in hippo teeth... teeth tend to like to grow in a certain order but certain areas of teeth can have that annular feature if the morphology of the tooth requires it) could have originated from diseases the animal suffered which were then recorded in such a way. Lovely materials. I particularly liked the deer antler. What is the material like if you don't mind telling?
  9. Hyllyn

    Umimatsu

    I definitely want photos via e-mail! Excellent stuff
  10. Hyllyn

    Oil Gilding Process

    Slow connection made me double post, so will use the second post to paste the find He uses the same brand of oil gold size as you use Phil and then just uses the mops to push it in as you described. http://davidhuang.org/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=5069 http://davidhuang.org/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=5072 http://davidhuang.org/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=5078 it makes me think that because he did the patina before, there must be still a layer of oxides on the inside of the vessel prior to gilding. Of course he could always clean it up before but he would be risking some damage to the patina as well and if needing to repatinate then he would risk most certainly damage to the leaf. Any ideas? That's most generous of his to post the info on his website, so now I know the two people I have to thank when I successfully finish my first.
  11. Hyllyn

    Oil Gilding Process

    I think taking that route as appealing a technique as it seems these days, would have ruined the patina he puts on the vessels. I think he has some step by step pictorials but never about the leaf gilding bit as far as I recall. I will make some time soon and mail him and see, if no one else beats me to it first (which I don't mind if someone else does).
  12. Hyllyn

    Oil Gilding Process

    Got the tools, now it's time to practice. I'm wondering though, what would you recommend if I wanted to gild metal with gold leaf?. Much like David Huang's work http://davidhuang.org/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=7915
  13. Hyllyn

    Umimatsu

    So do I because in a polished state, what I have looks like that sample you posted Doug.
  14. Hyllyn

    Umimatsu

    Excellent job Clive. I hope you don't mind me copying this into a notepad for personal reference?
  15. Hyllyn

    new work

    What would be the scientific name then of the species? if you don't mind.
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