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Jim Kelso

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Everything posted by Jim Kelso

  1. Very nice Francis. A lot going on in a small piece. 👍
  2. That's a very interesting test Francis. It may be that the low percentage of iron had little, if any effect. There are so many variables in the niage process. I applaud all efforts toward gaining depth of experience. It's interesting how the wet alloys look so much richer. It is true that lighting makes huge differences in how these colors look. I try almost always to use fresh solution, but this is costly, and my lack of experience using used solutions does not inform how long, and under what conditions, a solution remains viable.
  3. A lot to cover here Francis, but you clearly have a good grasp of the basics to ask such good questions. Experience is the key to all. You will hear various truisms, some which will bear out and some which won’t. Also something that works one time may be hard to replicate. Small things that you didn’t notice may have an effect. It’s easy to understand why the Japanese had specialists who only did patina, or it was their primary focus in a studio. I struggled with a certain piece, finally getting it acceptable without knowing quite why. I took it to Japan and consulted with a professor at Tokyo Geidai (U of Fine Arts) and he said very clearly what was going on and the light-bulb went on. I had done the right thing, finally, but without really grokking why. The point is, again, experience is the key. I would focus on smallish works, as you are, and combinations of colors, and move on with what you learn. I have found that some pieces I considered small tests turned out to hold up quite well as finished pieces. some specifics to follow....
  4. I do use them in the flexible-shaft too but not when it’s risky😉
  5. Hello Francis. Welcome! Jim
  6. Looks like splendid progress Francis. Stones can be shaped to fit the job, and are best for maintaining flatness, or blending contours. After that, before the brush/abrasive grit polish, I am using rubberized abrasive wheels that are either whole or cut to shape(hand-held, not in rotary tool). Scrapers have their place for detail, but I find do not work well for leveling. An InstaGram post: https://www.instagram.com/p/B3FTYf4HWBL/
  7. Very nicely done Francis. Elegant and stylish. The katakiri is very lovely. Beautiful movement in a deceptively simple design.
  8. Jim Kelso

    Gravers

    Found a discussion here: http://forums.dfoggknives.com/index.php?showtopic=8236&hl=demagnetizing
  9. Jim Kelso

    Gravers

    I use a commercial demagnetizer that a friend gave me from the jewelry trade. I don't know any other way but would love to. Jim
  10. Jim Kelso

    Gravers

    Hi Richard. Sorry for the slow response as I've been out of town. I'm glad you're getting some good results. I would like to clarify that my tools are, in general, hybridized, being a mix of European, American and Japanese derivation. Once you grasp the underlying principles involved it becomes a matter of the materials and methods that are most comfortable for you. Beyond the point geometry, the rest is down to preferences. Happy chiseling. Jim
  11. Thanks very much Fred. My goal in my work is to infuse it with as much of the power, beauty and mystery of nature as I can muster. I feel that the enjoyment that's poured into a work is most critical, giving it life. We are fortunate to have both ancient and more recent methods available, giving us the ability to choose whatever methods we find most suitable, to get the result we envision. Jim
  12. Thanks Brian. A few more photos to follow.
  13. Thanks very much Mike. I've added more photos to the stoning tutorial so refresh your browsers.
  14. I'm working on a new stone finish tutorial(still in progress) and have finally indexed all my tutorials on one page. Go HERE and click the "Tutorials" link. I'm happy to hear suggestions on how to improve these or ideas for new ones. Jim
  15. For Mac users there is EasyCrop. Much quicker and simpler than Photoshop and opens fast. Drag the photo in, crop out useless background, move a slider for dimension, type in your file size, drag the photo to your desktop and you're done. Jim
  16. Yes! It's a small friendly world here and we should be on a real name basis.
  17. Jim Kelso

    Gravers

    Bob, it's been brought to my attention that I failed to answer your question! Well it's only been 9 months. Sorry I missed it. Although I was shown Kano Natsuo's chisels at the National Museum in Tokyo and my own teacher Toshimasa's in Osaka, as well as others, I don't follow the Japanese chisel forming per se. My own forming is something of a hybrid which I've settled on; sometimes using Japanese blank tagane(forged and roughly shaped blanks)mostly for chasing, and sometimes from HSS rounds(as previously mentioned) or squares, mostly for engraving. The primary consideration, as you well know, is whether you can produce a functional cutting tip with the proper geometry to do the job you want. The pictures I think are from some material circulated by Hiroko and Gene Pijanowski a number of years ago. Not sure what the original source was.
  18. Jim Kelso

    Gravers

    Finally! A use for all those Champagne corks! It's worth a try. I do like the feel of the mushroom shape palm handles.
  19. Great info, thanks to both Janel & David. For Mac users I have found a great little bit of shareware($12.). If you are just cropping and sizing an image(for the forum or email for example) I prefer this software as it is very fast and less cumbersome than opening Photoshop. You simply drag a photo into the well(see attached screen-shot). Do the sizing on the right, and drag it off from the right. The feature I like most is that you can set the file size limit and also set the physical size without doing any calculations. This has been a teaching aid to me in seeing how much smaller I can get the files to still get reasonable resolution. Here's the software provider. Sorry for Mac only Yellowmug EasyCrop And here's the screenshot: EasyCropScrShot.tiff
  20. Jim Kelso

    Gravers

    I've found an online source for hardened round stock for gravers. Tool & Die .com At the home page do a search for "hardened ground round" and click that same subject when it comes up in the search results. When you open the drop down menu for sizes you'll see 3/32 and 1/8 among others. I've used M2 but probably any of the alloys will be fine. Also GRS sells graver stock in a variety of shapes. They only have rounds in carbide which I don't use as I find it tedious to sharpen and unnecessarily tough for cutting non-ferrous metals.GRS Tools.com
  21. Jim Kelso

    Gravers

    Here's a graphic of three Japanese chisels with four views of each. You have a front view of each above and then top, bottom and side of each below. The side views show the same type of sweeping heal I use.
  22. Jim Kelso

    Gravers

    Robert, that's an interesting approach using a fulcrum. Did you develop that on your own, or is it used historically too? How do you control the chisel/fulcrum if you're using a hammer to drive the chisel?
  23. Jim Kelso

    Gravers

    I got a bunch years ago that I'm still working on from Latrobe Steel of Koncor Industries. I did a search and it looks like you should call and get a local dealer who will sell a small quantity. 603-329-0101 I'm going to look at some other possibilities. I think Don will also have some ideas when he's back. The HSS drill bits are the same family although no doubt there are many different alloys. For our purposes, the most general duty type should work fine.
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