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Donn Salt

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About Donn Salt

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    http://www.donnsaltjade.com
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  1. Donn Salt

    Ama & Octopus

    AWESOME ..... Just awesome Natasha.
  2. Donn Salt

    Marsden Flower Jade

    Looking good Jason...... cool design to match the stone! The Wyoming 'Honey Olive' is a fantastic jade. And like all high quality, sought after jades is becoming scarcer and more expensive. However, was fortunate in obtaining a few pound at the last Big Sur Jade Fest. A bit darker than this one. The specimen you've carved here is of that 'best of the best' which is equal to any of NZ's top material and like you say, such a pleasure to work. No hidden surprises! For me, when carving it, it feels 'older' and more mature than NZ jade and is a supreme gift of Mother Earth. I was told recently this is supposed to be the oldest jade on the planet. How one determines that beats me although am quite prepared to believe it after carving a cuppla pieces. Cheers..... Donn
  3. Donn Salt

    file & burr sharpening

    Phosphoric acid is a curious one ...... Another spot of interest from one of those ancient workshop books was a passage referring to phosphoric used in solution to soften bone !!! Which it does...... Subsequently, years later, I used to buy it in bulk as a rust treatment for a steel boat ....... it defiantly kills rust..... converts to a black coating of iron phosphate. The stuff was in a liquid concentrate form and was strong enough to cause instant fizzzing on high carbon metals ie files ..... eating into the metal, hence the 'sharpening' so caution is needed. As potential interest below is from Wikipedia Rust removal Phosphoric acid may be used by direct application to rusted iron, steel tools, or surfaces to convert iron(III) oxide (rust) to a water-soluble phosphate compound. It is usually available as a greenish liquid, suitable for dipping (acid bath), but is more generally used as a component in a gel, commonly called naval jelly. It is sometimes sold under other names, such as "rust remover" or "rust killer." As a thick gel, it may be applied to sloping, vertical, or even overhead surfaces. After treatment, the reddish-brown iron oxide will be converted to a black iron phosphate compound coating that may be scrubbed off. Multiple applications of phosphoric acid may be required to remove all rust. The resultant black compound can provide further corrosion resistance (such protection is somewhat provided by the superficially similar Parkerizing and blued electrochemical conversion coating processes). Following application and removal of rust using phosphoric acid compounds, the metal should be oiled (if to be used bare, as in a tool) or appropriately painted, by using a multiple coat process of primer, intermediate, and finish coats. Care must be taken to avoid acid burns of the skin and especially the eyes, but the residue is easily diluted with water. When sufficiently diluted, it can even be nutritious to plant life, containing the essential nutrients phosphorus and iron.
  4. Donn Salt

    file & burr sharpening

    For what this may be worth. One trick to revive dulled files & burrs, which I discovered in an old jewellers / watchmakers book of my father's and which I've had some positive results with, is to immerse the said tools in phosphoric acid. De-greased of course. Experiments differed with concentrations and length of immersion. Surprisingly efficient on 'dead' needle and hand files off the jewellery bench. Donn
  5. Donn Salt

    Marsden Flower Jade

    Hi Lauri, Thank you for your so kind words. They are very much appreciated. Here is an extract to a friend who recently queried something of the likes about a mutual compatriot....... "Yep, see the influence in the work... All cool and to be expected as the plays with evolving skills illustrate. One trusts their own design senses will mature with time and experience. We all learn from that which has gone before us..... 'tis the nature of learning. Fascinating and encouraging to follow the growth." We all learn from works which have preceded us where emulation is a natural and accepted evolvement. It is when these originals are copied, mass produced and enter the commercial realms, motivated by self serving profits, with no recognition or return to the originators that plagiarism runs riot. Alas, all too common in todays world. Much activity with pencil to paper is crucial in developing ideas and design..... even redrawing and expanding on existing works without necessarily remaking them will be of immense benefit. This is where line and balance will become second nature. Highly encouraged is a study and understanding of the Golden Mean which will also greatly assist in successful imagery and design. Have fun Lauri, the possibilities are endless ....... limited only by the imagination! Cheers .... Donn
  6. Donn Salt

    Marsden Flower Jade

    Hey Guys .... Have been meaning to enter this for some time..... Here is the proposed Nga Tahu management plan for NZ nephrite jade Although this was implemented over 12 years ago I am informed by aspiring young carvers there is still no significant jade available to further the art of contemporary jade-carving in N.Z. There is still the occasional indigenous jade able to be obtained from old collections and estates as and when becomes available. Sometimes seen on www.TradeMe.co.nz as Billy mentions. Should one be so fortunate as to possess such anyone is able to legally export up to 10lb of raw jade at a time without infringing on present legislation. This limit was introduced immediately post WWII as a protection for the rehab. of returned soldiers. Prior to this most of the jade recovered was shipped off to Ida Oberstien in Germany. Much of to be mutilated into mindless souvenir trinkets and atrocious representations of 'tiki'. Not allot different today with much of the commercial jade souvenir items being carved out of the country from foreign jade with original designs plagiarized and cheapened beyond the scope of the originators to compete with. However one must recognize that nephrite is a gift of the Earth and occurs in multitude locations all over the world. Often equal to and sometimes superior to any of our best NZ jades. The energies of the material are still that of the planet wherever it may be found. As history informs us all cultures who used jade held the stone in the highest esteem. Of recent times I have personally researched and been fortunate in securing numerous specimens of jade, both nephrite and jadeite, from many sources around the globe. Often, the qualities of which have blown me away..... !!!! Not to mention rare colors which are not found here in NZ. Particularly the Whites, olives and blues. This pendant is a rare, blue tinged, Wyoming nephrite. Carved as an experiment with this gifted specimen when in the US last month. A particularly beautiful stone which was a pleasure to work and unfortunately the only example passed into my hands. Of a similar color and even more rewarding to carve is a little known Yukon nephrite, which is equal to any jade I've had the honor of applying tool to. NZ or exotic. The Yukon block ..... and pendant from it below.... A smooth, creamy feeling to this subtle Yukon Blue when carving. Wandered off theme somewhat..... started with the pebble below. This palm sized pebble of Marsden 'Flower Jade' is almost identical to a sample found in Northern California. The difference was literally impossible to discern. Remarkable maybe, although to be expected as the serpentine structures along the US western coast line are not dissimilar to the geological structures of New Zealand and other examples from northern California confirmed there are very similar occurrences which are very close in appearance and color to NZ jade.
  7. Donn Salt

    The gender of carving materials

    And JADE From the depths of Gaia... 'Gift of the Gods' .... 'The Stone of Heaven' .... Portal to 'All There Is' Genderless
  8. Donn Salt

    Latest Jades

    Not difficult to find Billy ..... Am in the White Pages ..... Just give plenty of warning
  9. Donn Salt

    Latest Jades

    Heya Billy, Thanks. The small studio / workshop abode is nestled in the bush on the Tutukaka Coast half an hour out of Whangarei, NZ.
  10. Donn Salt

    Latest Jades

    As a matter of interest perhaps is this Dragon carved way back about 1978 when 1st experimenting making silver steel tools and whale ivory did not carry the stigma it has today. An 6 inch sperm whale tooth cut in half length ways and set into a fitting recess carved into the jade pebble.
  11. Donn Salt

    Latest Jades

    Hey Natasha! Many thanks for your wonderful words. Patience and innovation are the essential aspects of working these exotic materials. Ivory or Jade ..... As your own extreme patience and skill is so well illustrated in the absolutely incredible pieces you honor us by sharing...... very humbling They just blow me away! Hi Phil, Those comments are greatly appreciated, thank you. And I will add here the tutorials you post up on the forum are fantastic. Especially the gold leaf sequence. Better than many so called instructional publications that have passed thru my hands over the years, not to mention the tool steel sequence which would be prime knowledge for every carver to assimilate. I know when you take the time to bite the bullet and apply tool to jade your own extensive experience will serve you more than well. Again ... thanks....... Donn
  12. Donn Salt

    Latest Jades

    Hiya Jim, Your words, so much appreciated. Thank you Hey Debbie, Innovation in adapting existing tools and systems to a desired end other than the original purpose is the key. Sufficient air flow for a fitting such as illustrated on the hand-piece above is not allot. Although not explored, suspicions are the exhaust of an old vacuum cleaner would be more than adequate. Requires no more than 20 to 25 psi. down to 5 to 10 psi., adjusted to specific requirements. The air brush thoughts are intriguing ....... keep us posted. Yo Tom, Yeah, this Dragon stone is truly 'A Gift of the Gods' 'The Stone of Heaven'. Used for special pieces only. Best comparison for you is it's not dissimilar to some of the better Wyoming 'Honey Olive' of which you are familiar. Awesome stone! Meaning structure and translucence.... colors are quite different. Recognitions ? Thanks ....... Donn
  13. Donn Salt

    Latest Jades

    High Debbie, Thanks for the kind words. Your own work illustrates a considerable degree of talent and promises to be exceptional as experience is gained. Being unfamiliar with your working environment, tools and jade it is difficult to determine the cause of the crazing you mention which leaves me a little perplexed. Both jadeite and nephrite are reasonably heat resistant, from a carving perspective, and any crazing as you mention must be from quite hard pressure with dry tools .... even so it is still unfamiliar to me. When Matt Glasby and I discussed working dry he informed me he works quite allot with a dry burr toward finishing the diamond tooling stages. Light pressure and gentle, quick brushed strokes. From experience too much pressure will strip an electro-plated diamond burr of it's diamond coating before doing too much damage to the stone itself, wet or dry.... especially dry! Jade has a vast difference of qualities from the next to useless soft, grainy material to the super clean and tight. No two stones alike and often stark contrasts within the same stone. All affecting working properties. Your comment on not being able to see the stone through a slurry of liquid is right. Especially if one is carving in a dish of water as I did for a number of years when first starting out. Even under a drip feed the problem is still not much different. Managed to solve this problem by making a combined water / air attachment for the hand-piece. The air and water are independently adjustable as per the specific requirements for working. No magic applied to finishing except patience. All done is with bonded silicon carbide in one form or another. Cut up old grind wheels, green grit sharpening stones from the local hardware store or 2nd hand tools shop. Personal opinion only is diamond pastes and loose grit just do not do the trick satisfactorily, tending to undercut on the softer grain. Trust this helps.... Donn
  14. Donn Salt

    Latest Jades

    Hey Magnus, Thank you also, for the encouraging remarks. The 'pair' of darker blue lilies is a tone which shows the form much better than the paler, more translucent example above and works well with the satin texture. The greater reflected light from this surface shows form much better than a gloss all over. Cheers
  15. Donn Salt

    Latest Jades

    Hey Dante, You be right ! The Guatemalan jadeites are a new material which I've hardly had a chance to explore and the blues are a major interest. Either nephrite or jadeite. The small amount of raw Guatemalan I have here will keep until the Jade Cove event. Design inspirations are all around us ...... It's a 24/7 consciousness, mostly sub-conscious, which triggers the stimulation. Looking at your work clearly illustrates this. Tendrils are all through nature.... plant and marine ..... !!!! Wonderful design aspects to play with. Will talk more on stone and workings of with you at Big Sur. Janel, As always your encouraging words touch to the soul...... Thank you.
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