Jump to content

Carved Steel


tsterling

Recommended Posts

Here are a couple of examples of the direction I'm trying to go these days: carved metal. It turns out that steel is as smooth to carve as boxwood, although a little harder (in both meanings of the word...). Of course, the really neat part is you can whack on the metal and get it shape without cutting something off, unlike boxwood.

 

post-11-1181688390.jpg

Snakewood and fossil ivory dagger, in kapped stone tool style, 2 1/4 inch 1080 carbon steel blade, 5 1/8 inches overall length. The only real carving here is the steel blade...

 

post-11-1181688735.jpg

Using some of the techniques so aptly demonstrated by Jim Kelso and Ford Hallam (thanks, guys!), this is my second attempt at a "figurative" style of carving in steel (mild steel). The beetle is about an inch in length. Don't laugh too hard - these are new skills I'm having to come up with - thanks to the metal bashers on the forum!

 

Eventually, I hope to add carved steel/metals to my knives, hence the question in the metalwork forum about kozuka. There is a steep learning curve...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the kind words, guys! As to the beetle, Karl, I assure you it is tick-less. Any resemblance to a tick is purely coincidental, although the humorous attempt to tick me off really tickles me, and I'm certain you could tick off the differences between beetles and ticks like clockwork, tick, tock!! :blink: However, I did use little tick marks in the carving process...well, must run, time is ticking away!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest ford hallam

Hi Tom,

 

Like I said over on the blade-smiths forum, I think this way of working steel makes for a very attractive knife. I'm actually even thinking of giving it a go myself. Any chance of a tutorial? :huh: please.

 

I'm also chuffed to see that you too are being led down the metal carving path, he he, soon everyone will be converted. :blink:

 

If I may, I have one small suggestion I would make which may add a little to your carved beetle. I see you've used a stippled texture, quite appropriately, to provide a contrast to the relief carving and as a way of finishing the background and all those hard to get at nooks and crannies. I would just suggest that while the texture is perfectly suited for this purpose the way it follows basically just the area that was actually carved leaves it looking, to my eyes, unfinished. I think that perhaps an oval or rectangular area that is clearly defined would give the carving a more "finished " appearance. Perhaps even an "emerald" shape, ie, a rectangle with the corners chopped off, might compliment the shape and structure of the beetle.

 

I hope you don't mind me offering this comment, it may after all, be helpful to others starting out on this road too.

 

cheers, Ford

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Ford - You've become sort of a weapon of mass distraction here lately, running around giving everybody this metalworking bug! Something of a virus... :blink:

 

I'll make a tutorial next time I get to making one of these blades - it's really quite simple, as long as you understand what it is you're trying to imitate. I'll try to remember to include some images of real stone points to alleviate that. Most of the other blades of this genre I've seen suffer from not knowing what a real stone point looks like.

 

post-11-1181767208.jpg

As to the stippled/punched ares, something like this?

 

Karl, I like the big beetles, but am at a loss so far how to do a rhinocerous beetle - the head/horns parts seem so 3D, and steel carving seems to be such very shallow relief. A three-quarter view, maybe? Any ideas as to how to do that convincingly? I can see how a nice stag beetle would work well, though. I generally like to keep handles on knife-shaped objects reasonably compact, without big carbuncles on them like a really 3 dimensioned beetle would be...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Aloha Tom,

 

Two thoughts.

1) How about two Rhinos pincer to pincer, interlocked in a battle over a female. Their heads could be turned to the side in reverse to each other to keep a lower profile. That would allow an over/under opportunity to create a 3D effect (and add eyes). Does that make sense?

2) This one is a little stealthier. I was hoping to get you to consider trying uchi-dashi as done in Jim's frog tutorial. It is a higher relief, and I understand the need for correct feel "in hand" for a knife, but that technique can take you into new possibilities. The input is minimal; pitch, copper (or), punches, time. It can become addictive.

I think the beetles would work well in a "primitive" theme. I meant to suggest the stag in my earlier post instead of naming the Rhino twice. I'm getting my Lucanidae and Scarabaeidae mixed up. (I'm gonna get yelled at. :blink: )

Good luck. :huh:

 

KC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tom

I particularly like the beetle with the oval "framed" stippled area. It seems like that shape would work very well against the angular shape of a blade.

 

With all this metal carving work being demonstrated i'm itching to give it a try. Just what i need, another medium to try and figure out!

 

Thanks for showing

Link to comment
Share on other sites

T for Tick? This is never going to stop, is it?

 

Uchi-dashi, Karl? :) Geez, I'm just trying to survive this particular baby step, and now you want me to head off in another direction? More tools to make, other skills to work on...I'm going back to wood before this gets completely out of hand...

 

See what happens, Andrew? Maybe you should reconsider, 'cause this bunch has no mercy... :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest katfen

Hi Tom,

 

What you're doing is pretty cool :) ....makes me really want to go and try myself. This is looking pretty good. I'd say you've caught the metal 'bug'.... :D This has a good feel to it, keep going, you're doing beautifully to start and I've enjoyed seeing and reading what you are doing in metal now. I also like the way you did the blade...certainly it has a feeling of a knapped stone. This is neat.

 

Ford, you better watch it, looks like you've got a load of competition about to arise!! :D

 

Looking forward to seeing more Tom :lol: ,

 

Kathleen

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
Nice one, Mike. On first viewing it, I thought it was a nicely pressure-flaked piece of obsidian! never thought about wood stove paint for coloring. How does it hold up to wear?

On regular knives, I sand all of it off. It's about the same as sanding off the normal heat discoloration if you use the heat treat foil. I can tell you it's very "attached" to the metal. Since this was a comission and I knew it was just going to sit on a shelf, I wasn't too worried about it. But it doesn't come off all that easily!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...