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Greetings from New Mexico


Pat Pruitt

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Hello to everyone here on the board!!! The name is Pat Pruitt, I am a metalsmith out here in the high desert of New Mexico. I work exclusively out of stainless steel (Type 316L) making personal objects of adornment. My professional career is making jewelry for the body piercing industry and that has been good to me over the years. I am a trained silversmith of southwest techniques, but have chosen a new path with jewelry and the material I love to work with.

 

I am greatly humbled to be in the presence of such talented individuals that are on this board. I have much respect for the traditional ways of doing inlay and metal working, but life has given me the opportunity to take these techniques and apply them with *modern* equipment. I have been self taught in the styles of sen-zogan and hira-zogan on stainless steel thru much trial and error over the past two years. Here are some examples of my work. You can find other examples on my site.

 

Lark_Sub.jpg

 

Flame-Bracelet-No-2.jpg

 

All the *carving* for the inlay is accomplished via 3 axis cnc. Under cuts done by hand, fine silver is the inlay material. I do work with some gold and copper as inlay material as well.

 

Im very eager to learn more hands on techniques, tool making, and also to share with you any tips or techniques I can. Once again, I am very happy to find this forum and spend more time here with you all.

 

Best Regards,

P@

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Hi Pat,

 

Welcome to The Carving Path forum! I think that we have not had an artist here who uses a CNC machine to do the carving, so it could be interesting information to read about how your technique works (of course, in the Techniques section). I seem to have some questions already for you to answer there: Do you hand carve the original model? Is the carving machine totally automatic and used for replication in multiples? More questions, I am sure.

 

Our members here present a range of tool use, from strictly no machinery to what ever works to accomplish the goal with carving. Ask questions and see what good and friendly information you might receive from our members.

 

Janel

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Hallo Pat,

 

nice that you found this forum. :rolleyes:

Your work is very particular - stainless steel is an interesting material.

I am looking forward for you posts.

 

best regards

Karl

 

Ps. Are you familiar with Carl Dau? He is a german Berlin based metalsmith making use of machine equipment and stainless steel.

Carl Dau

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Thanks for the welcomes so far!

 

Welcome to The Carving Path forum! I think that we have not had an artist here who uses a CNC machine to do the carving, so it could be interesting information to read about how your technique works (of course, in the Techniques section).

But of course, once I get a bit further along with the techniques, ill be sure to post some how to's. I guess the down side to what I do is the equipment cost, CNC gear isnt cheap, nor are the tools, but smaller home units are becoming more affordable all the time.

 

I seem to have some questions already for you to answer there: Do you hand carve the original model? Is the carving machine totally automatic and used for replication in multiples? More questions, I am sure.

I do not hand carve the orgional, (technically its machined) everything is based upon a sketch, and for doing inlay work the way I do I work in the 2-D realm. Creating shapes and designs that I can machine into the stainless (creating the cavity), then work the rest by hand with some carbide tools I built for this purpose. Unlike other techniques, i rely solely on the undercut to hold the inlay into place. To answer the question of repeating the work, it is an *automated* process, but most of my work is one of a kind, so its my artist ethic to keep things unique and truly one-off.

 

Texturing, like the rings above, are chisled in, then bright cut with a diamond file, to give it more depth an oxidation is applied before the bright cut.

 

nice that you found this forum. :rolleyes:

Your work is very particular - stainless steel is an interesting material.

I am looking forward for you posts.

Thanks, ive been working with stainless for over 13 years now, it just seemed the logical choice. I am really excited to find this forum. FINALLY some other people that are doing similar things, its such a pleasure to see.

 

Ps. Are you familiar with Carl Dau? He is a german Berlin based metalsmith making use of machine equipment and stainless steel.

Carl Dau

*bookmarked* WOW, his work is elegantly simple and refined, defiantley an inspiration.

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Aloha Pat,

 

Welcome. I am woefully behind on my greetings, but the images of your work (love them) compel me to comment. So many questions!

I used to run an instrument shop for a research lab years ago. CNC was just getting to our level. There was a disgruntled air and resistance among the old timers to this new fangled gear. Their take was that for one-of-a-kind work, why bother fiddling with programs when you can just grab the Sheldon or Bridgeport and do it? Your take; maybe not here, but in the Way, Techniques or...?

You know what is coming. :rolleyes: 18-8's. 304 versus 316. Hope to discuss it over in Metalwork.

There was an artist/jeweler that I met at the ACC show in San Francisco/Fort Mason years ago. He specialized in SS. You or someone you know?

 

KC

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Guest ford hallam

Hi there Pat,

 

Glad you could join us. I hope you'll find the wide range of approaches and materials experience here to be inspiring and helpful. :) I for one look forward to learning more of your approach to creating and the potential that your exciting technology offers.

and you're another metal basher too :D , we're taking over ;)

 

Namaste, Ford

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Once again thanks for the welcomes!

 

Their take was that for one-of-a-kind work, why bother fiddling with programs when you can just grab the Sheldon or Bridgeport and do it? Your take; maybe not here, but in the Way, Techniques or...?

You know what is coming. ;) 18-8's. 304 versus 316. Hope to discuss it over in Metalwork.

There was an artist/jeweler that I met at the ACC show in San Francisco/Fort Mason years ago. He specialized in SS. You or someone you know?

 

Aloha! Sometimes I feel the same way, the manual machines do have their purpose and I utilize them if its more advantageous to stick a slab in the bridgport than it is to setup and generat code. On the flip side, the CNC can cut super intricate designs that would be impossible on a manuall machine. Ive never done a show in SF, so you might be talking about abrasha. This is a man i do want to meet one day, probably one of the first goldsmiths to take SS into the fine jewelry realm. As for stainless discussions, if you guys ever need info, ill do my best to chime in with my experience.

 

Nice work! Be careful though. Once you become exposed to all of the different materials and techniques on this forum you may find yourself straying, andd begin to question your commitment to just one material.

 

AHAHA, ya never know, but I will always work in stainless, call it my stupidity, stubbornness, or just for the simple fact that i love the material. Its quite difficult to work with, but that is what makes it intriguing. Albeit, I have worked in titanium before, that is a love/hate relationship right there. The next step would be tantalum.

 

Glad you could join us. I hope you'll find the wide range of approaches and materials experience here to be inspiring and helpful. :) I for one look forward to learning more of your approach to creating and the potential that your exciting technology offers.

and you're another metal basher too :D , we're taking over :D

 

Metal bashers UNITE!! :) Yes, this site has already given me loads of ideas, and some I can share.

 

when you enjoy this german stuff brouse this site. NIESSING

 

Yes, Niessing i am very familiar with, they produce nice jewelry for the mass market, kinda the nemessis of us custom metalsmiths when trying to move SS work into the fine realm.

 

PS: am I the only one that uses the quote function? ;)

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Quote function, no, many use it. The way you are using it is useful. When someone just hits REPLY and reproduces the whole previous post, with images, that is redundant and cumbersome. Excerpts work. When doing a MORE OPTIONS FASTREPLY, there is also a quote function that puts a highlighted area in quotes. Enough board function talk.

 

Karl, how long ago were you at the SF ACC show? I was there 17 years ago, just before motherhood knocked on my door. I think that I did not return or do ACC shows after that.

 

Pat, I know Abrasha, have known him for years. Show friendships can take place over many years, though I don't know him well. I've always admired his work and dedication. It is interesting to hear about him here! Thanks for mentioning him.

 

(I did not use the quote function ;) )

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Aloha Pat,

am I the only one that uses the quote function?

....so you might be talking about abrasha.

The next step would be tantalum.

 

;):D:) Funny. Good one.

 

Yep, that was him. You guys amaze me.

 

Have you read Uncle Tungsten by Oliver Sacks? A most amazing autobiographical story about growing up around metals, alloys, an age of discovery and the quirky pioneers that used them. Amazon's highest ratings. Not at all boring or technical, I highly recommend it to everyone, especially metal bashers.

 

KC

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Hello Pat,

Just a note to say welcome and that I like your work. I've worked with stainless steel only in practical ways such as making prototypes for jigs and tools for an orthopedic surgeon friend of mine. I like to see fine jewelry pushing out the old boundaries even more - way to go! I started my carving in New Mexico back in 1972 working for Felco in Rio Rancho. They had a jade department back then. Apprenticed for a goldsmith named Clarence Hauquitz for 5 years in Albuquerque before moving up to the Pacific Northwest in 1978. I still have friends in N.M. and LOVE the mountains - Pecos, Jemez, Gila etc. I look forward to seeing more of your work.

Blessings,

Magnus

P.S.

By the way, I used to go into Rio Grande Jewelers when they were a dinky little shop on S.E. Edith Street - Saul ran the place back then and it was just a typical small town supply shop.

P.P.S

Hey, I just checked out your site - (nice site) - I am pleased to see you are from so much Native background

I am familar with Laguna Pueblo somewhat ( I was at least 35 - 40 years ago) It is really cool to see the forging of cultures in art. :(

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