Jump to content

Tsuba Teaser


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 56
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Hi Patrick,

This is nice - I want to see more. The background texture is very effective - is this all punched in by hand with hammer and punch? The smooth flowing ground at the bottom is also really cool - how is that achieved? ( please forgive my questions concerning what may be obvious or "difficult to explain easily" techniques.) Are the cat tail and the rocks inlaid?

Thanks,

Magnus

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Magnus,

Love the wax bead BTW.

I can't show more yet, but I can address some queastions. The texture was done in several passes. The ground was entirely texured by pouring copper plated Steel BBs onto the surface. About 40 minutes of that and the surface takes on a nice fine even texture. The rim was raised after this treatment. Then punch and hammer were used to create a courser more directional texture on top of the previous. A point was used to texture in around the inlays. Then finally a polished rather flat punch was used to blend the three textures selectivly. The smooth polished area is countoured with chisels then refined with a punch. The polishing is done with stones, sand paper, and powdered abrasives applied with a polishing brush. The cattail, Rocks, dew drops, and other dots are all inlaid.

I am traveling to a wedding this weekend. I don't know if I will get any access to the net after tonight until next week.

Patrick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

post-40-1185132418.jpg

 

post-40-1185132851.jpg

Ok here is the Front view of the Tsuba and a detail of the dragonfly. I was hoping to get some better pictures, but the best I can do is multiple images with variety of lighting angles to help give the viewer a better impression. The polished water proves very difficult to communicate with the camera. The different lighting angles and diffusion all give the water a very different appearance. :D

You can see the other shots HERE.

The piece contains many of the techniques that have been discussed in the metal working forum. Multiple Japanese alloys, Raised carved inlay, Flush wire inlays, Dot Inlay, Texturing, Classical Polishing with stones and charcoal. Also the novice version of Raised wire inlay or at least the approximation of raised wire inlay. I used strip and inlayed it deeply, which is not quite the same thing as true raised wire inlay which is very delicate and sits virtually on the surface. That takes years of practice to make it durable and I am still working on it with little success. :D

The Polishing technique combined with the Roshuko will reveal all the character in the metal. This can be scary as the crystal grains may not be of a pattern and size that is complimentary to the piece. Thankfully the grain of this piece is fairly fine. It would have been detracting if the water revealed a patch of 6mm crystals which are not uncommon in commercial copper stock. This was commercial copper, but I remelted and cast an ingot in a fast cooling steel ingot mold which really helps keep the grain fine and even. :)

Regards,

Patrick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very very nice. I like it very much and I must say this is my favorite piece of your works. If I can say one thing. Water is for me to strong, It is very well carved but too deep and it focus your attention very strong and drag attention from rest details, but it could be because of photos.

I have one question, how durable is your rokusho patina on copper, because mine is very delicate, few stronger touches with some rug and it begins to were out.

Here in Poland we have very fine copper, our copper mines are superb quality and I must say that I love to work in my copper and it is as good as old one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very very nice. I like it very much and I must say this is my favorite piece of your works. If I can say one thing. Water is for me to strong, It is very well carved but too deep and it focus your attention very strong and drag attention from rest details, but it could be because of photos.

I have one question, how durable is your rokusho patina on copper, because mine is very delicate, few stronger touches with some rug and it begins to were out.

Here in Poland we have very fine copper, our copper mines are superb quality and I must say that I love to work in my copper and it is as good as old one.

 

Thank you Bartosz,

The water is really very shallow and more subtle in person. The Lighting seemed to either hide it completely or make it seem more exaggerated than it is.

In regards to durability. Let me say a few words about this as I have thought about this often since I started making fittings full time 8 years ago. This is not just in responce to your queastion, but to whomever might be curious about the topic of patina durability as it relates to swords. :D

What I have learned is that any sword fitting put into active service will receive wear to the patina. Iron, Shakudo, and all copper alloys. These Patina all wear through rapidly where ever there is regular contact. This is just the way it is. I used to worry about this as none of them seem durable enough for training. I now have accepted that wear is simply a part of how it worked. The antiques we encounter that have intact original patina were likely never used or only worn occasionally. Anything that is used as a martial training tool is vulnerable to considerable wear and none of the authentic finishes will stand up to that for long. Rust patina on iron is the best initially , but it still wears over time and is slow to self repair. This wear is disguised in antiques for the most part because of the extreme age. The infrequent handling and storage help regenerate patina. Often completely converting the original patina to one of aged rust in the case of iron. All of these metals have a natural tendency to form a patina. Copper will self repair as it wears, but the color will not be the same as the Roshuko treatment creates. It is the same for most of the Japanese alloys. The original patina maybe partially or entirely worn off and a more natural patina reforms over time. It is not generally the same shade as the original patina. This is one reason why Shakudo was such a logical choice as it can self repair to a color that is close to the original. The environment, chemistry of the persons touching it, and the alloy content will affect how rapidly the color reforms. It can redarken in as little as a week in the case of Shakudo. This makes it very practical for service weapons that need to look nice with practically no maintenance. Training tools are the worst though. The amount of wear these see is extreme. I get allot of feed back on the durability of finishes by people that train. Frankly nothing holds up. Modern baked epoxy finishes, powder coating, and "VPD" Carbide plating all wear though eventually. The classical methods are much less durable so wear of these finishes must have been a natural and accepted part of owning and using a sword in Old Japan. I try to stress this to today's martial artists. If they can't handle the localized wear points in the finish then they need to be looking at alternative metals with no obvious patina. Solid silver, stainless steel, titanium, thick gold application or even solid gold/alloy.

Since handles degrade rapidly in use, many of the fittings are and were regularly dismounted and thus available for refinishing. So if parts with fancy patina were worn allot I have no doubt that they would have been sent off to be freshened up as a way of having your cake and eating it too. I have a standing offer to refinish my clients fittings. When ever they are dismounted they can send them back to me and I will touch them up and repatinate them as needed. Another method would have been to have two or more koshirae. One you kept in pristine condition for special events or just public carry. then one for more practical use where the finish wear was not as important such as training or war. Ok I must go back to work now before I keep rambling on and on :D

Regards,

patrick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You right Patrick, And I tell people the same thing, that if they use sword every day they can't expect that it will last forever. All things not made form metal after some time must be replace. Saya tsuka, ito. Those things in old days were like tires and suspension in our cars. They must be check sometime and change if necessary. And the same thing about patina on fittings. It has right to come out and when buying expensive fittings you must simply care about it as well as for blade and do not use it very often. Many people doesn't realize that when you buying a sword you must be prepare for cost. Sword isn't something that you buy and have forever without any additional costs. Swords are objects that need money for maintain them.

When talking about self repairing, I love my shibuishi. When I'm working with it only because of my touch it gets gray. and it gets completely gray after about 3 days. You can see how it change. I go to sleep and other day I see difference.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You right Patrick, And I tell people the same thing, that if they use sword every day they can't expect that it will last forever. All things not made form metal after some time must be replace. Saya tsuka, ito. Those things in old days were like tires and suspension in our cars. They must be check sometime and change if necessary. And the same thing about patina on fittings. It has right to come out and when buying expensive fittings you must simply care about it as well as for blade and do not use it very often. Many people doesn't realize that when you buying a sword you must be prepare for cost. Sword isn't something that you buy and have forever without any additional costs. Swords are objects that need money for maintain them.

When talking about self repairing, I love my shibuishi. When I'm working with it only because of my touch it gets gray. and it gets completely gray after about 3 days. You can see how it change. I go to sleep and other day I see difference.

I have found a product that is available from some knife suppliers. It is called RUSTFREE. It only takes a drop or two per side of blade to protect it completely. It is a silicone based liquid and totally non-oily. It keeps all my carbon steel blades from tarnishing and or darkening and I use it on my customs, with absolutely no adverse effects.

BTW, I have no affiliation with the company,whatsoever. I just really like the product.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Patrick,

 

Beautiful work!

 

Speaking as a sculptor, my favorite part is the water, and the change from the apparently flawlessly smooth surface texture to the lightly stippled background, and to the textured rocks. This is the type of transition in any piece that could have gone either way without a careful balance, and you have achieved a very beautiful effect. Very nicely done!

 

Phil

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Phil,

The texturing on this piece was an endless task :D . I was a little concerned about those transitions as I worked, but they turned out ok. Thanks for the positive remark there. The last thing I did was to come back with a very sharp point and selectively stipple around the edges of inlays. This Texture holds the Sumi more effectively than the small blunt tools used for the other texture layers. It provided a nice shadowing effect under the main rock and Seal. The water transitions were interesting. I textured into the water and polished back the texture. It gave a really subtle gradient. Then very sparsely I came back down into the transition with some more definite marks.

My client just let me do what I wanted how I wanted and I had fun :D

regards,

Patrick

 

Hi Patrick,

 

Beautiful work!

 

Speaking as a sculptor, my favorite part is the water, and the change from the apparently flawlessly smooth surface texture to the lightly stippled background, and to the textured rocks. This is the type of transition in any piece that could have gone either way without a careful balance, and you have achieved a very beautiful effect. Very nicely done!

 

Phil

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have found a product that is available from some knife suppliers. It is called RUSTFREE. It only takes a drop or two per side of blade to protect it completely. It is a silicone based liquid and totally non-oily. It keeps all my carbon steel blades from tarnishing and or darkening and I use it on my customs, with absolutely no adverse effects.

BTW, I have no affiliation with the company,whatsoever. I just really like the product.

 

 

Hi Mike,

Does this product just prevent rust or does it provide abrasion resistance as well? The Problem with Patina on fittings is one of constant wear by the rubbing of sweaty fingers and fabrics. When they do wear you want them to be able to interact with the atmosphere so they can recolor.

regards,

Patrick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Aloha Patrick,

 

Not to cast a shadow on Mike's recommendation, but speaking from a cabinetmaker/finisher's point of view, be careful with silicone based products. Furniture products with silicone act as a contaminant and can cause "fish-eye" craters when refinishing work with hard shell finishes. Removal often requires hard scrubbing with strong solvents. I forbid clients from using silicone bearing polishes, or they are on their own.

Think about a car, after detailing with a product like Armour-All. It takes weeks for that slippery feeling to wear off your hands and the steering wheel. Just a word of caution.

 

KC

 

btw - The tsuba is very well done. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Aloha Patrick,

 

Not to cast a shadow on Mike's recommendation, but speaking from a cabinetmaker/finisher's point of view, be careful with silicone based products. Furniture products with silicone act as a contaminant and can cause "fish-eye" craters when refinishing work with hard shell finishes. Removal often requires hard scrubbing with strong solvents. I forbid clients from using silicone bearing polishes, or they are on their own.

Think about a car, after detailing with a product like Armour-All. It takes weeks for that slippery feeling to wear off your hands and the steering wheel. Just a word of caution.

 

KC

 

btw - The tsuba is very well done. :D

 

I don't think it will do anything much for protecting patina on fittings in the context I am thinking of, but I appreciate the suggestions and warnings from everyone. I am thinking of using it on a Black oxide finished Firearm I own. It has composites instead of wood for the grips, and the finish rusts easily on the steel unless you keep it sopping with oil.

Regards,

patrick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Patrick,

 

This really is a beautiful work. I second Phil's comments on this one. I appreciate the various photos you took - the lighting on metal objects is very tricky to photograph and each change in angle, diffusion and color shows a different quality of the object. Thank you for gifting us with this piece.

Blessings,

Magnus

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Patrick,

 

This really is a beautiful work. I second Phil's comments on this one. I appreciate the various photos you took - the lighting on metal objects is very tricky to photograph and each change in angle, diffusion and color shows a different quality of the object. Thank you for gifting us with this piece.

Blessings,

Magnus

 

Thank you Magnus,

I am always trying to improve the photos, but only within a limited budget and my do it your self attitude. One of these days I will have spring for some professional photos.

Regards,

patrick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.


×
×
  • Create New...