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Tsuba Teaser


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Patrick, you haven't show us rest of this set. I saw it on your web page (fuschi and kashira) and now I must say that this is a complete set. Tsuba is wonderful but I had a little hunger for more and when I saw rest I must say that this is what I've ben waiting for. Now it is truly one of finest piece of art that I have seen. Big congratulations. I have personal question, how do you estimate this set, was it difficult for you, or it is just pick of your ability or this is work of your live or maybe just Sunday walk? Please share the secret.

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Armor-All is a greasy product to protect vinyl. Rust-Free is actually formulated to penetrate the metal's surface on a molecular level, (so they claim). It dries completely, leaves no residue and stops any oxidization on metal. They caution about not using on wood or any other material. I cleaned up the excess rust on an old Philippine Kriss blade and the brass guard. It is a very high carbon steel blade and while I left a patina, it never re-rusted. I use it on all damascus and carbon steel. It works great.

Just as an aside....I realize many of us are traditionalists in our craftsmanship and I totally respect that. I personally enjoy the benefits of modern technology to preserve and hasten the completion of my creations.

post-1558-1187788719.jpg

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Patrick, you haven't show us rest of this set. I saw it on your web page (fuschi and kashira) and now I must say that this is a complete set. Tsuba is wonderful but I had a little hunger for more and when I saw rest I must say that this is what I've ben waiting for. Now it is truly one of finest piece of art that I have seen. Big congratulations. I have personal question, how do you estimate this set, was it difficult for you, or it is just pick of your ability or this is work of your live or maybe just Sunday walk? Please share the secret.

 

Hi Bartosz,

I just came back from from the San Francisco Token Kai. I was very busy prepareing for that. The Tsuba went over very well even with the scrutinous eyes of hardcore fittings collectors. I do have the matching Fuchi Kashira finished and updated on the website as you noted. Here is a link for those that are missing them. Dragonfly fuchi kashira update

What is my secret? Practice. I have been practicing bits and pieces and individual techniques on my martial arts grade fittings for many years. At the same time studying design and Japanese aesthetic at shows and in books. Now the real work begins. I am really just starting to pull it all together. My work is still novice, but for the first time I am starting to feel like I have the skills to express myself.

The dragonfly worked well for me, because the Client who commisioned it simply said he wanted Dragonflies and left me with a decent budget. The rest was left to me. Given enough money and freedom I can take the time to be true to my art.

Thank you for the compliments.

Regards,

patrick

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Patrick,

 

I am speechless. The set makes me smile broadly and there are no need for words. Thank you for adding more beauty to the world!

 

I viewed your website and I see you have guilded some 0f your pieces. What technique did you use on your tsuba with the leaves?

 

Fred

 

Thank you Fred,

That was Mercury Amalgum. Ford Hallam actually applied that gold in the UK while I was their learning from him. Mercury Guilding is not something I can do legally here in California USA.

Regards,

Patrick

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Patrick,

 

There has to be a safer way of applying a smooth layer of gold onto a base metal. Plating has never really interested me. Has anyone ever experimented with the possibility of applying gold to copper using the korean method Kuem Boo? It works great on fine silver and you can also apply it to sterling if you enrich the surface using depletion. Gold will similarly adhere easily to iron and steel under low heat and pressure. I have seen some craftsmen use gold leaf on the interior of vessels and I suspect this is using the commercial gold leaf adhesive.

 

Fred

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Patrick,

 

I had a look at your site. Very nicely done! I appreciate your modesty, but you are far from a novice. If this is what you consider the beginnings of you pulling it all together, I look forward to what happens over the next few years.

 

I don't recall the source, but I once read an account published by a London physician, who was studying the various trades in the region during the mid-18th century. In the account were various notes on the metalwork shops, and a cautionary note to the masters not to get involved with fire gilding themselves, as the working-life expectancy of those who did it extensively was only about 2 years. He also noted the high degree of death, and side effects on the population surrounding the gilders workshops. Diderot has a few illustrations of gilderd immersed in fumes while gilding sword fittings in 18th century Paris. I recall a few jests, in a previous post from Ford, about having the neighbors kids do it, but in reality that's how it was done 250 years ago! Nasty business, best to let Ford do it.

 

I have seen, and worked on, a considerable number of pieces of European and Middle-eastern origin with gold foil applied using various techniques, including the under-cut recess, and variations on the cross-hatched, or Nunome Zogane surface (very popular on Islamic damascus blades). One of the most interesting was a Turkish kula kud (helmet) that had extensive gold decoration over a repossé design around the rim. In between the gold foil and the iron was a layer of tin.

 

Phil

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Patrick,

 

I had a look at your site. Very nicely done! I appreciate your modesty, but you are far from a novice. If this is what you consider the beginnings of you pulling it all together, I look forward to what happens over the next few years.

 

I don't recall the source, but I once read an account published by a London physician, who was studying the various trades in the region during the mid-18th century. In the account were various notes on the metalwork shops, and a cautionary note to the masters not to get involved with fire gilding themselves, as the working-life expectancy of those who did it extensively was only about 2 years. He also noted the high degree of death, and side effects on the population surrounding the gilders workshops. Diderot has a few illustrations of gilderd immersed in fumes while gilding sword fittings in 18th century Paris. I recall a few jests, in a previous post from Ford, about having the neighbors kids do it, but in reality that's how it was done 250 years ago! Nasty business, best to let Ford do it.

 

I have seen, and worked on, a considerable number of pieces of European and Middle-eastern origin with gold foil applied using various techniques, including the under-cut recess, and variations on the cross-hatched, or Nunome Zogane surface (very popular on Islamic damascus blades). One of the most interesting was a Turkish kula kud (helmet) that had extensive gold decoration over a repossé design around the rim. In between the gold foil and the iron was a layer of tin.

 

Phil

 

Thank you Phil,

I appreciate the sentiment.

I just do what I do. If I had to choose I will always pick novice or student to describe myself. No matter how much my experience grows, I will always be a student even when teaching. The day I find myself not learning anything is the day I will lose interest and do something else. Luckily Japanese metal work has more than a life time of exploration so I will perpetually be a student. If my work speaks otherwise then I am happy for others that perceive that. I don't wish for people to ooh and aah over my work because I say I am good or even that others say it. I want the work to speak for me and the only way to do that is to be quiet and as humble as I can. It does not always work as we all have ego to contend with :lol: I try to keep the dog barking to a minimum.

I think Today our awareness is such that Mercury can be safely worked with. I still tend to avoid working with toxic substances when at all possible. With mercury recover hoods, clean up kits and if need be there are medical treatments for mercury exposure these days. Again awareness is the key to working with these things and Minimizing there usage. We can always let Ford sacrifice the children that seems like a viable alternative :)

Regards,

patrick

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Patrick,

 

There has to be a safer way of applying a smooth layer of gold onto a base metal. Plating has never really interested me. Has anyone ever experimented with the possibility of applying gold to copper using the korean method Kuem Boo? It works great on fine silver and you can also apply it to sterling if you enrich the surface using depletion. Gold will similarly adhere easily to iron and steel under low heat and pressure. I have seen some craftsmen use gold leaf on the interior of vessels and I suspect this is using the commercial gold leaf adhesive.

 

Fred

 

I think Mercury can be as safe as any other technique. You just need to be aware of the dangers and how to be safe with it. Driving a car very dangerous, but through awareness we manage not to drive off cliffs or into trees. The standard Jewelers electroplating system uses a Cyanide salt for the bath. Talk about dangerous. That is not even regulated here. The only reason Mercury is so controlled is because of the Gold miners letting it get into our river systems and eventually into our bays where it contaminates the food chain via the bottom feeders. Lots of irresponsible people with a lack of awareness for the last two hundred years. I believe that inteligent people can use it safely.

But yes you are right, many ways to apply gold that use less toxic materials. One could always just use solid gold inlays then the application of gold is inert :lol:

Kuem boo is interesting I have often thought about using silver inlays and using the technique to apply gold to those inlays.

Regards,

Patrick

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Hi Patrick,

I just had a chance to go to your link to see this piece in relation to the other fittings - Oh my, what a powerful deepening of effect with all the "layers" put together. Phil is of course right - your work shows a much developed skill. But then again - you are so very right when you observe the perennial student! I myself find that the more I learn and discover, the more I realize that I have only just scratched the surface. What a blessing - such a fantastic Universe - to be immersed in the continual expansion and deepening of appreciation - just to fully be aware of a single Breath is enough . . . and yet there is so much more . . . so very much more . . .

Thanks Patrick,

Blessings,

Magnus

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Of course you are right about the use of mercury. Keum-boo is a relatively easy process that works miraculously. The gauge of gold I use is relatively thick.

 

Fred

 

Hi Fred,

With Keum-boo my references only show it being applied to broad smooth surfaces. In your opinion how well would it work with more 3 dimensional relief carvings. Could you get it to work with for example a high relief Japanese dragon? Intricate detailing scales and all? I know the principle would work, but is it practical in your opinion?

Regards,

Patrick

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Hi Patrick,

I just had a chance to go to your link to see this piece in relation to the other fittings - Oh my, what a powerful deepening of effect with all the "layers" put together. Phil is of course right - your work shows a much developed skill. But then again - you are so very right when you observe the perennial student! I myself find that the more I learn and discover, the more I realize that I have only just scratched the surface. What a blessing - such a fantastic Universe - to be immersed in the continual expansion and deepening of appreciation - just to fully be aware of a single Breath is enough . . . and yet there is so much more . . . so very much more . . .

Thanks Patrick,

Blessings,

Magnus

 

My wife and I going through a deep exploration of the mind and body right now. She is due to have our first child any day now. We have been practicing deep meditation and a sort of hypnosis to help her manage the possible discomfort of labor. It is amazing how deep that single breath can go, figuratively speaking.

regards,

Patrick

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Patrick,

I suspect with compex detail you would need to cut and place individual pieces of gold on each scale. Not sure how practical that might be. I do know that you can manipulate the gold on some lightly textured surfaces. It might be worth my while to try putting some gold on the back of a beetle I am shaping in silver. I am more of a chasing guy and use carving to embelish detail. My energy is directed in too many tangents at the moment. I have orders to fill and I am always wanting to learn and experiment. Since gold is so maleable, perhaps it could be adheared in several heatings and gently shaped around and over each scale. Not sure....

Fred

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My thoughts are with you both as you anticipate the welcoming of your child to this world. The remarkable event is followed with wonders and things you cannot imagine. As you are about to meet your child, ours is about to leave home to live in a dormitory to attend junior and senior years at an arts high school, and for us the anticipation of this step brings joy and tears combined. I miss the baby and the little boy as the young man child departs. You have an awesome trip ahead for you! Blessings to you three.

 

Janel

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well here is Joya and Patrick's latest work of art :blink:

post-40-1189373260.jpg

All went well and we are adjusting to life with a baby. He was born with light red hair and his name Aedan, happens to mean "little fire" ;) How neat is that! Born on labor day 7.5 pounds. The previous alert ended up being the start of a week of suffering, but last monday (labor day) the ducks lined up and everything worked like it should.

You can see more pics if you are so inclined, here.

Thanks for the positive energy!

Regards,

Patrick Joya and Little Fire

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