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Pheasant


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We've had far too much metal on display lately :P , so I finally found some time to grab a camera and take a few shots of a piece I finished this past Spring. It's carved in boxwood, with amber and pearl shell details.

All comments and critiques welcome (except on the quality of my photography :lol::) )

 

-Doug

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Hi Doug,

 

It's very good to see some straight on wood carving. I like this piece. I'm not sure what I thinkabout the hole in between the wings. I also am not sure what I think of the pearls on the grasses. I really like the knot hole. I love the posture and the suggestion of field acomplished with subtle integration of the plant elements. Overall the piece has a lovely and graceful feel to it - very pleasing lines. Thank you for sharing.

 

Magnus

P.S.

What is the size of this carving?

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Thanks for the thoughtful reply-

With the hole between the wings- I knew that I wanted to use the hollow stump as the exit hole for a cord attachment, so it left me little option for the placement of the entry hole, once considerations of balance and position when hung were taken. That left me with the area of the body beneath the tail feathers.

With the carvings I'm doing lately, I'm trying to develop a balance with areas receiving a lot of attention- visually and texturally - with areas that are just smooth and relatively untouched.

 

The pearl insets on the grasses are designed to bring the viewer's eye down from the top of the tail feathers, across the grasses and then to the head and amber eyes.

 

The size is about 2 1/2" x 1" x 1" (or 70mm x 23 x 23).

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Hi Doug,

 

I've been thinking about the scale of this piece and imagining it properly fitted with it's cord (please remember I'm a neophyte when it comes to netsuke) - in that context, the Himotoshi ( as I should say rather than "hole") makes complete sense, and as a functional aspect of the piece, no longer distracts. I would imagine this carving is even more delightful when held in the hand. Thanks again, Doug.

Blessings,

Magnus

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Janel: not sure what's next- maybe my poochie post-10-1184329467.jpgpost-10-1184329474.jpg

 

Phil: The piece conformed to the shape of the wood. With a pheasant in mind, the conventional way would have been to orient the wood to lay on the long side, but I wanted to accompany it with some grasses, so a vertical orientation seemed better. It was an enjoyable exercize trying to conform the shape into a compact 'S' curve.

 

Magnus: I really want to begin incorporating the cord attachment into the form of the subject, but this particular pheasant and shape just resisted :lol: and I had to opt for the plain as day location.

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  • 1 month later...
Guest ford hallam

Hi Doug,

 

I'm sorry but I somehow completely missed this piece of yours. Actually having just looked at the date when you posted it I see why, we were moving house and I had no internet connection for a few weeks. Apologies :)

 

I like the piece, your idea to simplify some areas and contrast then with other areas of fine detail looks as though it's worth persuing.

 

If I may I'd make one suggestion by way of critique. The grasses bother me, the way they are carved in such shallow relief and by necessity conform to the form of the bird. This, to my eye, robs them of their potential to express "grassyness". They appear limp and lifeless as a result. I realise that carving the blades of grass in such a way as to allow their own nature to be shown would be tricky but I feel the risk would be worth taking. Perhaps some sort of basket like effect would allow you to retain some strength in the wood while still giving the impression of a tangle of delicate grasses in which the bird huddles.

 

Cheers, Ford

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Hi doug,

 

Well it's a nice carving what you show us here.

Looking forward to see your doggie!

For the grass it could have some more depth on the backside (is that what ford means???)

but on the side where that trunk is it looks great!

 

And have to say you're right, way to much metal-posts and where are the miniature carvers who use wood, antler and ivory?

Love to see some more woody things.

 

So if you are working on your doggie, maybe you can show us your progress???

Thanx and good luck!

B_art79

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Thanks for the comments guys. The grass was definitely a 'conceptual' decision. I was thinking about whether it was possible to have one form emerge from another, but in hindsight I think it would involve keeping everything at a certain level of abstraction. A bit like Clive Hallam's heron and reeds that appears in a couple of publications... The pheasant would be more likely to emerge from the grass (or background) rather than the other way around. Still, I'm pretty happy with the way the bird, log, and grass are incorporated together.

 

-Also learning that carving scenes or vignettes is much more difficult than say a horse, or dog, or sack of potatoes. A lot of elements to balance.

 

-Cheers,

Doug

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