Jump to content

Come into my parlor, said the spider to the fly...


tsterling

Recommended Posts

Tried another steel practice plate, this time taking inspiration from a kozuka I surfed across while looking through a link one of us posted here.

 

I did find that a properly sharpened graver makes all the difference in the world - now that I have proper sharpening equipment. Before, I was able to make the formerly hand sharpened graver work, but it was definitely a hit-or-miss proposition.

 

The spider and fly were done with a Lindsay AirGraver Palm Control, a single 90 degree high speed steel graver, and two dental burrs (1 larger, 1 smaller) in an NSK hand grinder (electric, not air). The plate is two inches long, so the fly is quite tiny at 1/4th of an inch long (6mm), and the spider is about 5/8ths on an inch long (15mm).

 

Now to attempt the same thing on a knife handle...

 

My apologies for the cruddy images, but this metal stuff is a complete bear to photograph...

post-11-1187124578.jpg

post-11-1187124590.jpg

post-11-1187125287.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest ford hallam

Hi Tom,

 

thats looking pretty tidy. The background texture is very effective too...I may "steal" it sometime :blush:

 

keep tapping away, cheers, Ford

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the encouraging words, gents! It's good to know I'm starting to find my way in this metal jungle.

 

Tom,

What kind of sharpening equipment are you using? With the HSS steel gravers I need to get something better than the old fashoned (100 years old) stuff I have.

Thanks,

Dick

 

Dick and David, I got a GRS Power Hone and a Paul Hamler sharpening fixture (it's set up specifically for the "Lindsay" grind). Both work really well - I used a 600 grit diamond wheel for the HSS sharpening. I didn't really see the need for a finer grit for "deep" carving. Previously I was just hand sharpening on my knife stones. That worked, but this new setup is definitely better. I'm getting cleaner and deeper cuts - and I don't think that can all be attributed to practice.

 

Ford, I hate to tell you how I did the background texture, falling from grace so to speak... But it was easy, and took a good 10 minutes (and I may be wildly exaggerating at that estimate). I simply used the smallest carbide dental burr to scratch in a series of (sort of scribbled) parallel lines, then went over it in the same manner with the larger carbide burr, digging it in a little as I went. Then, went over the whole thing with ScotchBrite pads in mandrels in my flexible shaft machine (it's slower than the NSK).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest ford hallam

Shame on you Tom :blush:;)

 

don't get me wrong though, I've got no problem with power tools per se. In fact I'm a bit of a dab hand with the angle-grinder :D. My own preference for working in the way I choose is that for me it delivers what I'm looking for. The texture you created is very effective and it works, the way you achieved it is "invisible".

 

regards, Ford

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the encouraging words, gents! It's good to know I'm starting to find my way in this metal jungle.

Dick and David, I got a GRS Power Hone and a Paul Hamler sharpening fixture (it's set up specifically for the "Lindsay" grind). Both work really well - I used a 600 grit diamond wheel for the HSS sharpening. I didn't really see the need for a finer grit for "deep" carving. Previously I was just hand sharpening on my knife stones. That worked, but this new setup is definitely better. I'm getting cleaner and deeper cuts - and I don't think that can all be attributed to practice.

 

Tom, the GRS Power Hone is very good. I believe Lindsay has hones in various grits for it. The way Lindsay comes up with new tool ideas I wouldn't be surprised if he invents a better power sharpener.

 

I like seeing the extremely precise engraving tools used for deeper carving. At some point I hope to have one of the AirGravers and the other necessary tools for engraving, not so much so that I can cut great scrolls on my knives and pens, but to refine and enhance my carving.

 

Glen is right, this would be great for a tsuba.

 

David

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Shame on you Tom :blush::D

 

don't get me wrong though, I've got no problem with power tools per se. In fact I'm a bit of a dab hand with the angle-grinder :). My own preference for working in the way I choose is that for me it delivers what I'm looking for. The texture you created is very effective and it works, the way you achieved it is "invisible".

 

regards, Ford

 

I did take a small jab at your broad shoulders with tongue stuck very deeply in my cheek, Ford! ;) That said, I have made a small number of chisels and punches ala Hallam, and while I use power tools whenever possible (since I learned on them an am more comfortable with them), I have discovered that sometimes hand tools do indeed work better. For instance, where you need to snip a small piece off in a tight little corner, I use a tiny "onglette-looking" thing stolen from your inlay tutorial. It's very small and delicate, and using something like it in the AirGraver would probably result in constantly breaking the tip off. Often the same with the punches, since I can get a much deeper impression by hand than in the AirGraver. So, thanks to your and Jim Kelso's tutelage, I try to use the tool I can best accomplish the desired result with, at least to the limits of my knowledge.

 

I've been haunting the halls of engraving forums lately, and they have a lot of interesting and useful tips. Mostly that is about cutting traditional-style scrolls, and doesn't always directly apply to what we are doing here. But, to hear the grey beard's horror/war stories about learning to hand engrave with hammer and chisel makes me appreciate the ease of learning that the power engraving tools allow.

 

David, I've been very impressed with the Lindsay AirGraver, and I noticed that Lindsay announced recently that he will be producing another sharpening holding fixture in about a month - he seems very innovative. It'll be very interesting to see what this new one looks like and compare it to the Hamler.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...