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Hatching Snake


Janel

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A series of photos, in progress and some quick photos when completed. The egg is made of tagua-nut, the eyes are acryl-glass and the tongue is from silver, carved. The case is amber and the snake boxwood. Enjoy:

 

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Once again, I am amazed at the quality and how well he has thought out his subject and materials to compose a complete piece of artwork. I particularly like how he has give the egg the sense that it is maleable by carving the bulge and slightly broken surface. I suspect the egg could be laquered boxwood. or perhaps even delrin.

 

Bravo Cornel!

 

Fred

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We've talked about tagua nuts before, but I think here is a very good example of how this material is more effective than ivory in some instances.

The tagua has just the right amount of oily-ness and translucency to give the impression of a wet, flexible reptile egg. I'd like to see the piece in person to get a view of the tongue- I think it can be difficult to mix boxwood and metals from an aesthetic standpoint.

 

-Doug

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Hi Kathleen!

 

I don't know what type of amber this is, but living where he does, it may be Baltic amber. The disc shapes in the amber are something I have seen in other pieces of amber. Some special conditions must have encouraged those dramatic reflective fractures to form.

 

Janel

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Dimmetrius, this Hatching Snake is by Cornel Schneider, Switzerland. I am just the posting person. I do not know how long it takes for Cornel to carve a piece, but he made reference to this piece taking less time than the lizard on the bone piece, also posted in the New Work, Show and Tell forum area.

 

Could the fractures also occur by being present in a forest fire, or near by flash fire during the thousands of years it was where it landed, and not an intentional human caused effect?

 

Janel

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Dimmetrius, I don't think I welcomed you to the forum before, my apologies. Good to have you here with us.

 

I must say I find this discussion about amber facinating. One of the few things I do remember from my apprenticeship days and studying basic gemology was the tell-tale signs of the various Amber substitutes. These particular "fish-scale" fractures within a large piece of amber invariably indicate reconstituted material. This is when lesser quality material, broken bits and shavings, etc,are melted together to create lumps of solid, flawless Amber. I believe the effect seen here is as a result of the internal stresses that naturally occur as the mass cools.

 

but then again who knows...... :)

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