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Color


Janel

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Thank you Bart for suggesting this topic.

 

Please start your search for topics regarding color by visiting the compilation Tom Sterling has done and has posted in the Getting Started and Resources forum area: Finishes and Coloring Tutorials and Techniques, How to color and finish wood, antler, ivory and tagua.

 

Lets ask questions, make reference to earlier posts (add links when they could be useful), and share knowledge here.

 

Janel

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Ok so let's start off than...

I color boxwood the same way Ko Baas does.

Here is a tutorial wich he placed on TCP earlier....

http://www.thecarvingpath.net/forum/index....amp;hl=coloring

 

only I use not 52% nitric acid but 64%, not because it works better but that's what I can get at my work...

Thing is that (in holland) you can not get it in the store anymore, is ilegal I think

 

After this process I use a special dye, called dylon (excally it's to color cloths)

You got to different ones, a cold version and a warm version

I use the warm one and dip my work in it for just a few seconds.

Than I cool it in cold water. I repeat this untill it has the good color

 

After this I polish the work and than I paint it with black ink wich I mix with water

I polish again and well than it's done!!!!

 

Thing is that with this technique I can not use different colors, so I would like to learn other dyings.........

 

Cheers B_art

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Thank you Bart for getting this going.

 

Do you let the wood dry between immersion in the dye? Or, do you just wipe the wetness off and dip again?

 

You mention different color use, would that be a single color, or multiple colors on a single piece?

 

There are fabric dyes used by USA artists, David Carlin being the main user of such a style. That particular dye is named Procion. Dry dyes are poisonous to breath, and will stain anything it floats on to, so care in handling and use are important.

 

Janel

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Hi Janel,

I don't really let the piece dry in between dipping, I just get it out to prevent cracks.

You see, the dye is just boiling low and the temp will crack your piece if it stays to long in it's coloring bath.

 

These dyes I use, you can get it many different colors but you can't use it on the same piece, so I was wondering how to use different colors on one piece...

 

Cheers, B_art 79

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Hi Bart,

 

The multi colored pieces by David Carlin, and others who use the fabric dyes, will use a small brush to apply the color to the particular areas they wish to be colored. I apologize, but I do not know if a single application is used, or what other techniques might be part of the process. Look at the examples on the web site I linked to above, and see what they look like. I chose to not follow that path with coloration, but using the variety of colors of fabric dye, applied with a brush, is one way to make multiple colors on boxwood.

 

Janel

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Multiple applications of Procion dye (simply a high-quality fabric dye, any brand will actually work) will deepen the color on boxwood, since it is so dense it doesn't soak in very quickly or deeply. There is a trick to using multiple colors, however. There must be some means of separating the different colors, or a color from undyed wood. You can use a small v-cut to carve a "ditch" that the color won't run across, unless you get a large drop too close to the cut. I use a small paintbrush and work from the inside of the area CAREFULLY out to the edge of the cut. Work slowly and deliberately here, letting each application dry thoroughly before the next dye application.

 

You can also use a woodburner to burn (lightly) the separating cut, which works even better than the small v-cut. The lignins in the wood are somewhat waxy and melt, creating a fairly waterproof "ditch." However, the same warning - getting a large drop near the v-cut or burn will allow the color to bridge the gap and then get onto/into the wood beyond.

 

A little TSP (tri-sodium phosphate) added to the dye/distilled water mix will help penetration. I suspect the TSP acts simply as a wetting agent, so other wetting agents like detergent may work as well if TSP isn't available in Europe.

 

Also, the colors are quite transparent, so you need to take into account the natural color of the background wood. For example, a very yellow boxwood will end up appearing somewhat green if a transparent blue dye is applied. If this is a problem, you can bleach the wood to get closer to a white canvas.

 

If you want a smooth gradation of colors, I've had a little luck occasionally using multiple colors using a watercolor-like wet-in-wet technique. Obviously, this is pretty unpredictable, and requires some practice. Your mileage will vary...

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Hi tom,

Sounds really interesting, I think I use the same dye as procion but than a different name.

So I was wondering, you use it, mixed with cold water right?

Can you use this dye in oil as well, so it gets in the wood better?

And what about rubbing the powder of the dye sraight on the wood? Is there some technique for that as well?

Anyway I know what to do this sunday...

Thanx tom

Looking forward to more techniques...

 

Oww one more thing, Tom you use a burner or a v-tool to saperate the colors on your work right?

So what about rubber cement would this do the same?

If it does, you don't have to make a v-grove or burn-marks...

Any experience with this?

 

Cheers B_art79

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So I was wondering, you use it, mixed with cold water right?

Can you use this dye in oil as well, so it gets in the wood better?

And what about rubbing the powder of the dye sraight on the wood? Is there some technique for that as well?

 

Oww one more thing, Tom you use a burner or a v-tool to saperate the colors on your work right?

So what about rubber cement would this do the same?

If it does, you don't have to make a v-grove or burn-marks...

Any experience with this?

Cheers B_art79

 

Hi B_art79,

 

I just mix with distilled water, and a tiny knife-tip amount of TSP (I'm mixing well less than a milliliter in a medicine cup, for most of my work - goes a long way on a netsuke-sized carving). Don't know about oil, but you can experiment and report back. Also have never tried just the powder on the wood - ditto on the experiment. I think I'd be concerned that it would rub off, or get wet during the finishing process and then spread or get blotchy looking.

 

One carver I know has had a lot of success using a masking agent - I think it's the standard watercolor art miskit(?) sort of stuff. Of course, you're trying to mask a porous material, so there can be some running under the mask, depending on the character of the wood, and the direction of the grain. Boxwood should behave very well, however.

 

I don't ever use a v-tool, I've never seen one I thought made a fine enough cut. If I need a v-groove, I just make two intersecting cuts with a knife. We're talking a VERY small groove... Also, modern woodburners are capable of very small lines, and relatively little heat so they don't leave much color behind - we're talking about the kind of woodburners used by the bird carvers, with tiny knife-sharp burning tips.

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Hello,

 

Well I tested some things with dylon 32

here is the website for info: http://www.dylon.co.uk/colourcentre/index.htm

 

Under you see my small test.....

 

The first I used the powder with a drip of water,

First dipped my finger in the water and than in the dye

than I rubbed it on the wood ( using rubber gloves of course...)

 

Second is just the powder on the wood

 

and Thurth is with oil

 

The colorline beneath is for control

This color is an indicator for a white cloth or something

so it's more or less comparing apples with pears....

 

post-769-1190634534.jpg

 

Anyway, with a simple drip of water you get the best resold I believe.

This one is the most intense and everywhere about the same density (?)

 

When you put the dye on a piece of wood, in powder form it will give color to anything which get in contact with it

Secondly the color is way of it's oiginal and is not with the same density

 

With oil I believe your own oppinion is gonna come in. The color is softer and not even comparisible with it's origine

but it gives a really nice and pleasant effect since you can see the woods structere really good.

 

So if you like soft colours which are more natural you can use oil

If you like screaming colors you can use a drip of water

 

I also would like to mansion that I used the same amounth of powder for every bid....

Offcourse when using one off this methods you should try it on a spare piece first....

 

For Tom...

I used plane painters-tape between the coloring, could not find my rubber-cement, that's what you get right if you move to another house.............

 

Maybe my next test will be how to keep the colors sappereted :unsure:

 

Cheers, B_art79

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