Jump to content

Rabbits


Mark Strom

Recommended Posts

As I mentioned in the thread on scale I am working on several small projects. The carved area on these is about 6" x 8" or 15.24 cm x 12.32 cm I hope the metric conversion is correct, not very good at it.

 

There is still work to be done in rounding and clean up. Waiting on the burrs to carve the fur. These are purely experimental but have been a lot of fun to do. Feel free to critique or comment.

 

Mark

post-727-1191396090.jpg

post-727-1191396105.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest ford hallam

Hi Mark,

 

those are good to see. I particularly like the one on the right, the texture left by the chisels is very suggestive. I'm actually trying to something similar at the moment with an imperious toad. Your hare is a helpful inspiration this morning.

 

Thanks also for helping to revive the "aesthetics of scale" thread, I read your post, and the others, with interest. When I get a bit of a break I'll add some further thoughts of my own. I'll also reply to your question regarding working in a totally foreign art world, as you guessed, it has been a very "enlightening" experience.

 

thanks again, regards,

 

Ford

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Mark,

The bass relief sculptures of the two rabbits are beautiful. You captured the poise and musculature wonderfully. The carved fur and chisel marks both work. I think it is an artistic choice as to which texture you use. Did you do preliminary drawings? Thanks for sharing them with us.

Dick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We raise English Spot rabbits, whose fur is smooth and not fluffy. Only the self/agouti variety would show the texture of the top rabbit carving, which by the way is very successful. One could enjoy stroking the fur of this wood rabbit with eyes and fingers.

 

The contrast of fur to background of the top rabbit is effective. The chisel marks on the rabbit could be sanded to soften the cutting lines a bit would also be a strong and effective technique, for my eyes. Keep the treatment different between the foreground and background chisel marks, and the subtle difference will gently separate the rabbit from its surroundings. As it is in nature.

 

Janel

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the comments.

 

Dick, the designs came from a variety of sources and observations. Both are based on paintings. I do have some wonderful research books on just about any animal and quite a skull collection to reference from which helps tremendously with musculature. As I said, I dropped my camera and have been unable to photograph the rabbits in my yard so I resorted to other things. Now that I have a new camera we are back in business.

 

Ford, the textures are loose and open to change. I stopped texturing the one because the carving burr was to coarse and large. New burrs are on the way so I will be able to continue the experiment. I do not know if I will put fur on both of them. I like the carving marks on the one but if left they will have to be refined to better suit the movement of fur.

 

Janel, thanks for the suggestions. The backgrounds are still up in the air as to treatment. Working on this scale has me somewhat at a loss as to what tools to use and what affect to go for. Plus I am trying to do something I have never done before...it will come to me.

 

Ford, I look forward to your insights concerning working in another cultural environment.

 

Again thanks for the comments.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mark,

Thanks for posting the new work. I like where they're heading very much, but I think I'll reserve comments until the final product. They do look like a bit of departure from the other items you've shared with us. Maybe a little more formal?

 

-Doug

p.s. I'm jealous of your skull collection

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Doug,

You mean I have to show the finished work!? and put them up for a real critique!? Just when I thought I had it made with all the positive feedback.

 

Please feel free to comment as they probably will not change in any radical way. Got my burrs today and will be trying them out over the next few days.

 

As for more formal, not sure about that but they are definitely more simplified. I will be posting something in the next few days that is a major departure from what has been posted so far. As far as that goes it is a radical departure from the rest of my work.

 

Mark

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice work Mark!

 

They have a life about them. I do agree with Janel's suggestions re background.

 

I would have assumed that hand tools were used exclusively, if you had not mentioned that you had used burrs for the background. It's just a personal preference, but I'm not a big fan of their use in a final product, although you seem to have carried it off well. At this point, I fear that I may be falling victim to one of my favorite sayings here in that "unfinished work is best not seen by fools or children".

 

Phil

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest ford hallam
"unfinished work is best not seen by fools or children".
;):)

 

Hi Phil, I love that saying, I may have to put that notice on the door of my studio....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Phil,

The burrs are part of the experiment. I have found that not only can I move as fast using hand tools but there is more control versus mechanical means. The fur was done using the burrs is what I think you meant.

 

As for the quote...you can bet that it will be brought into the light frequently ...outstanding!

 

Thanks

Mark

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Ford about the chisel marks. It would add that "artsy" quality, that we debate about, if you morphed the rabbit out of the rough chisel marks into the finely detailed and show the steps as it were.

But I like 'em!

You know I just remembered a picture by M. C. Escher like that where the outer perimeters started out as a rough drawing and by the time he got to the center it was like a photo. Coffee must be kicking in.

post-1558-1191584173.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mark second rabbit is really great. I prefer it more. I hope this is finished piece. I will not add anything to it. Shades and chisel marks are great and gives nice dynamic. And the contrast between sharp line on ears and soft waves on body are very tasteful. It is very art deco. Also expression on it's face is well done. One can see that this is quiet and peaceful scene and rabbit is almost asleep.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh btw, I remembered something. When I was on second year of my study we had a subject "rabbit". We had real quite big rabbit living in our workshop. He was very friendly and some times even rude. He hit us when we were eating and didn't share with him. And this is what I have done then.

It is my impression of him, he was always licking himself with his big red tongue so I did big rabbit face with tongue. It was about one meter high and deep width, it was a carpet on foamed polystyrene. It was hanging on the wall.

 

rabbit.jpg

 

rabbit2.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Mark,

 

You see, that's why I am hesitant to offer comments on photos of the work posted, they just don't give you a real sense of the piece, or the techniques used. Now I have fallen victim to another of my favorite sayings: "better to remain silent and thought a fool, than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt"

 

Phil

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Doug,

The color you see on the eye is thin instant glue. The material is basswood which is really soft and prone to crumbling when trying to achieve thin edges. Undercutting the eyelid created such an edge so I applied the instant glue, carved the area and brushed on more glue to keep it from breaking. The glue disappears after a finish of lacquer or shellac is applied.

 

Mark

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...