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Negative space material


Janel

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As I put the dusts and shavings from my carving activites into the little waste basket by my bench, I wonder what you all do with the results of your labors. After years and years, could have been twleve if I never emptied it before, my little waste container was totally full. If it were to be valued at the price of the pieces all made and sold from those carving actions, that was a hefty bucket of waste, after all those years. I don't generate a lot of waste with my work I guess, little pieces... I looked at that and wondered what to do with it. Not much, so I put it in the garden by the pathway last summer. It does not look like much now, and may have already disappeared into the soil.

 

So, what do you do with it all?

 

Janel

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Dear Folks,

What to say, I work with bone, so the only thing that I do, following a friend´s advice, is to collect my bone dust and spread it in my garden, he told me that´s great for the soil. AH! And sometimes when my dog needs an extra winter calories, following my Vet´s advice, I mix the clean powder with its food.

Hugs,

Sebas

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Mark,

As a Master Gardener, I feel that I should tell you that you really should compost those shavings and sawdust for at least a year, mixing in some "greens" i.e. grass clippings, old leaf veggies, etc. If you don't the sawdust will leach tannic acid into the soil. Some plants and shrubs like lower pH but not terribly low. This will tie up the nutrients (mostly nitrogen) in the soil and prevent them from being utilized by your plants.

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Thanks Mike, the caution about the wood chips is a good one. I wondered about that, but my bucket holds about 6 quarts. Not a big pile. I use rabbit manure (we have loads of it) for soil amendment, with some peat mixed in. The clay soil likes it, and the plants do too. Maybe that will help offset the drawbacks of the raw wood dusts.

 

It is fun to read about what you all do with the remains of the work we do.

 

Janel

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If the sawdust or shavings are mixed into the mulch there probably will not be a problem if the mulch is thick enough. I do use walnut, mahogany and other exotics in areas where I do not want things to go (away from plants) as they have natural growth suppressants in them and could kill landscaping plants. A fairly large amount of oak material will have the same effect as the walnut.

Sawdust also will pack over time and the water will just run off with the sawdust forming almost a particle board type consistency. Happy gardening!

 

Mark

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