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Mosaic damscus opening


fitzo

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Sorry if this ends up in the wrong forum, but after Rick's jellyroll I offered to post fotos of opening up a mosaic damascus billet.

 

When some pattern welded steel is made, the pattern runs lengthwise down the billet. In order to expose it to the outside for blade use, one must employ some method of creating a "mosaic". One way is to cut the billet into sections, turn 90* to expose it, then forge weld the segments together. Another method is called "accordian unfolding", which I will demonstrate here.

 

This first foto is of the end of the billet, the pattern I wish to expose. I believe this is commonly called "crushed w's".

 

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This is the layout for the accordian. At the inner apex of the triangles, holes are drilled to provide a curved edge to avoid shearing the bar when it is flattened. (This is a foto of a different billet.)

 

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In order to make the billet flatten properly, the sharp edges are ground off. I ground this one with a large radius, which will create an alternating pattern, as you'll see in the last foto.

 

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After cutting and grinding, the billet is heated very hot in the forge, and slowly flattened with a 25 ton hydraulic press. Slow and hot is necessary to avoid shearing the steel. The large radius of the triangles created an alternating tiled appearance in the finished billet, ready to forge a blade.

 

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Hope you enjoyed the slideshow.....

 

Mod's, please move this if appropriate. Thanks!

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Guest DFogg

Kat,

 

There is another way of making patterns using powdered metals. I have an short description of the process on my web site Mosaics

 

What is interesting about this process is that you can lay up very intricate patterns using different alloys and separate them using paper. Another sculptural aspect that really hasn't been explored in the knife business is working working within molds. So when heat and weld the powder is compress into a form creating the pattern in the shape of the mold. Many parts are made this way in industry, but so far no artists have played with the possibilities.

 

It does require some equipment, but so does pattern welding.

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Fitzo!

thanx for posting the pics, they look good.  Did you weld up the little triangles that were left?

 

Rik

 

 

You're welcome, Rik and Kat! Glad you liked the fotos.

 

I haven't welded the scraps yet. I'm saving some up to try with some powder in a can. After seeing the stuff Cliff Parker is getting with mosaic scraps re-welded, I hope to make some "collage" material like his and these scraps may work in that.

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