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Tasmanian devil


Simon F

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Some photos of my last carving. (Janel - I hope I have conformed to the photo requirements of the forum! and that there are not too many in one hit... :blink: )

 

After struggling with carving originals for a number of castings (casting can be frustrating... :blink: ) I decided to start the year with a simple :huh: piece that I didn't have to consider the casting constraints. The further I got through it the more annoyed I got as I made error in judgment after error :o . It was a test of perseverance to see it through, but I fugured I need the practice...

 

Here it is from sketches to finish

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The style of this carving is more of a characterization than my previous carvings and I think that it has turned out even more 'dumbed down' than I meant it to be. I'd welcome observations from everyone - be interesting to see if they are the same as my own!

 

Cheers

Simon

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Simon,

I quite like this little fella. He really made me smile.

There's a playfulness in the carving I find very appealing.

I also find that the way you dealt with the fur is pretty good, particularly as I can see in the last two pictures.

 

thanks for showing us your work,

-t

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Simon,

I quite like this little fella. He really made me smile.

There's a playfulness in the carving I find very appealing.

I also find that the way you dealt with the fur is pretty good, particularly as I can see in the last two pictures.

 

thanks for showing us your work,

-t

 

Thanks. The playful, wicked/naughtyness was something i was trying for and think the look in the eyes helps with this. I was happy with how the eyes turned out, though not with their placement. I'm pleased that this was the thing you picked up on.

 

thanks for commenting

cheers

Simon

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Simon,

I think it's great, it made me smile and think of all the puppies I have had to deal with in my life. The exicution of the piece is great down to the pads on his feet, the hair, and the eyes. It does have that character nature to it but I like it, it works for the subject in my opinion.

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Hi Simon,

 

I like this too. I am more drawn to your more realistic pieces I've seen, but this works well for the style. The eyes are quite effective. I'm impressed with your drawings. I love your work in general. Thanks for sharing.

 

Magnus

 

Thankyou all! I feel rather better about this piece after your kind comments.

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I am home now, and the litmus test against my soda straw land line and your images is a good one. You did well with the sizes. Thanks!

 

It is fun to see you exploring the narrative story, and the fur/hair. What are the eyes inlaid with? Can you snap a closeup of your signature to share with us?

 

Janel

 

Hmm, signatures, sounds like another topic or two! Any one game?

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I am home now, and the litmus test against my soda straw land line and your images is a good one. You did well with the sizes. Thanks!

 

It is fun to see you exploring the narrative story, and the fur/hair. What are the eyes inlaid with? Can you snap a closeup of your signature to share with us?

 

Janel

 

Hmm, signatures, sounds like another topic or two! Any one game?

 

 

Hi Janel

 

Glad the image sizes were right. I have had the misfortune of the dial-up connections in the past, and being of recipient list of people who are at work in large corporations with very fast connections. I said a lot of nasty things when their large file jokes froze up my machine.... :rolleyes:

 

The eyes were inlaid with beef (i think, as it's a piece that i've had for a long time) bone first, then drilled out to receive a piece of horn -which I think is buffalo, but might just be cow (same story as the bone).

 

Signature? As in signing the piece? I haven't signed this, though have been trying to decide what I'll use for a signature. For my jewelry I have a stamp that is a small sun with an arrow through it. The sun because my surname is Fairweather and the arrow harks back to my history in archery. Before getting going with jewelry I was a full time archer from when I left school till a few years ago. Cost me 20 years of career development, but at the old age of 38 I have had the pleasure of 5 Olympic Games - one of which I won, along with a world championship. Happy memories but not much financial payback. And now I want to be a carver!!! Some people just don't learn :o;) ha ha. I have been doodling different arrangements with my initials but haven't settled on anything. Maybe I'll stick with the jewelry stamp design - either carving it, which might end up a pain, or stamping it in silver or gold and inlaying it???

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Hi Simon,

 

I thought that little bit under the critter's arm was a signature reserve, but it must be the ends of the shoe laces. Oops.

 

Thank you for explaining your jewelery stamp, and its symbolism. You have quite a history of dedication and success with archery. Thank you for sharing this with us! I hope that carving is as rewarding a challenge in its own way!

 

I'll start a signature thread in Tools and Technical. Maybe it might help you or any others of us to answer this little design problem. It took me years to figure out the one I use now.

 

Janel

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Simon- I know exactly what you mean with the terms 'characterization' and 'dumbed down' (as concepts) as I'm struggling with this myself. To me, if you set yourself to the task of naturalistic representation, it's much easier to visualize the final goal, and to know if you've been successful or not. Stylization and characterization is much more difficult as we're generally working against the mind's eye as comparison, and decision making is tough in knowing what features to exaggerate or supress.

When I've tried to stray away from realism, it seems like the carvings end up being 'Disney'-like. Perhaps you're feeling this too?

Your sketches show the playfulness and wickedness- centered on the eyes and teeth of the face, and the posture. Your carving lacks a bit of articulation in the joints and bone structure in the face, which is maybe causing the feelings you have?

Your degree of finish and attention is excellent!

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Simon- I know exactly what you mean with the terms 'characterization' and 'dumbed down' (as concepts) as I'm struggling with this myself. To me, if you set yourself to the task of naturalistic representation, it's much easier to visualize the final goal, and to know if you've been successful or not. Stylization and characterization is much more difficult as we're generally working against the mind's eye as comparison, and decision making is tough in knowing what features to exaggerate or supress.

When I've tried to stray away from realism, it seems like the carvings end up being 'Disney'-like. Perhaps you're feeling this too?

Your sketches show the playfulness and wickedness- centered on the eyes and teeth of the face, and the posture. Your carving lacks a bit of articulation in the joints and bone structure in the face, which is maybe causing the feelings you have?

Your degree of finish and attention is excellent!

 

Good point Doug. Yes in particular the face is bothersome to me now. it's too shapeless and I've put the eyes too far apart and too far away from the muzzle. In the drawing the eyes are closer to the muzzle than the top. Disney did come to mind too ha ha.

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