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Lonnie Jones

micro motor tools

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:lol:;) I like to play! I like scraps too, they are the right size, so far, with what I have been doing.

 

Once, I sent a scrap from a piece of wood I had carved to the friend who had sent his scrap to me for use. I wanted an ID of it, and asked that he return it to me. He was astounded! The piece that I wanted returned was about 3/4" x 1/4'. It did get carved eventually and became this. And, someone purchased it! What a hoot!

 

I have no idea what to do with metal damascus scraps, but I am sure there are enough of yous guys to push me in a variety of directions!

 

Janel

 

I wonder, do you use the scraps for anything?

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I thought that I would add my 5 cents worth on the subject of micro-motor tools. I graduated this last may with a Degree in Dental Laboratory Technology. Micro-Motors are our lifeblood of working tools. I must say that I am most impressed with NSK products. This is not an endorsement, but an experienced use of their products. I have used OSADA, Wells, Buffalo, Brasseler and a variety of others. I also did the purchasing of handpieces for our lab class. I personally own a NSK Presto Air Driven handpiece a Cadillac type version of the turbo carver. It has all the torque one needs for doing any of your carving detail. It works well on Metal and other similar items. I use both Carbides and Diamonds. You have to make sure that the bur is doing the work, so as to relieve tension on the bearings. The turbines are about 150 to replace, but you will have to do alot of work for there replacement.

Another nice feature of the NSK Presto is its no need for lubrication, and its patented air release nozzle. In other words as you carve the air driving the turbine is released through the nose cone to blow the dust of the material you are working away. Makes detail carving really nice. They also run at 300,000 to 450,00 rpms so it makes etching and carving glass a breeze as well.

Additionally the NSK Volvere and Electer EMAX as Janel mention are the workhorses of the industry as well. Not to mention they have interchangeable nose cones for a variety of different applications. They are pricey, but anyone who uses tools on a daily basis knows how frustrating it is to have a handpiece go down. You get what you pay for as the ole addage says.

I personally owned both types and love them. I was introduced to air driven micro tools when Dr. Lew Jensen started Paragraphics, Which is now Profitable Hobbies. I purchased his high speed carving kit only to years later find out that the price I paid was extremely inflated. Likewise with SCM corporation. They have wonderful marketing, but for the price of the tools you can get them quite a bit cheaper.

I have done eggs, antler, knives, wood, glass, stones and precious metals with all of them and my experience has been to save up and buy the best you can. It sure is dissapointing to be really getting into your project then your key tool dies.

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I have a Presto actually it is the GRS 850. It is the same unit, but the GRS label made me pay too much for the tool. Any how the unit performs great. I have been using it for 5 or 6 years now without any maintenance. It does have enough torque to work metal, but its performance in soft gummy metals like copper is very slow. It actually works fairly well on steel. I don't use it much any more, but I would miss it if it was gone. I would recommend the Presto if your looking for a turbine with more torque.

Patrick

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:lol:;) I like to play! I like scraps too, they are the right size, so far, with what I have been doing.

 

Once, I sent a scrap from a piece of wood I had carved to the friend who had sent his scrap to me for use. I wanted an ID of it, and asked that he return it to me. He was astounded! The piece that I wanted returned was about 3/4" x 1/4'. It did get carved eventually and became this. And, someone purchased it! What a hoot!

 

I have no idea what to do with metal damascus scraps, but I am sure there are enough of yous guys to push me in a variety of directions!

 

Janel

 

I wonder, do you use the scraps for anything?

 

Janel,

 

I have pieces of damascus that date back to the early 90's, and I've used it for several things. While most prefer to call it scrap, I usually call it "leftovers". Most of my damascus for knives comes in flat billets and I have saw the knife out of it. There's always something left. I label it for future use and set it aside. Most of the time the leftover pieces are at best only good for a small fitting on a knife or a clip or cap top on a pen. Sometimes I get lucky and the leftover will make some sort of blade. I just have to look into them to see what's in there! The two pictures show blades made from leftover damascus. The small one is a bird and trout sized knife with a 2 1/4" blade of stainless damascus. The longer one is my Persian Stiletto, whose blade was a leftover of carbon steel/meteorite damascus from a large knife project. I had it sitting around for 6 or 7 years and made several sketches, all based on a long slim and curved stiletto. Finally got around to making it last year. I've also made a few jewelry pieces from damascus (and mokume gane).

 

I'm sure you can think of places to use patterned steel or mokume. Maybe certain body parts on your insects like wings or eyes.

 

The tiny spoon and bowl are neat!

 

David

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post-322-1202928357.jpg

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Thanks Lee for the explanation about the various tools. The blowing feature sounds quite useful!

 

Insect wings? Be still my heart! It sounds like fun!

 

Janel

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Well folks looks I am going to be buying another tool - hopefully my last!

Thank everyone for all the great information!

Debbie

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Well folks looks I am going to be buying another tool - hopefully my last!

Thank everyone for all the great information!

Debbie

I think I am going to have an attack of some kind, your last tool oh no you can't have to many tools :) Help I am a tool addict

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Guest Clive

A word of warning.. while power tools are extremely useful, relying on them as ones primarly carving means WILL retard ones ability to manufacture hand tools.. not to mention developing the tecnical skills to use such tools that are so critical to developing a unique and personal carving language.

 

Such limitations are reflected stylistically. To the experienced eye such work becomes a bit like looking at paintings painted using colours straight out of the tube.. theres a certain sameness about it... a lack of the personal and the intimate.... very difficult to put into words but very real none the less... in short it effects QUALITY. It seems almost politically incorrect to mention the Q word these days and I hope that I don't come across as being needlessly critical since I feel this is such an important issue that I hope is taken seriously... it always saddens me tremendously that so many aspiring carvers are so seduced by power tools that their true potential is never realized.

 

Regards

Clive

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Hello All,

 

I think Clive is absolutely right on here - I feel you cannot connect to the work as directly through a handpiece as you can when you are using a carving tool the "feel" just isn't there - also what Clive says about making your own tools is Very Important. I think power tools can help rough things out though without causing problems.

Thanks, Clive.

By the way, your work that I've seen is inspirational - I'd love to see it in person - any thing of yours in public exhibit on the West oast of U.S.?

 

Magnus

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Guest Clive

Thank you Magnus, thats kind of you to say. I do have some west coast collectors and they do loan work to exhibition. I'll find out if anythings out and about at the mo.

 

Regards

Clive

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Aloha 

     I am currently looking at a used NSK z500 online, and just wanted to ask for any ones opinion on using a used NSK unit.  It is listed at $500, which I beleive is a good deal after reading thru these threads.  

    Is there a lot of maintanence and repairs with these units?  I have some experience, though I am still on the begining of my carving journey, so I dont expect the machine to last forever, just as an introduction to these sort of high quality micro motors.

 

 

Let me know what you guys think

 

Mahalo

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I have two NSK micrometers.  They are different from one another, though at the moment I do not have their descriptions at hand.  The first was purchased new, the other used, purchased from another carver met through this forum.  They both work well.  I set them up to use different sized collets for the two main tool bit diameters.  A time saver, mainly.  One has a manual speed dial, the other is foot pedal speed controlled.  

The original machine I used for heavy waste removal.  It has held up well.  The other unit uses finer bits.  That said, for the majority of days and hours I spent carving any piece, one day was for roughing in a piece, the rest of the time was done with files and knives/scrapers.  I never perfected finish work by rotary tool, preferring the careful development of detail that only hand tools can produce.

I noticed recently that the original unit's hand-piece on-off button has deteriorated, having become not like its original self.  I am not sure what the next step for that little thing will be, but the tool itself works beautifully.

Janel

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Thanks for your response.  Ive heard great things about the NSK machines, and met a    amazing Maori bone Carver who used one.  I have also been researching and started using some gravers when completing the fine details in my carvings.

     Lots to learn ahead, but I was hoping upgrading to a micro motor would help me begin to manifest some of my more detailed carving ideas that I have.  I will continue to watch to see what is available used online.

Appreciate you sharing your experience with these machines.  For the used machine, is it still possible to send it in to get fixed, even if you were not the initial one who purchased it?

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I apologize but I do not know how to answer that question.  It would be good to be able to do so.  Lets hope that they do not need fixing!

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