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It is Summer! (in the northern hemisphere)


Janel

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I do have a piece on the carving bench, but I have not carved on it since May 17. This spring and early summer has been filled with so many other things, doing for other people mostly, and my own involvement with the fellowship activities. Very soon the balance will change as I get caught up with so much that was set aside, in piles, waiting for me to return home. I totally missed spring here, all of a sudden it is summer, and past the summer solstice. :blink:

 

What is anyone carving these days? Or, are you busy with summer things and family, the garden, shows, or just watching the water rippling?

 

Janel

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I haven't carved anything in a while. But I'm getting the bug again so who knows. Summer time means grass cutting for me. I have my Mom's grass, my mother-in-law's grass, my karate studio and my own house to take care of. I spent several hours today running a string trimmer, at least two hours yesterday doing the same and mowing.

 

I may try a different wood that grows locally. It looks like willow, except that it isn't the weeping willow. I carved a "spirit face" in a piece I picked up on the beaver dam near my house. It carves easily, holds detail well and finishes nicely.

Sorry I'm so long winded tonight.

 

 

Don

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Hi Janel,

 

I'm in the drawing stage of an ebony/boxwood carving. . . . I've been looking at a carving I started last year and set aside. It is asking me to pick it up again. But the spring was long and wet, and I have fencing to do, a locust tree that fell up against a shed needs to come down, more garden to plant and then there's my day job and the custom work and oh my goodness but life is wonderfilled!

Blessings,

Magnus

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Hi Janel,

 

I have been very busy over the last several months learning to speak, read and write French. This is actually a full-time (8 hrs a day) program that will last about a year.

 

In my spare time, what little there is of it, I have been designing and creating a large polychrome sculpture of the coat of arms of the Canadian Nurse's Association, which by the time it is done, will also take about a year.

 

Unfortunately, I haven't had much time for any lengthy posts, but I keep tuned in on a regular basis.

 

Phil

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Hi Phil,

 

It is nice to see you here. Your French language study sounds like a serious occupation. Do you have an intended use for it once you have completed the program? I hope that all goes well with both of your activities. Any photos yet?

 

Janel

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Hi Janel,

 

Since Canada is officially bilingual, it is necessary, by law, that all federal employees at a certain level be able to speak both French and English. The higher up you go, the higher the level of ability required. In certain cases, like mine, the government actually removes you from your job and places you in the training program full-time. All sculpture projects that I had in progress are on hold until I return in October.

 

I always thought that if they wanted to make me a better sculptor that perhaps Italian should be my second language, but they didn't see it that way. Fortunately, living in Ottawa, which is on the border with Québec, there is plenty of opportunity for me to use my French.

 

RE the coat of arms, I would love to show off some photos, but I promised the organization that I would keep the design secret until it is officially finished and unvieled next year. I have been taking photos every step of the way, from the original rough sketch to the formal design, to the rough block, to the blocking out stage (where I am now). Eventually I should be able to do a really good presentation, but unfortunately it will have to wait until next winter.

 

Phil

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ello Janel,

 

I've been working on a line of Nephrite jade bracelets. I got the idea a couple of years ago and have been working it up since. Now I have some time to develop it. Mostly these are geared towards men. I've worn one since the idea arose. Nephrite is the toughest of gem materials, a sort of mineral felt so it wears very well. The drilled blanks are Wyoming "black" (really dark green) and BC Canadian from the Cassiar mine. The bracelets are Wyo black with Siberian green rod inlaid through, Cassiar (with bubbles), another, darker, Cassiar with center ridge, and Yukon with spots. I will also utilize jades from Siberia for bracelet bodies.

 

Right now I'm a bit stuck as to finish details i.e. adding metal and other gems. I am a rock guy and could be satisfied with these as they are but the public likes "precious" metals and "real" gems to justify the price these will fetch.

 

Hope the pics are sufficient, just stepped outside the door and snapped 'em.

 

Tom

 

What is anyone carving these days? Or, are you busy with summer things and family, the garden, shows, or just watching the water rippling?

 

Janel

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I've been working on a wrought iron bokuto (Japanese physician's "sword" - although they've always seemed more like a mace to me). 9 inches long, forged, engraved and carved from a piece of 1 1/2 inch diameter ancient wrought iron anchor chain found locally, possibly from the middle 1800s. Has a ways to go yet. My shoulder still aches from about three hours of forging it down to approximate size and shape. Learned a lot about the special techniques needed for forging wrought iron (really yellow hot, stopping before orange heat is reached), and how to weld shut the various oops-es from forging past orange. Trying to leave as much of the surface texture from the very slaggy "exudate" of the silica inclusions, and carving it back in where I have to remove it for the detailing.

 

It's based upon similar netsuke of rotten gourds that were common to the netsuke "wasp carvers" of old Japan. I don't know if the Japanese actually made bokuto from iron or other metals, but I am. Anyway, that's my story and I'm sticking to it...

 

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:( Tom, I am a fan of bokuto and have enjoyed your story, imagining you whamming the daylights out of that old iron. Thanks for sharing. Is it complete yet? How do you keep it still while carving it?

 

Don, Tom and Greg, It is great to see the new projects! What a diverse group of folks, challenging themselves with each piece!

 

Janel

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Janel,

Sorry it has taken me a while to get back to you on that 'one piece of wood' I have a pile of wonderful, beautiful, glorius, rare wood as you know but, that one piece that just clammers to be something greater has not bitten me yet. There is a nice looking piece of that boxwood that I want to try what you did and see how I do - I'll let you know and I might even get brave enough to show pictures - what ya think?

Regards,

Debbie

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Hi Debbie,

Sometimes it takes a while for the next "one" to reach out and get itself started. I'd say, if it is challenging, go for it! See what you can do. Like what the Goethe quote says, "What you can do, or dream you can, begin it; Boldness has genius, power and magic in it." It gets me going when I am on the cusp, or in need of a push.

 

Janel

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Such Great stuff everyone is working on, I am thrilled to see them in progress.

Here is a piece I have been working on for at leadt a year but is in the home stretch. A Hawaiian Tiki called Lono, he is about 36 inches tall ans is from Florida Mahogany. I hope you like him.

LonoEdit1.jpg (41.8K)

LonoEdit1.jpg (41.8K)

LonoEdit1.jpg (41.8K)

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Almost complete. Waiting for inspiration for color, and a trip to the city to purchase new materials for coloring.

 

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I began this piece right after the Minnesota Potter's Tour and Sale. I went retro and made pots for a week. The little cup is from that week. The frog and the broken cup are a signal to me to stop working in the past and return to carving wood. Sort of. I like throwing pots, but not the rest of it anymore. I had not made pots for eight years, but seemed to have no trouble starting up where I left off. The contribution to sales and family was necessary and significant. Now back to the wood!

 

Janel

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Hi Leon,

 

Thanks! The eyes are just made of amber. I'll see about a photo of the eyes. I will try to make the camera on the bench my trigger for remembering that shot for you.

 

Happy full moon everyone!

 

Janel

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