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Hair


Janel

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As I work on the hair of my little human figure, I wonder if anyone in this group has carved hair, whether for a human or an animal. When I have looked at the many styles sculptors have used to create hair, I see endless variations. I am moved to wonder if there are lessons to be learned from those more experienced with carving hair.

 

I encourage our 111 registered members to take another step and begin to ask questions, offering their own experiences here! I am so eager to learn about what you all know! This encouragement is for any topic or idea related to carving in the small scale, show us your/our vast pool of knowledge!

 

For the subject of hair, how does one plan the flow and movement before carving. What steps are taken to get to the part where the hair is completed? Do you have favorite tools for different effects? The questions could become even more specific, but I invite you to show us what you know, in written words and if you have photos or drawings to illustrate the process and results, please add them.

 

Warmest regards,

 

Janel

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post-10-1116011616.jpg

this is a detail shot from a figure measuring 4 feet by the carver Duane Pasco www.duanepasco.com -click on recent works, and then sculptures. I think this piece is stunning in its gracefulness. The hair is a strong element in the whole piece.

In carvings which I like, I've noticed that often the hair is carved in two stages. Early on in the carving, massing and movement of hair is delineated. A head of hair will maybe have 5-6 masses of clumps of hair. Once this is carved and polished (necessary in order to get good, sharp detail) then one uses a v-gouge, engravers burin, or even a scribe, to mark the individual strands. I guess what I'm saying is to maybe think of the hair as a mass or volume like any other element of the figure rather than something light and airy.

 

hair's tough. next discussion...clothing and drapery :P

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One of my favorite pieces at the BMFA is an Egyptian woman statue. She is wearing a shear like cloth dress except....... its really just a big piece of black stone.... Some day I hope to go back and sit, stare and study this fantastic piece. Really Amazing.

 

 

FOUND IT! too cool!

 

Now you really have to see it in person to get the full effect but here's the link

 

King Menkaure and Queen Menkaure

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Rats, my browser crashed while I was writing here! Here is the redo:

 

Thanks Doug for the link to Duane Pasco's work. He does remarkable work. I hear what you are saying, and see it as well, about carving the masses before the suggestion of hair. I've done that a little, but I did not finish the surface prior to carving the strands. I might be sorry when it it polishing time.

 

Thanks Rik for the link to the Menkaure sculpture. The reference to clothing appears to the viewer some time later as an intriguing surprise.

 

I like this way of gently educating myself, through the links you members add to your posts. The internet is an amazing resource! Thanks to all.

 

My brain is beginning to work again. I may just find "the way" to the carving bench and hope that my hands and eyes are ready for the challenge. I think that I am pushing past the energy level of the following picture from earlier in the week:

 

rainday_w.jpg

"She stares past her feet, through the cold rain, in the direction of the studio, and goes no further..."

 

This morning the sun is finally shining, which will help a great deal!

 

Janel

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  • 2 months later...

Hey all;

New member here. I work small scale in bone and antler. When it comes to hair, the pieces I like the best were the ones where to some extent I let the material dictate what happened. For example, a slice taken from the base of an antler will have a wild and wavy edge to it, as well as being nice and solid to carve. If I place a figure in the centre portion, I can work the hair out to the natural edges in some interesting ways. I also tend to block the hair in bands or swathes before roughing out the layers, and add details later. I'm going to try polishing before detailing next, a tip from a previous post to this thread.

This technique works nicely for female face portraits, but is also useful for animals (horses, unicorns, wolves) and water images (dolphins, mermaids) where the edges become the slpash of spray...

Wish I had the technology to post some pictures.

Thanks for the inspiring posts!

Lana Klassen

Bonewalk

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Hi Lana! Thanks for joining the membership and offering your experiences!

 

Is there some way I could help you get to the point where you could post pictures, or are you lacking the digital camera or scans from slides? I can't help with acquiring a camera, but if you have the digital information there are a number of us who could help you take the next step. We like pictures!

 

Janel

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  • 6 months later...

Hairs how I coif carvings:

post-2-1141436535.jpg

 

1.Realistic: done with small palm veiners,small chisels & knives. Head detail of "Women with Bare Feet" after John Rood. Basswood (6.5x6.5x2.5 inches) carved in 1982

 

2. Natural wood texture: carved the hair line around the head & let the wood grain represent the hair. Head detail of Driftwood Mermaid (9x3x1.5 inches) Driftwood collected and carved in Oceanside CA in 1969 while serving as a hospital Corpman with the 27th Marines.

 

3. Stylized: treid to show locks as forms affected by water currents. Walnut (2x1.5x0.75 inches) and shell shard. Carved in the 1980's

 

4. Non existent: The Colonel is looking for a hand carved toupee and an introduction to a mermaid. I have given him neither. He was carved from a piece of ammunition create (3.5x1x0.75 inches) in 'Nam in 1970 while serving with the 5th Marines.

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