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Got a few things finished, and a pendant I made awhile back photographed. Pendant is the only really "carved" thing, but I thought you guys might like to see the metalwork too.

 

Pendant in Reconsituted Jet, copper bail. I've been drawing these odd little starfish for years. Figured it was about time to carve one. Pendant is about an inch tall.

post-1843-1216896291.jpg

 

Pic of the back to show the wrap-around.

post-1843-1216896419.jpg

 

This is a chunk of brass I was given that is some kind of high copper alloy. It was REALLY hard when I got it, and the annealing I did raised a lot of copper to the surface, hence the colors that the patina showed up. This is cut out with a jeweler's saw, hand hammer textured, curved to shape and hammered hard with a nylon mallet, then filed smooth on the edges. After that came sanding and patina, them more sanding. It's a decorative comb. About 3 or 4 inches long.

 

post-1843-1216896658.jpg

 

This one is solid copper, etched and patinaed. A nice little barrette.

 

post-1843-1216896736.jpg

 

Got several other things working on the bench, but I thought I'd show what I have finished.

LJ

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Very nice texture on that copper hair pin, how did copper come to the surface with just annealing?

 

Sam.

 

 

Maybe I should have said that the brass/bronze was VERY hard, as it was an engraving template plate.

It took 4 tries to anneal it with Oxy/Acetylene, and I didn't bother to flux it.

 

I'm not really even sure what the alloy was to begin with, just that it was some kind of brass or bronze. It was one of two template plates that were sent to my dad for putting a logo on. They sent an extra, and it was a good thing they did, as mistakes do happen. After getting the logo transfered to the plate, it was sent in, the logo was cut deeply in, and the plate sent back to him so that it could be a template for an engraving machine. He had a customer who wanted to be able to have him engrave their logo on several knife blades. They were willing to pay to have the template made. When it was finished, he gave me the plate with the mistake, and it's been sitting in my shop doing nothing due to being so damned hard.

 

Hope this answers your question.

LJ

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Maybe I should have said that the brass/bronze was VERY hard, as it was an engraving template plate.

It took 4 tries to anneal it with Oxy/Acetylene, and I didn't bother to flux it.

 

I'm not really even sure what the alloy was to begin with, just that it was some kind of brass or bronze. It was one of two template plates that were sent to my dad for putting a logo on. They sent an extra, and it was a good thing they did, as mistakes do happen. After getting the logo transfered to the plate, it was sent in, the logo was cut deeply in, and the plate sent back to him so that it could be a template for an engraving machine. He had a customer who wanted to be able to have him engrave their logo on several knife blades. They were willing to pay to have the template made. When it was finished, he gave me the plate with the mistake, and it's been sitting in my shop doing nothing due to being so damned hard.

 

Hope this answers your question.

LJ

 

I have read that some copper alloys, like aluminum copper, can be worked and tempered to a hardness thats comparable to steel. Wouldn't it be easier to just pop the whole piece into a kiln and set the temp to 700c or something like that then let it cool down real slow?

 

Sam.

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I have read that some copper alloys, like aluminum copper, can be worked and tempered to a hardness thats comparable to steel. Wouldn't it be easier to just pop the whole piece into a kiln and set the temp to 700c or something like that then let it cool down real slow?

 

Sam.

 

 

I don't currently have my ceramics kiln set up. But if you can figure out how to do this as a biological process, let me know.

 

It's also a good idea to know what alloy you're dealing with before you go putting a finished piece in a kiln at random temps. Not knowing is a good way to have it puddle, and have wasted the time you spent on it.

LJ

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LJ

Your work is very interesting. I like the flow of all of the pieces.

I am a huge fan of using coffee beans as a background for your photos. They offer a great contrast to the metal.

 

 

Thanks. I'm really glad you like my work.

 

And thanks for the input about the beans. Someone just spent their time trying to tell me that plain grey would look better. Been there, left asap.

 

I'd be interested to ask what sort of feeling the images evoke for you? What kind of mood do the photos seem to have?

 

Thanks,

LJ

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