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New Netsuke/Other Work


fkvesic

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Two netsuke in progress: basket in sycamore

 

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Peach in eucalyptus:

 

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And two pieces of old fabric work: Circles - tapestry work:

 

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Tree - knotted and padded work. The work is skewed because it hasn't yet been blocked out on a frame. Not a good photo or true colours because the flash bounced off the silk and I don't know enough about the new digi.cam. to adjust for lighting:

 

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Bonjour tout le monde, hi all the people. Can you tell the dimensions of your work. For the basket it's not necessary, i suppose that your peach has a same dimension, but the two others works, i have not idea. Have you try to carve boxwood ? Thank you to share your work, you have many talents.

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The basket is 1 3/4" in diameter and will be about 1" in depth when complete. The peach is big: 2 1/8" in diameter and 1 1/16" in depth: the grain on the eucalyptus is very splintery, so making it smaller would have risked bits chipping off. The circles fabric is 6 1/2" x 9 1/4"; trees is 11" x 11".

 

I've not yet worked in boxwood, though I have some. It's probably better to save it until I've achieved some level of skill.

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Thank you, Jim and Janel. I will try boxwood once I've finished these pieces, particularly as the eucalyptus is driving me insane! Still, I suppose finding my way round a difficult piece of wood is a good learning experience - I'm having to take nothing for granted from the outset.

 

Glad you like the circle, Jim; the photo of the other one is a disgrace. I'll probably give it another go once I've found out what this camera can do.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The basket carving has now become a pumpkin as I didn't feel confident about completing the original design:

 

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And a photo of my workspace, which has to be packed away at the end of carving time as I work on my ordinary desk and we haven't any more workshop space. I've two large office cardboard boxes under my desk that hold all the tools and woods, so it's all handy anyway. The bread board is ideal for carving as the shavings and dust collect in the rim - mostly:

 

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Thanks for the peek at your work space and the progress on that piece of wood! Seeing the red-handled tools, I recall you mentioning, or someone, that they were a bit too big for small carving. See what I have done to mine on this older photo of me at my carving bench:

 

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This adaptation makes them more useful, and wrapping tape around the metal also helps, though sometimes it needs to be redone.

 

Janel

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Thank you for the photo, Janel. It's always interesting to see how other people have adapted or made tools. I'm guessing you must have small hands, too.

 

It was me moaning on about the Ramelsons and I'm gradually coming round to the idea of whittling the handles down, though my husband is tutting at the idea - mainly because he'll be taking up wood carving after Christmas (he says) and has already been eyeing my tools and woods! Not that he stands a chance!

 

I've just received the piano wire I was on about - various gauges, posted by a friend, so I'll be looking for some dowelling this w/end. I could do with some tiny knives and scrapers, angled ones, too. Btw, thank you for your tips about pin punches; the tools I've made so far I use all the time. In fact, if I wasn't so keen on the carving, I'd be quite happy making the micro tools.

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Hubby should have his own tools. Sharing is not possible if you are each involved with a carving and need the tools! That is my vote. He may also need different ones, depending on the direction that he goes in.

 

I shaped the handles in a brutal way. I used a wood chisel and a hammer, with the old workbench top beneath. I whacked the lobes of the handles off, and then softened the angles a bit with more care, pushing against the front end of the carving peg. Nothing graceful or creative about it, but ended up with a bit of a taper and a comfortable feel.

 

Happy tool making! Let us know how it goes?

 

Janel

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My husband now says he wants to carve on a bigger scale, so the skirmish about tools is over.

 

I'll put up some pics of the tools when I make them and have now aquired a mini anvil from a jeweller friend. It looks like forging will be a new skill, too. There's a saying in Scotland which seems to be applying to me at present - 'as happy as a pig in shite.' :)

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Adapting Ramelson

 

 

Thought I'd follow on with this...Could be moved to tools section if you want....

 

Here is another way of adapting chisels....

 

The Ramelson type are easy to adapt. simply knock of the handle and use some dowel, around 8 inch long, you can always cut it back to find the balance you like..simply drill a small pilot hole and then larger hole to suit the chisel you are going to put in ,,, not too big though...it needs to be a snug fit, leave a little room for some glue... but not tight as you can easily split the dowel .........push the chisel in and gently tap to aquire the right fit...then pull back out and use Aroldite/epoxy to fit in...all done ...just been to the workshop and done this one it took me 10 minutes....

 

Some other tools Ive adapted are the flexcut...you can buy these as just blades...no handle on.... not saying there the best but for the price and a small piece of dowel your away....you do have to cut the end of the chisel away from the body on these ......

 

pics...the larger one is the Ramelson chisel and the other two on the outside are flexcut....I've put a couple of pics how I hold this type of chisel...this Is the comfiest way for me, I saw a friend using this technique and found it a little bit alien at first but now it's second nature......

 

sorry about photos not in right order..a little rusty..!!!!

 

good luck.........Have fun........................ Russell......

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Russ, many thanks for the photos and descriptions of tool making. There are so many good ideas on this board.

 

I seem to hold my tools in two ways; like a pencil if I want a delicate cut and in a palm grip if I want extra push. I find the pin-punch length of handle about right for both positions.

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