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Andesite Guardian


Donn Salt

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post-97-1117578241.jpgHi all,

In response to Don's query about stone working tools attached are images of the primary tools used for forming this recent commission which is shown in the latter stages of completion.

 

Although somewhat larger than netsuke the principle remains the same for hard media, remove the outer material to reveal the inner essence.

 

The 5" angle grinder has a water feed through the head and can accomodate a variety of diamond, or other relevant grinding attachments.

 

A quarter inch, air driven die grinder with a small variety of shaped burrs bring out the finer details.

 

Hours of hand finishing using diminishing grades of diamond pads, silicon carbide slip sticks and papers impart a life glow to the sculpture.

 

Cheers,

Donn

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Sorry Jim,

The second image is a closer view of the angle grinder showing the shape and structure of the diamond grinding disc.

 

For some reason the "Attachments Global Space Left: 28.07k" is not reverting back to the full capacity for follow up images.

 

Had intended to post a couple of jade pics more of a netsuke size but the program remains at 28:07k so will try again in a day or so.

 

Maybe I'm stuffing up at this end??? :)

 

 

 

Donn

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Guest DFogg

Don,

 

Sorry for the problem posting pictures. The forum quotas are set high enough so this shouldn't be a problem, but you are not the only one who has run into this. I am trying to find out what the glitch is and fix it.

 

One solution that does work is to upload your photos to an online photo site, I use Flickr.com and then post them here using the IMG tag.

 

I would love to see a close up of tha gnarly side grinder. I love your work. Thanks,

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Thanks Guys,

So this glitch with posting of photos is a known problem it seems............

 

 

The material of the sculpture is andesite. Not particlarly hard as far as the loose term 'hard stone' is concerned, about 5 on the Mohs scale, approximately the same as average knife steel. Steel cold chisels make hard work with this material and tungsten carbide is so brittle it chips and breaks. Grinding is the most efficient means of removing material.

 

Will do a little playing tonight and set up a sort of tool page on the web. Let you know how it goes. Should be more comprehensive and easily viewable.

 

Ahhh......... the projects that entertain us.

 

 

Donn

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A brief reminder to keep the file size about 50K, that might help. The recommendation for this site is 640 x 480 with file size around 50 K. Your image is smaller, but the K is higher and could be reduced some without affecting the web quality.

 

I look forward to more stsory telling with your pictures! What do you use for safety with these tools. If the work is wet, do you need a face mask for filtering the air? Do you wear eye protection?

 

Janel

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Thanks Janel,

Was aware the file was somewhat over the 50k. however the 28k left leaves little to play with and seems to be not resetting itself for further posts.

I believe Don is looking into it.

These few pics triggered starting a tool and works section on my site. It will probably be accessable by direct url for the moment and not linked from the site while I sort it out. Will advise you of the url address when there is something to see.

 

Sculpting these larger pieces is definately wet.... no dust as such, so air contamination is minimal....protective clothing consists of marine wet weather gear and marine gumboots, looks like I'm preparing for a storm...... and the minimal eye protection needed proves sufficient with the spectacles these mature eyes require for close focus.

 

Also AAA safety earmuffs which have had small headphone speakers inserted and wired up to the stereo!

 

Andesite is extremely messy to work with this way, strickly an outdoors, summer activity or in an environment able to be hosed down on completion of the project.

The rewards of observing being observed by the revealed entity far outweigh the minor discomforts.

 

Donn

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I like your last sentence! Do you inlay eyes into all of the carvings?

 

There is a special quality to a piece when it begins to have a life of its own, and when the eyes begin to "see", a different regard to the company we keep with each other ensues.

 

I'll let Don figure out the attachment quirks with the IPB guy. Sorry that it is happening.

 

Janel

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Not all but certainly most of these do have inlaid eyes, usually of highly polished, dark to black jade.

 

Except for the few with whom I have been placing experimental inserts of deep cut crystal, laminated on the underside with various materials to intrigue the observer with 'eyes that follow'.

Creating an interactive 'passive' sculpture

 

An increasingly active development stimulated by the techniques related by netsuke master, Masatoshi, whose book I was fortunate in obtaining back in the early '80s.

 

 

Donn

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