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Hello all - new member in Texas


Debbie K

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Hello All:

 

I have been carving a number of years, mostly small-scale pieces. I started out carving tongua nuts, moved to wood, and now am back carving tongua nuts, boar tusk, bone and stone.

 

post-1996-1233585497.jpg

 

I tried to attach a photo and if it works, the description of this piece is as follows:

“Minnow”, 2008

6” wide by 6.5” high by 4.5” deep

Pendant: Upper body: hand carved boar tusk with oil painted eyes and lips.

Lower body: hand carved air-fall tuff (volcanic rock).

Hair, belt, tail and bail: 14k yellow gold with rubies and citrines.

Stand/sea fan: Sterling silver with sapphires.

Base: Plexiglass, aventurine with glass beads, coral and river rock.

 

I also do metal work; chasing and repousse, fabrication and casting.

 

When I first started carving tongua nuts, I tried using ink in my undercuts to accentuate details, but as the nuts have a lot of oil in them, they repel the ink. I used oil paints mixed with Windsor and Newton’s Liquin to achieve the look I wanted.

 

I have recently found and started reading your forum and found some of the discussions about ink. Since I am now carving bone and tusk, I realized that I could probably start using some of these inks.

 

I am primarily interested in knowing what ink is commercially available, where and what colors they have. I only use burnt umber, alizarin crimson, yellow ochre, ultramarine blue and rarely black. Any recommendations or advice would be greatly appreciated. I read how some of you are making your own ink, and I’m not sure that I want to go that far unless it’s really simple.

 

I’m glad to have found you guys, I enjoy looking at the pictures and seeing what other folks are doing. You have many very talented and gifted members.

 

Debbie

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Hello Debbie,

 

Welcome to The Carving Path forum! The above piece is quite a complex piece. You must know how to work with so many different materials. I have not heard of using air-fall tuff (volcanic rock) before. Is it much like stone for working?

 

Thanks for joining us here!

 

Janel

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Janel:

 

It is a stone and has a hardness of approximately 6. I found it a little harder than obsidian that I've worked with before but not as hard as quartz. This particular stone is more like basalt than lava; there are no voids or air bubbles inside of it. It is capable of being given a high gloss shine, but in this case I preferred to stop at this luster. I liked the silky look and feel of the stone. This stone was very good to carve, no hidden fractures and opaque enough that you don't have to worry about it cracking.

 

Debbie

 

Hello Debbie,

 

Welcome to The Carving Path forum! The above piece is quite a complex piece. You must know how to work with so many different materials. I have not heard of using air-fall tuff (volcanic rock) before. Is it much like stone for working?

 

Thanks for joining us here!

 

Janel

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