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dragonflies agn


pennabilli

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a few years ago, I shot a resting dragonfly with a fly on its tail.

In september last year we went to bathe on the river Marecchia (I live in the river's valley) and chanced upon the complete mating process of dragonflies.

You see the male flying over the female, taking hold of her neck with the tip of the tail (two or three pronged), the female raises her tail to reach the male's abdomen where the eggs will be fecundated.

Without wasting time the female started laying eggs on underwater stalks.

ps. snails too have a strange way of mating.

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Amazing luck with being at the right place at the right time, and great closup photos! Thanks!

 

Janel

Fact is I never go out without carrying my camera. I own a fuji finepix s 9500 costing about 350$, before I had a Nikon cololpix with wich I learned digital photography, I learned a lot of tricks to overcome the camera's limitations.

Prior to digital cameras I used canon reflexes with very good results, but after using a digital camera I quit using film cameras, apart from the price of film & print, digicams offer you better light adjusting and usually have very sharp lenses (Coolpix's lens was fantastic for sharpness -see the attachment- but with a small lens diameter poor lighting conditions could not be handled without flash), can be used with one only hand (sometimes with the other I hold the subject).

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one more thing: the mating dragonflies are really damsels, more delicate than dragonflies. Damsels resting keep their wings vertical back to back, while dragonflies keep them open horizontally; that way you distinguish also moths -wings spread horizontally- from butterflies - vertical wings.

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Guest Clive Hallam
one more thing: the mating dragonflies are really damsels, more delicate than dragonflies. Damsels resting keep their wings vertical back to back, while dragonflies keep them open horizontally; that way you distinguish also moths -wings spread horizontally- from butterflies - vertical wings.

 

Hello pennabilli,

 

Nice pics.. you are quite right regarding the relative wing positions of dragonflies and damselflies but that isn't always the case with the order lepidoptera.. the so called moths and butterflies. There is in fact no valid taxonomic distinction between the two groups in that order... although there is a lot of debate concerning the issue. The bottom-line however is that there are in fact numerous species that are classified in families commonly regarded as moths that look like butterflies as there are likewise butterflies that look like moths.

 

Examples might include the family of skipper "butterflies" which often hold their wings slight open and the Brimstone "moths" which often hold their wings slightly closed.. pics below of skippers and the brimstone moths. :blink:

 

Another general guide is to examine the antenna's shape.. butterflies usually having a club shape as opposed to the moths fan like shape but there are exceptions to that as well. It can be quite confusing. I suppose we'll just have to wait until DNA studies provides us with definitive answers to these classification questions.

 

 

 

Regards

Clive

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