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hello from plymouth


maciver

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I’m an art student at pcad who has developed an interest in carving and its different aspects I’ve had some experience with wood carving (pine and hazel) which I kind of figured out as there’s no one at the collage with any knowledge on the subject I’ve already found this site really useful ;) and I was wondering if you have any advice for a complete novice, what materials would be a good starting base what tool would be worth getting ect I’m interested at looking at diffrent materials and techniques

 

Thanks

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Hello maciver!

 

Welcome to The Carving Path forum!

 

The often recommended approach to answering your questions is to learn to use the SEARCH function at the top, right, area of the forum pages. Use good keywords, or refine the search with More Search Options. There are now four+ years of thoughtful communication about the tools that the members use, and the SEARCH results are varied and interesting to read. There is also an area pointing out some accumulated information in the Getting Started and Resources forum area.

 

Were is Plymouth and PCAD? We have an MCAD in Minneapolis, MN.

 

Welcome and enjoy learning! You have come to a friendly place and a good place to find answers to your questions.

 

Janel

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pcad is plymouth collage of art and design in plymouth uk it has lecturers in most crafts and fieldeds except carving ;) and the only work thats done with woodcrafts is making frames, so im already consided an odity in my basic carvings i've been having a go at

thanks for advice :) i will spend as much time as i can spare reading the forums.

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There's surprisingly little carving taught in the UK educational system, maciver, except by way of sculpting courses, and certainly nothing in miniature carving. Chichester CAD is the nearest to you, I think, where sculpting is taught; you might be able to make helpful contacts/friends there, perhaps.

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Hey, wait a minute!

 

The UK has Chris Pye, who is a teacher of carving. Click here to go to his web site. Click here to read about one-on-one tutoring with Chris. He teaches in the USA periodically, but is from the UK. His site is loaded with information, and is very organized. The carving is standard sized, not so much smaller as we aim for here on the forum, but in essence we just use smaller tools and hold the tools a bit differently because they and the carving materials are much smaller.

 

Just remember to return to The Carving Path for what we have to offer when you need to come up for air!

 

Keep on the trail to learning and growing,

 

Janel

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Hi Maciver..........

 

Might be a good idea to contact the .....THE BRITISH WOODCARVERS ASSOCIATION...

 

They have regions all around the country....link below...may be one close to you

 

http://www.bwa-woodcarving.fsnet.co.uk/

 

The chairman of the BWA is Peter Benson who has his own teaching school for carvers....you can find his email link on the BWA site above....

 

Peter has taught me for a number of years, he's based in Essex, may be a little far to travel but would be worth every penny, he really is superb......

 

Janel mentioned Chris Pye, I've met Chris on a number of occasions at various shows around the country and know one or two carvers who have been to him for tuition, again a superb carver and teacher.....

 

Good luck................

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Hello maciver, and welcome to the forum,

 

I would suggest that you start with Chris Pye's book "Woodcarving, tools materials and equipment". It is one of the better contemporary books for basic getting started information, and covers all technical bases. Also, Hasluck's "Manual of Traditional Woodcarving", Dover Publications, is an excellent source for technical information and is not very expensive. Both should be available from abebooks.com

 

Best regards,

 

Phil

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maciver,

 

I'm a big fan of public librarys as well as the Internet to review all the styles of carving. Our library system in the U.S.A. has a free service called "Interlibrary Loan". I've been able to find virtually any book ever printed and check it out via Interlibrary Loan. Fill out a form at the library, wait a week or two and then they let you have it for 2-3 weeks. There is no charge for the service at our City/County library.

 

http://www.worldcat.org

 

Personally I like carving with chisels as it's inexpensive and doesn't make a ton of dust.

 

John

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