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Engraved Kiridashi (Knife)


tsterling

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Another knife I just finished. This one is (very!) loosely based on the Japanese kiridashi style knife (basically a general purpose/utility sort of blade). I "Americanized" it by using a standard Western-style double edge bevel rather than the traditional Japanese single side chisel bevel.

 

It's 1095 carbon steel with copper scales and three steel pins, 2 1/4 inch blade, 7 inches overall length.

 

Thanks for looking!

post-11-1236720137.jpg

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Another knife I just finished. This one is (very!) loosely based on the Japanese kiridashi style knife (basically a general purpose/utility sort of blade). I "Americanized" it by using a standard Western-style double edge bevel rather than the traditional Japanese single side chisel bevel.

 

It's 1095 carbon steel with copper scales and three steel pins, 2 1/4 inch blade, 7 inches overall length.

 

Thanks for looking!

post-11-1236720137.jpg

 

YES! I can Definitely see this in my hand at my bench. This knife would make anyone's carvings much nicer. Well done.

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Hi Tom,

 

Aggressive insects chosen for this knife that looks like a tool for stealthy aggression. The elegance of the wasp hides its painful defense ability, and the intent of the mantis being stealthy and quick to attack when ready. This knife is like these insects in both their beauty and their abilities. (Okay, so the knife is not for use with aggression... )

 

Your work continues to grow. I am enjoying seeing what you are doing! Thank you for sharing the new work.

 

Janel

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Thanks for the encouragement, folks! Always good to get a little positive reinforcement...

 

Really cool Tom! Are the insects carved down from the top?

Very well done critters.

 

Jim

 

Hi Jim,

 

Not sure what you mean, but the scales were pinned and epoxied on, surfaces shaped and smoothed, and then the bugs carved down into the copper, so the top (curved) surface of the copper scales and the highest points on the bugs are at the (once-upon-a-time) surface of the scales. Hope that's what you asked!?

 

My stash of gravers and associated tools is slowly expanding, and I cobbled up several scrapers I used for the first time on this knife. They're strictly my design, since I've seen very few scrapers that are used for work of this scale. They seemed to work OK, with a little chattering. Fortunately, the surface texturing (another cobbled up tool) took care of most of that...

 

Do you have any decent images of some of your scrapers? If so, maybe a new thread on them?

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Not sure what you mean, but the scales were pinned and epoxied on, surfaces shaped and smoothed, and then the bugs carved down into the copper, so the top (curved) surface of the copper scales and the highest points on the bugs are at the (once-upon-a-time) surface of the scales. Hope that's what you asked!?

 

My stash of gravers and associated tools is slowly expanding, and I cobbled up several scrapers I used for the first time on this knife. They're strictly my design, since I've seen very few scrapers that are used for work of this scale. They seemed to work OK, with a little chattering. Fortunately, the surface texturing (another cobbled up tool) took care of most of that...

 

Do you have any decent images of some of your scrapers? If so, maybe a new thread on them?

 

That's exactly what I wondered. Very nice.

 

As to the scrapers, it looks like you have them under control. I find them indispensible. I have one that I use for 85% of my scraping, another that I use for 13% and a couple of oddments for the other 3%. In lieu of a tutorial which will have to wait for another time, you could look at the main one Here which is made from a half onglette graver with a flat side and has a palm handle.

 

Jim

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Tom,

 

Is there any sorts of treatments that would prevent copper from changing color? My guess is no, unless you spray or coat it with something, which is impermanent at best. Just wondering.

 

Janel

 

Hi Janel,

 

I don't know of anything that will keep copper from aging into some other color. Coverings like lacquer get chipped and worn, which then leads to localized color change, in my opinion even worse than the whole piece changing at the same rate.

 

Plain, unpatinated copper is either going to go to a dark brown color (in a relatively controlled indoor environment) or green (in extreme environments) like a Canadian government building roof. I usually provide a darker brown patination since that's the direction it's going to go anyway, so there's not a big surprise for my client. Then I just give it a coat of Renaissance Wax.

 

Like my netsuke in the past, I like to think that the creation of my work doesn't stop with me, so wear and aging provides the client an opportunity to continue with the creative process. Most of my favorite "famous" antique netsuke are very worn, with that grime and crud surface treatment we like to call "patina" and which collectors pay large sums for. I like the idea that my work in the distant future will have that same grime and crud finish!

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