Jump to content

work benches


Ron Scupham

Recommended Posts

Hey Janel! :blush:

You said on a previous post about starting a work bench show and tell section and you mentioned another site that did (GANOKSIN).

I think that it is a great idea! So I will start it off by submitting mine!

I designed and built this with with the emphasis on bone carving as well as scrimshaw, silver-smithing, gem-setting and jewellery making.

It has an inbuilt dust and fume extraction unit that I designed and built from scratch as I couldn't afford a commercial one. It has all the tool holders and racks as well as a slide out solder-work station with over head fume extraction, and various slide out open front trays for the odd ball tools and supplies. Down the right-hand side is a series of draws for my supplies, precious metals, findings, gemstones, spares etc... ;)

 

 

 

 

My shop

 

post-1873-1238627528.jpg

post-1873-1238627512.jpg

post-1873-1238627487.jpg

post-1873-1238627591.jpg

post-1873-1238627783.jpg

post-1873-1238627634.jpg

post-1873-1238627578.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for restarting this idea! I've been thinking about it lately. Now where is my magnifying glass? You could post photos that are 640 x 480 pixel dimension at 72 dpi, and about 50 k file size. Then we could see what you are showing us. I am intrigued by how compact the set up is.

 

Janel

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry about that but I was using a image resizer program and must have done them twice. :blush:

Are these any better? ;)

 

 

 

 

 

post-1873-1238661164.jpg

My Work Bench. The pyramid object on the right is a rotating ziggaraught that holds all my Burrs & polishing mops

 

 

post-1873-1238661264.jpg

Main work area with leather sand bag used for holding work-piece. The very top slide-out shelf is the soldering station.

 

 

post-1873-1238660970.jpg

This shows the vacuum dust shroud behind the sand bag and the shelf under the soldering station which has all my soldering tools and supplies.

 

 

post-1873-1238660356.jpg

Shelf under solder station.

 

 

post-1873-1238660525.jpg

Solder station.

 

 

post-1873-1238660814.jpg

Tool racks.

 

 

post-1873-1238660844.jpg

Rotating pliers rack. The desk lamp to the right also double as the fume extractor for the solder station.

 

 

post-1873-1238661307.jpg

Rotating Ziggeraught for all my burrs etc...

 

 

post-1873-1238660873.jpg

Draws for all my materials, supplies and spares.

 

 

post-1873-1238660935.jpg

Vacuum dust extraction system.

 

 

post-1873-1238661022.jpg

Fully adjustable arm rest's.

 

 

post-1873-1238661093.jpg

There you have it!

 

 

 

 

 

PS.

 

Have moved to a new abode since these were taken and some adjustments were made to the bench as well as the studio itself!

 

Cheers

RB :blink:

post-1873-1238660907.jpg

post-1873-1238661065.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Hello RB 52 and other TCP members,

 

On my Burr Carousel is a section of pin holes useful only for nano sized burrs. I developed a simple "bridge" that would allow the space to be used for bigger burrs. Thought that others might be interested and used the TCP search to find the proper thread for my entry.

 

RB 52's entry came up and his "Rotating Ziggeraught" caught my full interest. To have control over hole size and, equally important , distance between holes is a great advantage. If you have a moment, could you explain rotating mechanism you used? I am planning to build my own "Ziggeraught"

 

For my bridge I used a 2x1/2x1/2 inch plastic. I used high molecular weight plastic that I bought from Woodcraft; however, wood or plexiglass will do the trick. I measured the linear distance between the second pin hole on each side. Marked that on the bottom of the bridge. For pins I used 1/2" brads with their heads nipped off. Using a hand drill I "drilled" holes for the pins in the bottom of the bridge. If I remember correctly I used a #54 drill; however, the pin itself can be used as a drill. On the top side I drilled four 1/8" holes about 3/8" deep. I think I had some luck because the pins hold the bridge firmly in place.

 

Hope my bridge and RB 52's "Ziggeraught" are useful to others.

 

Have fun carving

 

E. George

post-152-1241920790.jpg

post-152-1241920808.jpg

post-152-1241920823.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
Hello RB 52 and other TCP members,

 

On my Burr Carousel is a section of pin holes useful only for nano sized burrs. I developed a simple "bridge" that would allow the space to be used for bigger burrs. Thought that others might be interested and used the TCP search to find the proper thread for my entry.

 

RB 52's entry came up and his "Rotating Ziggeraught" caught my full interest. To have control over hole size and, equally important , distance between holes is a great advantage. If you have a moment, could you explain rotating mechanism you used? I am planning to build my own "Ziggeraught"

 

For my bridge I used a 2x1/2x1/2 inch plastic. I used high molecular weight plastic that I bought from Woodcraft; however, wood or plexiglass will do the trick. I measured the linear distance between the second pin hole on each side. Marked that on the bottom of the bridge. For pins I used 1/2" brads with their heads nipped off. Using a hand drill I "drilled" holes for the pins in the bottom of the bridge. If I remember correctly I used a #54 drill; however, the pin itself can be used as a drill. On the top side I drilled four 1/8" holes about 3/8" deep. I think I had some luck because the pins hold the bridge firmly in place.

 

Hope my bridge and RB 52's "Ziggeraught" are useful to others.

 

Have fun carving

 

E. George

 

 

Hi ya George!

Basically the timber is 40mmx20mm pine cut at 45degree's then the edge is planed down at 30 deg. You have to work out the length of the pieces so that when assembled they sit on top of each other and just touching the planed edges of each piece. The good thing about this design is when it gets too crowded with burrs you can attach another level. The bearing underneath is a lazy susan bearing you know the thing some people have in the middle of their dinning table that allows you to access different dishes by revolving.

I think I got the design of some site on the internet but that was years ago.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi RB_52

 

I'm interested in your 'dust extraction system'. Where did you get it?

 

 

:)

This system I made myself. Its basically a bag less vacume cleaner , left the EPA filters in, mounted in a esky ( chiller box) with a large computer fan to extract excess heat. The reason for the esky is that it is resonably quiet in the studio. In turn there is a cyclone mounted in the line ( you can get these as an accessory at a vacume cleaner retail outlet) to filter all the particulates. There is a "T" piece with a valve mounted in the line which is then connected to the over head light, the one in black with the large shade, so that when I'm s/soldering the fumes can be dissapated. I have also put in a foot switch for hands free operation. There is a shroud that I can remove or add depending what I'm doing at the time. I basically only use this when I'm doing some really heavy machine carving as most pendant machine tend to flick material in your face, and I only do this to remove most of the dross, Most of my work is done by hand tools, see my shop :- www.etsy.com/shop.php?user_id=5673697

:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...
Sorry about that but I was using a image resizer program and must have done them twice. :ph34r:

Are these any better? :huh:

 

 

 

 

 

post-1873-1238661164.jpg

My Work Bench. The pyramid object on the right is a rotating ziggaraught that holds all my Burrs & polishing mops

 

 

post-1873-1238661264.jpg

Main work area with leather sand bag used for holding work-piece. The very top slide-out shelf is the soldering station.

 

 

post-1873-1238660970.jpg

This shows the vacuum dust shroud behind the sand bag and the shelf under the soldering station which has all my soldering tools and supplies.

 

 

post-1873-1238660356.jpg

Shelf under solder station.

 

 

post-1873-1238660525.jpg

Solder station.

 

 

post-1873-1238660814.jpg

Tool racks.

 

 

post-1873-1238660844.jpg

Rotating pliers rack. The desk lamp to the right also double as the fume extractor for the solder station.

 

 

post-1873-1238661307.jpg

Rotating Ziggeraught for all my burrs etc...

 

 

post-1873-1238660873.jpg

Draws for all my materials, supplies and spares.

 

 

post-1873-1238660935.jpg

Vacuum dust extraction system.

 

 

post-1873-1238661022.jpg

Fully adjustable arm rest's.

 

 

post-1873-1238661093.jpg

There you have it!

 

 

 

 

 

PS.

 

Have moved to a new abode since these were taken and some adjustments were made to the bench as well as the studio itself!

 

Cheers

RB :lol:

 

 

awsome!! set up...hopefully ill have a full size jewelrys workbench like you soon as a jeweler is retiring and if his price is right ill have it..

 

im so glad to see you think of safety concerns..many would think of it as to tiny of stuff to worry...no way..your a insperation to me.

i just put up a us buildings arch workshop thats 2,100 sqft ..=35'x60' and im in the process of building rooms inside and as its 18 feet tall ill add another 1,000 +/- more sqft on top the lower rooms..its been my dream for over 22 years that just came true in aug-09....and its all on my 8 acre tn mtn top i own...

 

q ? if you had to have a room for what your doing ,what size would you make it?

 

michele

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...

Hi Ron,

 

Thank you for the inspiration and explanation of your Ziggernaught. I don't recall seeing anyone else using a home made rotating burr holder.

 

I finally made a rotating burr holder; however, I think that aliens from outer space took control of my brain because my Ziggernaught morphed into a UFO. Actually the availability of scrap plywood and area in which the holder is used dictated size and shape.

 

My rotating holder provides better organization of burrs than does my commercial holder. My bottom row is spaced for buffing, sanding and polishing wheels.

 

In the future maybe I'll make another holder with holes slanting outward which would make picking up a burr easier. That is a feature on the Ziggernaught that is not on the UFO.

 

Have fun carving.

 

E George

 

Post Script (March 8, 2010) For anyone interested this is how I made my UFO:

 

1. With a compass I scribed the following diameter circles on 1/2" plywood and cut them out on a jig saw: 2.25",3.5",5", and 6.5". These sizes are based on a commercial burr holder; however, any diameters will work.

 

2. Cut out a 6.5" circle from 1/4" plywood. Draw a circle on this disk that is the same diameter of the holes in the lazy susan bearings ( I used a 4" bearing available from Woodcraft).

 

3. On each disk draw a circle about 1/2" less in diameter. This circle is were the holes for the burrs will be drilled.

 

5. On the center mark on each disk drill a 1/8" hole. At the end of the project, through these holes will go an 1/8" dowel that will center the layers.

 

5.. Drill the holes for the burrs through each layer at a diameter marked in instruction #3. The layer below will serve as the stop for the layer above and the 1/4" piece will serve as the stop for the bottom layer.

 

6. Assemble with glue using the 1/8" dowel in the center. Attach lazy susan bearing to the bottom with screws on the scribed circle on the bottom of the 1/4" disk.

 

post-152-1265860155.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...