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Entwined Leaf Duet


Guest katfen

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Hi Kathleen,

 

What an interesting piece - in Purple Heart, no less....

 

I like the nice fluid form. I'll bet you sanded it super smooth despite the open pores of the Purple Heart. I guess I say that because I'm always drawn to the color and feel of that wood but shy from it for tiny pieces because of the visual imact of the texture. If the piece is meant to be tactile rather that mostly visual, though....why not?

 

Did you intend for it to be worn as a bead or pendant - or something to finger secretly in a pocket ?

 

Christine :)

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Oh dear - I guess what I said last night about the texture could be interpreted as a negative comment. Not what I meant, surely. I guess my meaning was more to say that I haven't been so brave to use Purple Heart for a miniature (for my own silly reasons) and it's nice to see it used here so well.

 

I'm learning :)

 

Christine

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Guest ford hallam

Looks rude to me :o , but perhaps that`s just the way i look at things.

I imagine it was quite a job to refine such a small object made from a relatively open wood. Looks as though it was worth it though. and don`t mind Christine she`s just jealous..... :)

 

Just kiddin`, i thought the guy`s might enjoy a cat fight ( no pun intended ) so I was trying to stir things up a little, hey! it`s saturday night.

 

be careful out there everyone,

 

regards, ford :)

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Janel,

 

I know you`re out there in the big electric blue, just a quick question. When do i stop being a newbie and what do I have to do to get another little blue square under my avatar.

 

I could post lots of photo`s of ongoing work if you could organise a collection from the forum members to buy me a camera,....... you can`t blame a fella for trying.

 

Regards, Ford

 

Clive`s older, more sophisticated and charming brother,

who`s in a playful mood this evening. ( ford, not Clive )

 

I`ve got a little boy to tuck into bed and read stories to right now but i`ll be back.

Read the last bit in an Austrian accent. :)

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Jim,

 

What do i get for 2 groats and a turnip?

 

and I promise not to be silly any more on this thread that katfin started :)

 

hugs and kisses,

 

ford :)

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:D:):):o Ford,

 

I'll answer quick to keep the fee down.

 

Newbie is 0-9 posts.

Member is 10-29 posts

Advanced Member is 30 and above posts.

 

Each rank adds a little blue square! Get busy if you want more squares!

 

Our 14 year old son is off to camp for a week! We're going out to the nearest little burger place for a bite and refreshment.

 

I'll consider the camera, but don't hold your breath! We've all made the plunge plus the learning curve!

 

I'd like to meet you and see for myself!

 

Happy stories,

 

Janel

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I am sorry as well, Kathleen.

 

I've worked with purpleheart only once, and have more waiting for the right ideas to present themselves. The wood was a challenge, but pleasing at the same time.

 

While at a book store earlier this week, I browsed the publications for wood related activities. One caught my eye, a lesson showing variations with filling the pores of open woods prior to finishing which would yeild a smooth finished surface. The photo examples were of cabinetry or furniture, but gives me ideas for using open woods and adapting...

 

One method was, hope I am right here, a shake on powder (fine pumice dust) is rubbed and rubbed into the surface until the pores are all filled. The pumice also picks up some of the wood fibers while abrading the surface, so it becomes a little colored. I think then the surface is wiped clean, stained and finished in the usual fashion.

 

The second method was by using plaster mixed with less water than usual, rubbed into the surface of the wood until all pores are filled. Done in sections because the plaster dries fairly quickly. Wiped clean, stained and finished.

 

This is not to suggest filling the pores on the Entwined Leaves. Just a little related to pores in wood.

 

Are the leaves hollow? Did you put a finish on this piece? I'll bet it feels good in the hand!

 

Janel

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Guest Clive

Hi Kathleen,

 

I suspect that this is yet another example of photography doing small tactile work no favours at all. From what I can see... the piece looks very interesting, but I simply can't see it...Please don't take that in any way to be critique of your photography, rather a general comment on the limitation of such images. :)

 

Personally I think the use of deeply grained wood on very small sculture only works well when the grain is used as an integral element of the piece's narrative.

Could tell us more about your reasons for using that particular wood for this piece?

 

Another subject that might be worth exploring in this thread is consideration of grain direction. I am often struck the number of carvings where grain direction has been determined not by an aesthetic judgement but simply because thats how the wood was cut from the block bought from the supplier. Going back to your piece, Kathleen... it seems to me that a subject so intrinsically organic struggles to harmonise with the powerful axis created by such a strong horizontal grain. I feel that if the vertical axis of the design had been on more of a diagonal to the grain, that the woods character would have supported the overall design better.

 

Regards

Clive

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Kathleen-

You took on a relatively complex form for such a difficult wood, and did well. Clive is right about the pores/grain direction. I've noticed that on forms which are generally circular in composition (as your is), both the carving and the visual impact of the grain present problems. It's much easier with linear shaped subjects- bean pods, reclining animals, snakes, etc, isn't it?

 

I made some game pieces for my brother for Christmas this year out of various woods, which I shellacked and polished. The purpleheart piece took many more coats of shellack and sanding to fill the pores than the others. Mahogany can be like this too.

 

Finally, re: celtic knotwork... Aren't those entwined figures just asking to be carved? We're so used to seeing knotwork patterns and anthropomorphised animals in 2-D and shallow relief, but I bet that artistic legacy started in three dimensional form...anyone want to comment?

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Thank you, as well, for the above comments! I like to read about what you are thinking.

 

I am curious about what sort of tools you have for hollowing the leaves. With each new piece, there seems to be a new need for yet another tool to reach in, around, behind and back again around a corner. Sometimes, I'll pick up and drop tools in rapid succession until I realize my tools aren't going to "cut it". Sometimes the imagination is limited by the tools!

 

Do start a Celtic Interlace topic in the Techniques forum. I think that would be as good a place as any. If someone else has a Celtic Interlace piece or one in progress and would like to share images that would be great.

 

(My engagement ring is a Celtic Interlace gold band with an oval, pot-bellied ruby. We've a fondness for that decorative style.)

 

Looking forward to seeing what is next for you! Big or small?

 

Janel

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Kathleen,

I wanted to comment on your piece. Hope it's not too late. I love the "rude" aspect of the sculpture intwined with the celtic knots. I saw an exhibit of 10c Irish brooches many years ago and have been hooked ever since. What is the wood? I love the color. I wonder what the "sisters" would think. Watch out for that ruler.

Dick

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Kathleen,

 

"which I can't describe in words...they'd have to be demonstrated." Boy, I know what you mean! The same goes for trying to make the sounds of birds for someone else, you just have to be there. I like the way you described the tools. Brain is working now... thanks for the descriptions.

 

Janel

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