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katakiri bori Peony


Jim Kelso

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I feel like I've been playing catch-up ever since I returned from Japan in December. I've been busy making things, but haven't had the time to photograph them, but now getting around to that.

 

Here is a pendant in two alloys of shibuichi (soldered) with 18k gold frame.

 

The peony design was engraved using katakiri-bori. The flower itself may actually be considered more of kebori (line engraving) technique and was cut using the Lindsay AirGraver. The leaves were all cut using a chisel and hammer.

post-4-1243001689.jpg

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Thanks Tom!

 

Believe it or not, the lines are not darkened. They look so because of the photo lighting. It's very frustrating photographing katakiri -bori as the real beauty of it is only revealed as you turn it in your hand and see the light playing across the various planes defined by the engraving cuts. It's quite lively in the hand. You can see reflective light hitting some of the wider cuts in the photo.

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Thanks Tom!

 

Believe it or not, the lines are not darkened. They look so because of the photo lighting. It's very frustrating photographing katakiri -bori as the real beauty of it is only revealed as you turn it in your hand and see the light playing across the various planes defined by the engraving cuts. It's quite lively in the hand. You can see reflective light hitting some of the wider cuts in the photo.

 

Aha! Of course, that brings up another question. I've been watching several discussions on the engraving forum about polished gravers to get that shiny cut that reflects light and looks black at one angle and shiny at another. How polished/smooth are the gravers you used for this? And, now that I think about it and have you on the hook, how do you sharpen your Lindsay gravers?

 

Thanks!

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Aha! Of course, that brings up another question. I've been watching several discussions on the engraving forum about polished gravers to get that shiny cut that reflects light and looks black at one angle and shiny at another. How polished/smooth are the gravers you used for this? And, now that I think about it and have you on the hook, how do you sharpen your Lindsay gravers?

 

Thanks!

 

You had to ask :rolleyes: . Just kidding. What seems like a simple enough question leads naturally enough into an elaboration on my somewhat unorthodox sharpening method. Some may find it useful or at least interesting. Rather than bury the info in this thread, I'm going to start another thread that will tie a number of things together. Quickly though, I finish my gravers to the 800-1000 range. I don't find a mirror finish appealing. After engraving, the piece is polished with 800 grit silicon carbide and the horsehair brush (migaki-bake) Obviously, even at this finish, the light reflecting from these cuts changes the look rather dramatically even though it's not a mirror finish.

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You had to ask :rolleyes: . Just kidding. What seems like a simple enough question leads naturally enough into an elaboration on my somewhat unorthodox sharpening method. Some may find it useful or at least interesting. Rather than bury the info in this thread, I'm going to start another thread that will tie a number of things together. Quickly though, I finish my gravers to the 800-1000 range. I don't find a mirror finish appealing. After engraving, the piece is polished with 800 grit silicon carbide and the horsehair brush (migaki-bake) Obviously, even at this finish, the light reflecting from these cuts changes the look rather dramatically even though it's not a mirror finish.

 

Thanks, Jim. I look forward to your sharpening thread!

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I feel like I've been playing catch-up ever since I returned from Japan in December. I've been busy making things, but haven't had the time to photograph them, but now getting around to that.

 

Here is a pendant in two alloys of shibuichi (soldered) with 18k gold frame.

 

The peony design was engraved using katakiri-bori. The flower itself may actually be considered more of kebori (line engraving) technique and was cut using the Lindsay AirGraver. The leaves were all cut using a chisel and hammer.

post-4-1243001689.jpg

 

 

Beatiful Jim .İt is sumptuously subtle .

I want to ask you if there are any Japanese tool companies that sell all these special tools(brushes etc.) that they are used in japanese metal work or other crafts that you can place an order online ????

 

Thank you

 

Arman

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"The design was inspired by a Peony(herbaceous variety "Exquisite") in our garden "

 

I've an old, red double peony with a slight perfume, cuttings of which have followed me from London to Scotland. Unfortunately, it doesn't do too well in my garden; it's a bit too cold up here, so I'd love to see photos of yours.

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Jim,

 

A very lovely and sensitive piece. Thank you for sharing it with us. Can you explain your choice to change from powered graver to more traditional hammer and kiribori tagane?

 

Best,

Fred

 

Thanks very much Fred.

 

I engraved the flower blossom and leaves in two distinct types of cuts, using two different chisels, to draw a contrast between those elements as they are quite different in form, texture and line. The blossom is engraved in light, flowing strokes, emulating the flower in the photo which can be seen to be very light and graceful. I wanted the leaves, by contrast, to be more textural and variegated as in the garden plant. The leaves were engraved using cuts, made with a flat chisel, that vary from narrow to wide in the classic katakiri-bori mode, with some hammer blows visible, simulating ink brush painting strokes. In the case of these Peony leaves, the outline of the leaves was drawn on the metal, but the chisel cuts themselves were largely impromptu, again in contrast to the more carefully planned blossom.

 

The choice of the two tools being power driven and hammer driven is; 1) for the flower, I chose the Lindsay AirGraver handpiece with the Lindsay grind graver because it offers both comfort, control and unexcelled results when cutting very tight curves, such as in the stamens and end of petals. I used this tool for the rest of the flower(not leaves) simply because it was in my hand. Largely a matter of what I'm used to in this context.

 

2) To get the effect I wanted in the leaves, I couldn't have done better than use the hammer and chisel. I've used a flat chisel in the AirGraver to do similar work, but it is so smooth that you loose the hammer-blow effect and there is nothing more satisfying than hammer and chisel.

 

There is always more than one way to skin a Peony, and I am loathe to suggest that my way is the best for anyone but myself. To me, it's results that count, and I think using the tool that you're most at ease with will translate to the best possible work. Comfort with this tool or that can vary depending on many factors.

 

Thanks again Fred.

 

Jim

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Beatiful Jim .İt is sumptuously subtle .

I want to ask you if there are any Japanese tool companies that sell all these special tools(brushes etc.) that they are used in japanese metal work or other crafts that you can place an order online ????

 

Thank you

 

Arman

 

Arman, my apologies! I had meant to reply earlier, but wanted to check some sources first and then I forgot! So sorry.

I can send you a brush while I explore other sources.

 

Jim

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