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The Making of Te Kahurangi


Billy

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Hello Billy,

I enjoyed very much to see the process of your carving, the beautyful piece itself and the way you photographed your work!

How do you put the eyes? With glue or is there any other way for this?

Thank you for sharing...

Dorothea

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This piece is actually a female. Traditionally tiki figures were carved to represent ancestors so only carved one side. I see no reason why a carving couldn't be done both sides. But I like to follow more traditional influences.

 

Thanks for your interest, Billy.

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Hello Billy,

 

Thank you for posting the many photos from your diary of the carving process. It is interesting to see the flow of work as it reaches completion. It is quite a large piece of bone. What kind of bone is it? In one photo I see the tip of one tool. Do you use more than one tool for carving?

 

Janel

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Hi Janel. Yes the bone is a from the jaw of a Sperm Whale. Strandings around New Zealand are reasonably frequent and after our Dept. of Conservation carry out some standard tests, the local Iwi (tribe) have the right to do what they want. Some bury the whale and declare the ground tapu (sacred) and some use the bones and ivory for ceremonial uses and carving.

 

The tool you see I think is one of my gravers. I have a number of gravers but have my favourite 3. I have a large file, several needle files and a selection of smaller files which are only a few inches long. Unfortunately I suffer from a touch of RSI, so I also rely on my handpiece for a number of tasks. 120, 320, 600, 800 grit sandpapers I use for finishing.

 

Thanks for the interest, Billy

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  • 1 year later...
Hi everybody. In response to Janel's request to see what we're upto, here's my latest piece Te Kahurangi.

 

I did a little photographic diary. I hope you enjoy.

 

Hi Billy,

Nicely done. I took a jade carving workshop from Donn Salt last October in California and learned the process, so now I carve POUNAMU. You can see my carvings at WOODSTONEANDBONE.com. and other things. Hepi Maxwells' fine jade work first caught my eye about 1980 in Pasadena, California at a museum exhibition. I carved netsuke for 25 years and finally took up jade last year after much deliberation. Now i am hooked on the stuff. Brad Blakely

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Hi Brad.

 

Thanks for your comments. I checked out your site, very nice. I know Donn, we chat every now and then. I too love the green stuff, but still love to get into a bit of bone and what not. I LOVE sperm whale's teeth when I can get hold of them, but pounamu is certainly growing on me.

 

More of my stuff can be seen at www.rongomau.co.nz (Gareth Barlow)

 

All the best, Billy.

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  • 1 month later...
Hi Brad.

 

Thanks for your comments. I checked out your site, very nice. I know Donn, we chat every now and then. I too love the green stuff, but still love to get into a bit of bone and what not. I LOVE sperm whale's teeth when I can get hold of them, but pounamu is certainly growing on me.

 

More of my stuff can be seen at www.rongomau.co.nz (Gareth Barlow)

 

All the best, Billy.

 

 

Hey,

 

Great to see the process! And great to see that such a precious material is treated with the respect it deserves.

I was wondering about your tools too, especially for the finer details.

Do you have any pics of how you manage to do the lines and smaller stripes so regularly, or any pics of working on a round surfade like a sperm whale tooth?

The latter mainly because that makes symmetry and straight lines so much more difficult than on a flat surface, or is that a false assumption?

 

By the way, that pounamu has certainly grown on you, as has the greywhacke. Wonderful pieces too!

 

Catcha later!

Cheers,

Hans

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Hey,

 

Great to see the process! And great to see that such a precious material is treated with the respect it deserves.

I was wondering about your tools too, especially for the finer details.

Do you have any pics of how you manage to do the lines and smaller stripes so regularly, or any pics of working on a round surfade like a sperm whale tooth?

The latter mainly because that makes symmetry and straight lines so much more difficult than on a flat surface, or is that a false assumption?

 

By the way, that pounamu has certainly grown on you, as has the greywhacke. Wonderful pieces too!

 

Catcha later!

Cheers,

Hans

 

Oh, thanks for explaining the backgrounds of your works, I'm still trying to reach a better understanding of cultural and historical context of Maori carving (still a lot to learn there! the names never stop, and my Maori language skills are rudimentary, so I mess them up easily).

What indicates that it's a female? The absence of clear male genitalia of exaggerated size, the context, or anything else?

Curious!

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