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Barry Lee Hands engraved Warren Osborne folding knife with blue canyon jasper


Barry Lee Hands

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Hi Barry,

 

That knife is very attractive all together. I am drawn to the engraving details, especially the little dots interspersed in the negative spaces. Are all of the engraved parts and stems inlaid first then engraved? The look of the leaves have a soft quality in these photos, which I admire.

 

When you described the knife as a - Barry Lee Hands engraved Warren Osborne folding knife with blue canyon jasper - what exactly is being attributed to yourself and to Warren Osborne? Are you responsible for everything except the blade and folding hardware?

 

Jasper is my favorite stone. I have only seen variations on red to maroon up here in Minnesota. The blue is amazing, and would be even more so when in the hand.

 

The blade pattern is quite amazing.

 

Thank you for sharing this with us!

 

Janel

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Are all of the engraved parts and stems inlaid first then engraved? The look of the leaves have a soft quality in these photos, which I admire.

 

When you described the knife as a - Barry Lee Hands engraved Warren Osborne folding knife with blue canyon jasper - what exactly is being attributed to yourself and to Warren Osborne? Are you responsible for everything except the blade and folding hardware?

Janel

 

Hi Janel, and thank you for the good questions.

The stems are raised inlays, the leaves are overlays which have been sculpted and shaded.

I learned this after visiting Japan and studying the damascene there, and adapting some of the techniques to what I was already doing in the style of Arabesque.

This is not damascene, as this is much thicker, but damascene is a big influence in this work.

The Knife is " Barry Lee Hands engraved" that being all the goldwork is by me.

" so and so engraved" is the way things are commonly written up in gun auctions, and I have fallen into the habit of using that descriptive grammar.

The Knife is made by Warren Osborne, who inlayed the Jasper, he is one of the best US knifemakers.

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Aloha Barry,

 

Good to see your work here. I've enjoyed your postings at Engraver's Forum. The gold work is great. Very reminiscent of Japanese chrysanthemums.

 

I was wondering, by damascene, are you talking about what is sometimes referred to as nunome zogan (cloth inlay)? And, is this an example of what Japanese call taka zogan (true raised inlay)? Like the elk inlay tutorial that is posted elsewhere. (It would be cool if you posted that here... hint. :o )

 

 

Karl

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Aloha Barry,

 

Good to see your work here. I've enjoyed your postings at Engraver's Forum. The gold work is great. Very reminiscent of Japanese chrysanthemums.

 

I was wondering, by damascene, are you talking about what is sometimes referred to as nunome zogan (cloth inlay)? And, is this an example of what Japanese call taka zogan (true raised inlay)? Like the elk inlay tutorial that is posted elsewhere. (It would be cool if you posted that here... hint. :o )

 

 

Karl

Thanks Karl,

I am not sure of the proper name for what I was shown how to do in Japan, as I was traveling with an interpreter, and cannot find my notes at the moment(they are at my accountants with all my reciepts).

My use of the term damascene is used to describe anything less than .004 inches thick applied without digging a hole first.

What I was shown in Japan was less than .001 in thick.

The attachment of the goldwork I learned in Japan was made as in nunome zogan, but was not allowed to show through, hence no cloth pattern, so I do not think that would be the correct japanese term because they have specific names for every variation of every thing.

After applying the gold, the iron was etched, the background black laquered, and the gold burnished clean with charcoal.

This work is similar to taka zogan, in that parts are true raised inlay, but this is only using yellow gold, and I think Taka zogan would usually have two or more colors of material.

The techniques I am actually using are a blend of many things I picked up in many places over the years, and I cannot blame them on the Japanese, as they are my own amalgamation.

Thank you.

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