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Bouquet folder


Jon Christensen

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This is my first post here. I have been lurking for a while and really enjoy this site. There is a wealth of information here.

I've been working on small carving projects for a while trying to learn. This is my first serious attempt at a real project.

The theme is a vase with a bouquet of leaves.

Comments are welcome.

Thanks for looking.

Jon

 

bouquetFolder.jpg

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Welcome to The Carving Path Jon! I am glad that you finally introduced yourself and added a photo. I am not a metals person, but what you have shown us looks to be a rather complicated first "real project". I had to look closely to see the leaves! Are they in the metal or are they surface carved? What a lot of work either way! Thank you for posting!

 

Janel

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Janel,

Guess I should say a little more about myself and the knife.

I am a Mastersmith with the American Bladesmith Society. I've been a knifemaker for 10 years.

This is my first serious attempt at incorporating carving into my work, something that I've been wanting to do for some time.

 

This is a sole authorship damascus folder.

 

After the carving was done I masked off the vase and etch the damascus to bring out the patterns I put into the damascus.

 

The handle scales are a course feather pattern damascus. The blade is leaf damascus.

The blade is 4", overall length is 8-3/4"

 

I hope that helps explain it better.

Thanks

Jon

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Thanks Russ and Don.

 

Janel,

Yes, the leaves are part of the steel. It is a mosaic damascus. The leaves when formed are about the size of your thumb in cross section and are around 18" long. These leaf bars are then cut into smaller 3" lengths and then placed in a metal can and powdered steel is placed around them. This can is then welded up and reduced in cross section. This endcut/cross section is the basis of the mosaic pattern. I then recombine the can by cutting it into smaller lengths and reduce it more. This goes on until I have reached the desired size for the leaves.

 

The feather pattern is made by hot cutting a billet of alternating steels. The hot cutting pulls the layers down and gives it the curves or archs of the feathers or in my case branches.

 

Both patterns are made from two different steels. When the pattern is done and the knife blade is polished it is then placed in an acid (I used ferric chloride). This eats away at the two steels at different rates and reveals the pattern I made. Any damascus pattern I make is in the steel regardless of whether it is acid atched or not. A leaf on one side of the knife can be traced to the other side of the knife.

 

Hopefully I didn't make it too confusing.

 

I'd be happy explain more if you or anyone else wants me to.

 

Jon

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