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chip carving materail


Stewart

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Welcome to The Carving Path, Stew!

 

I am not such a carver, but perhaps Basswood would be good for starters. It is a soft wood that will allow you to learn to use the tools and feel the grain of the wood.

 

There are wood working stores in metropolitan areas that should have such wood on hand. You would likely be able to order some by mail also. Use basswood carving or basswood blocks, and a number of suppliers will pop up for you to choose between. If you go to the stores, you will find books that will be helpful also.

 

Have you taken any classes on chip carving?

 

Janel

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  • 1 month later...

Hi Stewart,

 

Welcome to The Carving Path.

 

Basswood is, as Janel said, a good choice for chip carving. It is fine grained and soft. It is the wood that most European Carvers use. I have some blocks I bought at a local wood carving show and I enjoy carving it.

 

If you haven't already, Google Wayne Barton. Wayne is the master chip carver. He has a regular article in Chip Chats that is the National Wood Carvers Association magazine. Google Chip Chats if you want more info. He had an interesting article in the Sept/Oct (no 11) issue of the British magazine Wood Carving in which he shows how to chip carve a leaf motif. For some reason the local Borders here carries the British magazine.

 

I tried a little chip carving on a wooden spoon I bought at a thrift store. The wood was OK but my technic was SO-SO. The key is how you hold the knife.

 

Do spend some time exploring The Carving Path and show us a piece of your work.

 

Have fun carving,

 

E George

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  • 3 months later...

Linden, limewood are simlar woods to those already suggested. There is a variation depending on where the wood was grown. I prefer local- Scottish grown wood. Like all timber in varies . Getting the hang of sharpening the knife is as important.

Good luck

John A

Hi Stewart,

 

Welcome to The Carving Path.

 

Basswood is, as Janel said, a good choice for chip carving. It is fine grained and soft. It is the wood that most European Carvers use. I have some blocks I bought at a local wood carving show and I enjoy carving it.

 

If you haven't already, Google Wayne Barton. Wayne is the master chip carver. He has a regular article in Chip Chats that is the National Wood Carvers Association magazine. Google Chip Chats if you want more info. He had an interesting article in the Sept/Oct (no 11) issue of the British magazine Wood Carving in which he shows how to chip carve a leaf motif. For some reason the local Borders here carries the British magazine.

 

I tried a little chip carving on a wooden spoon I bought at a thrift store. The wood was OK but my technic was SO-SO. The key is how you hold the knife.

 

Do spend some time exploring The Carving Path and show us a piece of your work.

 

Have fun carving,

 

E George

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Hi Steward

 

Check with Taunton publishers to see if they still have Wayne Bartons DVD. It will give you the best start to chip carving and answer most of your starting questions.

I have the DVD and have found it excellent :P

 

I also have made my own Knives.

 

Enjoy and have fun,

 

Toothy

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  • 5 months later...

Basswood, lime, and linden are all the same type of wood. The different names are just local familiarities. Basswood is a great wood to work while chip carving, also butternut is great, and when finished looks similar to walnut (they are related, I believe). Basswood makes way for your knife better, but butternut makes a prettier finished product in my opinion. Depending on how deep you are carving, and how decent you are at sharpening your knife, you may wish to try cherry (it's hard, and a lot of people will tell to forget about it, but it looks amazing when finished, and takes detail very well).

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