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Bracket fungi


Guest Clive

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I decided to end my conversation with the fungi today.. here are some preliminary images as promised

 

post-2059-1258919434.jpg

 

post-2059-1258920666.jpg

 

post-2059-1258919461.jpg

 

Some of you will know that I've long held strong opinions against taking images of my carvings but my recent illness has mellowed me a tad... for better or for worse (?)

 

I'll post some more and better pics later... Edit: now added.

 

Kindest Regards

Clive

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Outstanding piece, Clive!!

 

I really love the subtle layers of shading and texture that you have worked into the surfaces. I am looking at this on my i-pod, which gives me a crystal clear image, about the actual size of your work. It is the next best thing to actually holding it in the hand, i suppose. I am amazed by the delicacy of the inlays, and the effect achieved. It looks as though the work simply grown, rather than carved. I can really appreciate what you have been saying about patinas.

 

A great big thumbs up!!

 

Phil

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Well actually.. some are growing through the fungus.. its a curious natural phenomena often seen with many fungus

 

I've made mine using cut sections of stained quill that go through tiny holes made in the inlays

 

Here's a couple of pics I googled

 

post-2059-1258988459.jpg

 

post-2059-1258988472.jpg..

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quills.

(palm slaps side of head smiley)

 

The grass growing through the fungus is an interesting thing though. We usually think of fungus as mysterious growths that pop up overnight and fade in a few days, but these shelf fungus are clearly old-men of the forest compared to the growth rates of grass.

 

Is it true that lichen growth is linear and serves as a good benchmark of time? Every 1/2inch diameter equals 10 years or something like that?

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Yes, inlays of course. But don't tell me you just pushed them in!

 

I have to admit, you're much more crazy as I thought! Off the scale!

 

Who convinced you to put the himotoshi in?

 

Well no of course not.. all inlays in organic materials do have to be glued in.. Amber eyes for instance.

 

I put the himotoshi in this piece as I don't believe a himotoshi could be successfully created later... that has always been my thinking regarding himotoshi.. I don't usually put them in as they don't need to be in.. if they can be added later. That is in fact precisely what a number of the great netsuke carvers of old did.

 

And as for being crazy...

 

"All men dream: but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, to make it possible. "

 

T. E. Lawrence, The Seven Pillars of Wisdom

 

:o

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Exquisite piece, Clive! Just how I like netsuke to be - deceptively simple, elegant, and a natural history subject that shows a little secret bit of the world people typically ignore.

 

Poetry frozen in time...Thanks, a privilege to see!

 

What was the stain or dye you used to color the fungus, and has the coral been dyed/stained as well?

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Many thanks for all your kind comments.

 

Tom.. I'm using a number of colouring agents.. KMnO4 + K2CrO4, Fabric dyes and procion dyes.. in strong alkaline and acidic solutions.. I have also changed and enhanced the Umimatsu with various processes some involving bleaching with H2O2.

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Is it true that lichen growth is linear and serves as a good benchmark of time? Every 1/2inch diameter equals 10 years or something like that?

 

"Lichenometry is a technique used to determine the age of exposed rock surfaces based on the size of lichen thalli. Introduced by Beschel in the 1950s,[16] the technique has found many applications." .. Wiki quote

 

Thank you Sergio

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Many thanks for all your kind comments.

 

Tom.. I'm using a number of colouring agents.. KMnO4 + K2CrO4, Fabric dyes and procion dyes.. in strong alkaline and acidic solutions.. I have also changed and enhanced the Umimatsu with various processes some involving bleaching with H2O2.

 

Thanks, Clive. Bleaching the coral sounds interesting....

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