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Elk antler


Natasha

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Recently I've bought Northern Elk antler, it is greyish, not so nise as I prefer.

I carved Ryusa netsuke, I wondered what details and how small could be carved. So, Elk antler was carved easier than mammoth, polishing was done faster and after bleaching the surface became shining without any lacquers or another things for shining. Well, this piece is ready for staining with Yashabushi! :blush:

There is another kind of Elk antler, Southern, they can be gathered around Moscow. It has light ivory color!

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A word here.

Ye olde English worde "elk" actually changed its original meaning. At least in American. What is called elk in American is a native American species, also called Wapiti. It's a kind of overgrown red deer. The antlers are larger, but inside they are the same spongy, unuseable kind. What Natasha means by elk would be called "moose in American. The Northern Elk of Russia (and Scandinavia) is closely related to the Moose of Northern America. (Don't know, maybe they are the same species even.)

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Hi Natasha,

 

Thank you for posting the new carving! I look forward to seeing the transformation after the yashabushi.

 

Bleaching antler may have been discussed before on the forum. I will still ask. What did you use to bleach the antler, and how did you apply the bleaching agent to the antler. Any cautions for such open and complex surfaces that might be good to know about?

 

Janel

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I just put in another quick word, out of turn, but justified, as I'm flying later today, and will be out of touch for a while.

Hydrogen peroxide is what I used for many years now, that of bleached blonde fame. My way it comes in 3 or 6% solution. Obviously, the latter works quicker. I wrap the antler (or bone) in synthetic cotton wool, soak it with a bit of peroxide, and wrap the lot in clingfilm. (this latter is simply to stop too quick evaporating.) Leave it for a few hours, maybe a day if it's cold and the staining is heavy. In warm weather it works quicker.

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Hello dear Janel! I used Hydrogen peroxide 30% and Ammonium hydrate 10%. For safe using I have two syringes, the first for Hydrogen peroxide and the second for Ammonium hydrate. I put this netsuke into glass cup then to cover it with Hydrogen peroxid using syringe, then with Ammonium hydrate. The bleaching process took about 2-3 hours (we had +26 Celsius degrees in the room). I just soac the surface of this piece some times (3 or 4 times), not too much, the netsuke didn't drift into solution! :blush:

There was no problem with tiny details, no crack.

Yes, Yuri, your way is also right! :)

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  • 2 months later...
Hi Friends!

Elk is Alces alces in Latin, yes, Yuri, You are absolutely right! The diameter of netsuke is 2 inches.

Thank You, Don! :)

WOW great work Natasha I have a long road of learning to travel ahead of me , regarding your antler, here in Canada what is shown in this picture would be called a ' moose paddle' from a moose . http://www.cwf-fcf.org/assets/images/engli...anner/moose.jpg elk here look much different although both are huge animals - elk - http://www.smouse.force9.co.uk/fa_elk.jpg . - Gary

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  • 4 months later...

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