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Strange Stone Insert


Colin

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Greetings from Whakatane New Zealand. I have found an anomily within a piece of Argillite that I want to carve.I use argillite pebbles, and use a

4" grinder with tile cutter blade to make my blanks. I had made my blank, and was starting to grind with a diamond wheel on a flexy shaft, when I noticed what I initially thought was a sandstone pebble within my blank.On further checking I noticed that it 'glinted' so polished it to check. I found an oval piece of metal which I cannot perceive how it got into this stone.

Please check the following photos and if you can ,tell me what you think it and the metal is....Thanks Colin

 

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Colin:

 

Very strange. Is it possible that it is hematite? The thing that argues against this is the seemingly perfect round shape of the metal. If it were hematite, for example a crystal, the sides would have some angles. Is the host rock volcanic? Maybe there was a hole or bubble in it that was filled in with iron or hematite at a latter date.

 

I go to my local rock club tomorrow, and sometimes (often) there is a man there who works for the museum of natural science. I will ask him to look at this if he's there and get back to you.

 

In any event, what a very special piece this is, and how exciting to find it!

 

Debbie K

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Colin:

 

Very strange. Is it possible that it is hematite? The thing that argues against this is the seemingly perfect round shape of the metal. If it were hematite, for example a crystal, the sides would have some angles. Is the host rock volcanic? Maybe there was a hole or bubble in it that was filled in with iron or hematite at a latter date.

 

I go to my local rock club tomorrow, and sometimes (often) there is a man there who works for the museum of natural science. I will ask him to look at this if he's there and get back to you.

 

In any event, what a very special piece this is, and how exciting to find it!

 

Debbie K

 

 

It could be a pyrite ball they are often found in fossils beds

 

Marcel

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Very strange. Is it possible that it is hematite?

I go to my local rock club tomorrow, and sometimes (often) there is a man there who works for the museum of natural science. I will ask him to look at this if he's there and get back to you.

 

In any event, what a very special piece this is, and how exciting to find it!

 

Debbie K

 

Thank you Debbie K, Our town is fairly small and we don't have rock clubs or such , so I would certainly appreciate your asking. I said that the appearance was "grity", but reaching way back into my past as an electric motor winder/repair person, we used to fit bushes(bearings) that were "sintered". They had a similar appearance, though a different colour naturally. Exciting YES. Hope it doesn't turn me into a Green Giant or something...Cheers Colin

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It could be a pyrite ball they are often found in fossils beds

 

Marcel

 

Hi Marcel, I once had a piece of pyrite that I picked up in Broken Hill Australia, but that seemed solid and smooth, whereas this piece is "grity' or "sintered". I tried the Internet to see if there was a naturally formed sintered meal, but came up with a blank. We shall keep searching....Cheers Colin

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This is quite fascinating. I have a couple of questions:

 

I wonder if the rough edge is the crystalline structure of the material. Can you magnify that edge and see if there is a pattern to it or specific numbers of faces or shapes to the rough edge?

 

Within the circle of the metallic area on the last photo, is some of that area the stone and some the other substance?

 

Wikipedia: An argillite (pronounced /ˈɑrdʒɨlaɪt/) is a fine-grained sedimentary rock composed predominantly of indurated clay particles. Argillites are basically lithified muds and oozes. They contain variable amounts of silt-sized particles. The argillites grade into shale when the fissile layering typical of shale is developed. Another name for poorly lithified argillites is mudstone. These rocks, although variable in composition, are typically high in aluminium and silica with variable alkali and alkaline earth cations. The term pelitic or pelite is often applied to these sediments and rocks. Metamorphism of argillites produces slate, phyllite, and pelitic schist.

 

Could the inclusion be aluminium (aluminum)?

 

Janel

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This is quite fascinating. I have a couple of questions:

 

I wonder if the rough edge is the crystalline structure of the material. Can you magnify that edge and see if there is a pattern to it or specific numbers of faces or shapes to the rough edge?

 

Within the circle of the metallic area on the last photo, is some of that area the stone and some the other substance?

 

 

 

Hello Janel, Yes a facinating whatever. I have included a small area from one of my original scanned photos that I didn't originally forward. It is from the

"front " polished side. From the photo the dark left 1/3rd is the Argillite stone. As we can see the edge is rather 'sandy' rather than crystalline. I used the word 'sintered' as if it is made up from small granuals rather than a crystal shape. Though when moved around in the sunlight it does seem to refract

spackley colours. The odd colours within the disk are from my polishing. I presume that as I polished with my flexy shaft machine at a fairly high speed

(~ 8-10,000 rpm) I melted the small granuals with the heat which formed a flattened shiny surface. The grainy parrallel stripes are from my diamond wheel I was using (80grit) before discovering this anomoly. Could it be Aluminium-I don't know. We are in a volcanic area,with an active volcano on an Island 30 miles offshore. Plus qite a few earthquakes to keep us on our toes. Argillite is one of NZ's common base stones I believe, and I find it on local beaches as pebbles. Thank you for your interest, I hope someone can come up with a solution.....Cheers Colin

 

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Colin:

 

I had my friend look at this and he said it was "most likely pyrite, a relatively common occurence". Well, I don't know about common, it's never happened to me.

 

In any event, what a serendipitous event. I hope you keep this hook for yourself, I think it's special.

 

Debbie K

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:

 

I had my friend look at this and he said it was "most likely pyrite, a relatively common occurence". Well, I don't know about common, it's never happened to me.

 

In any event, what a serendipitous event. I hope you keep this hook for yourself, I think it's special.

 

Debbie K

 

Thank you Debbie for checking this out for me. Though I had wished for a more "mysterious" conclusion, I had really come to the same result through further searching on the Net. Never mind. It however has created a minor problem as I now check my cuts constantly when doing work, and is slowing me down some-what. :-). The hook blank and stone will definitly be kept in my special bucket.....Cheers Colin

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