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Boxwood resource


Janel

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I received a telephone call from William Jewell of Historical Woods. http://www.historicalwoods.com/

 

He is acquiring freshly cut boxwood logs (next week is the cutting) up to 8 inches in diameter. He took one log, resawed it and found it to be clear with occasional knots and no staining.

 

He has not had or offered such wood for sale before, but is interested in getting the word out to those who use boxwood. I do not know what price he will be offering the wood for, though I know that he is interested in selling the wood. He asked that I 'get the word out' about the boxwood.

 

It is fresh wood, not dried or seasoned. It was planted in 1840. The location is historic with the civil war period, as a formal planting of two 40 foot circles near a house.

 

His plan for when the wood is cut and delivered, is to paint the ends and place the logs in his barn, out of the elements.

 

I noticed that William Jewel joined the forum today. Perhaps he will add more information about the boxwood, and might also be able to answer your questions.

 

Janel

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Hi Janel,

Thank you for the post. I'll post another message once I get the boxwood in hand and sealed. I'll know more about the quality and quantity soon.

Bill

 

I received a telephone call from William Jewell of Historical Woods. http://www.historicalwoods.com/

 

He is acquiring freshly cut boxwood logs (next week is the cutting) up to 8 inches in diameter. He took one log, resawed it and found it to be clear with occasional knots and no staining.

 

He has not had or offered such wood for sale before, but is interested in getting the word out to those who use boxwood. I do not know what price he will be offering the wood for, though I know that he is interested in selling the wood. He asked that I 'get the word out' about the boxwood.

 

It is fresh wood, not dried or seasoned. It was planted in 1840. The location is historic with the civil war period, as a formal planting of two 40 foot circles near a house.

 

His plan for when the wood is cut and delivered, is to paint the ends and place the logs in his barn, out of the elements.

 

I noticed that William Jewel joined the forum today. Perhaps he will add more information about the boxwood, and might also be able to answer your questions.

 

Janel

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A word of caution.

Not all timbers benefit from being sealed at the endgrain. I have had very bad experience with boxwood in this respect. What happened is that I got some sticks, freshly cut, and sealed the ends. Next I know the logs developed gray fungal infection as a result, ruining a lot of the timber. (Still useable if heavily stained, though, and I used some for technical needs, where the look is not important.) More sticks coming from the same exact source (a friendly farm) dried perfectly with no treatment of the endgrain.

However, I have to add that it might be a result of the combination of the local weather (though it isn't particularly wet), and perhaps the boxwood's growth pattern just there.

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In past years there has been discussion about seasoning boxwood. Click here for one topic seasoning boxwood, with some added links to other posts.)

 

There may be other useful information about boxwood by using the SEARCH function, above right, using 'boxwood' as the key word. 'Seasoning' may also yield some results, (not necessarily about cooking enhancements :) ).

 

Janel

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Kenneth, I am very well aware of this metod, and used it myself on a lot of different woods. That's why I did it to boxwood, in the first place. The reason for it is to stop too fast drying through the endgrain, thereby stopping splits developing there. Otherwise the two ends simply dry far faster than the inner sections, leading to a serious imbalance in moisture, resulting in the splits. I used (and continue using )it on cherry, alond, elder, and a lot of NZ native timbers withy perfect results. Boxwood, and another, NZ native wood are the only ones that didn't respond well.

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