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Red Lily


Janel

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Thanks! It is amazing how slowly the detail work goes! Over eight hours yesterday, completing the veining-whatever of the lily petals and just the 18 toes of the frog at the bud opening end. One must tip toe around the wood at this stage or a toe could be sliced off!

 

It is also very tricky to keep the flow of the form true to the line when it passes beneath the frogs and comes out the other side, to make the petal look like the frog was placed on the bud rather than carved from the same block.

 

Another tricky thing is lighting the petals and comparing them. Optical struggles with one light source making light/shadow on the petal edge on the right OR the left of the deeper petal's vein. Only one side shows at a time. Trying to keep all six halves looking like they are related and not carbon copies of one another, while trying to even see them pushed my endurance as the night carving hours progressed.

 

I've also reached the point where I am wishing I had a few more tools to do the undercutting, around behind underneath inbetween... I think I would enjoy some study with a tool maker, to learn about what the different metals you metal guys have written about and what each has to offer to a tool, and to learn how to make tools from it.

 

Now to the bench and for the remainder of toes on the other frog, sanding and contemplating - testing and doing ukibori. That is a lot to hope for one day.

 

Off to make more dust piles...

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Janel,

 

Thats quite satisfying, I`d be inclined to pop in an eye, something dark, translucent and deep and leave it at that. Perhaps its the very appealing and honest tool marks I`m responding to?....hmmm.

 

Ford, poking, as usual. :o but only in the nicest possible way.

 

P.S. avoid the temptation to gild the lily, sorry! could`nt resist. ;) :

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Thanks all of you!

 

Yes, I intend to gild the lily this time. I, too, like the fresh look to the piece as it is, but this piece is for a client who expects color.

 

I've got a shot of the piece that some day I will share with y'all, which, if one or another interpretation clicks, I must insist that it was unintentional though might fit the circumstances! There is also a Japanese interpretation for frogs which harmonizes with the intended arrangement.

 

Thats all for now. The men are away for an overnight and the next 20 hours are all mine! Back to making more dust for the pile. Good fun and humor for your summer weekend, wishes to you all

 

Janel

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Janel, two questions:

when you do ukibori work, how do you stabilize the carving while depressing the wood. The few times I've tried it, I end up holding the punch and carving with one hand and my tack hammer with the other...or do you have enough super human strength to not use a hammer? :)

 

Secondly with the earlier set of 3 or 4 photos you shared- was the carving at a state of only knife and scraper work, or was there some sanding already done, esp on the lily bud?

 

Thanks :D

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From Doug: "when you do ukibori work, how do you stabilize the carving while depressing the wood. The few times I've tried it, I end up holding the punch and carving with one hand and my tack hammer with the other...or do you have enough super human strength to not use a hammer? huh.gif

 

Secondly with the earlier set of 3 or 4 photos you shared- was the carving at a state of only knife and scraper work, or was there some sanding already done, esp on the lily bud?"

 

Lily bud fluting must have been cut and scraped, then the lines straightened with a needle file (slight across grain direction), then likely 220 or/and 320 and maybe a little 400 sanding, but likely not much that high yet. Scraping with a good sharp set of tools eliminates using 220 or 320 when done carefully.

 

Answers to some other questions: (I have more, of course, but will save for after the show. Twenty days and counting down.)

 

 

 

381_3w.jpg

Elmers brand (Tack and Stick?) white putty, kneads and sticks to wood. Quite handy for holding

 

381_4w.jpg

Deep first compressions, sanded or scraped to half depth, then another round of compressions added.

 

381_5w.jpg

This goes with the earlier ukibori image posted. This is it, pre-sanding.

 

As I said, there are more images of this in progress, kind of fun to see, but I'd rather be working on the eyes now. See ya'll later.

 

What are the rest of you working on? Aren't you getting bored with only me doing show and tell? Com'on, I like a little entertainment at the end of the day too!

 

Janel

 

(sweating smilie, with fans blowing) Hot here!

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Ey-yi-yiy! I'm getting a little looney with the limited movement, hard on the fingers work! A couple of days of this is way enough! At one point in time, around 11 p.m., I saw this little thingy looking back at me, making me laugh, so I gathered the accomplishments together and took a family portrait. If the family and the wood are lucky they might get married tomorrow. Sheesh. Time to snooze and get straightened out. Some nights I got lost between the frogs while working on their feet and toes. It has been an odessy of navigation throught the many steps that are done in a necessary order. Rather fun, but must remember to be patient with everything! This is no time to rush or goof this far along!

 

381_6w.jpg

 

Janel

 

 

Was it Ford that said he needs a social life? This seems to be it for me! Workworkwork, then see what TCP has new to help me unwind and perhaps share the work of the day.

 

I wish that more of you were posting what you are up to with your carving! I like to see what is going on with you all!

 

Do not be shy!

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Guest ford hallam

Morning Janel,

 

I trust that a well deserved nights rest has you feeling refreshed and rearing to get stuck into another days work. I`m impatient, as i imagine the rest of your audience are, to see your frog come to life.

 

I really appreciated your sequence of photos of the ukibori process. For a moment though I had thought you`d become so enamoured of metalwork that you`d taken up the chisel and hammer. Back off Lady! thats my domain and I don`t need any competition from you. ;)

or were you drawn to the hammer as your hands are becoming Thor? ( Sorry, It`s probably far too early for bad puns )

 

appreciatevely, Ford

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